Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

?aq'am

Youth Leadership Program

The program is aimed at promoting the health, well-being and resilience of Aboriginal children, youth, individuals and families. The programs goals are to: develop a sense of belonging, ownership and control in youth’s personal lives, their education and within their communities and families; Increase self esteem, self awareness, resiliency and sense of responsibility in order to function as mentally and emotionally well members of their communities and society in general. When youth are connected, they will be more likely to graduate. The aim is to build resilience and well-being of at-risk youth, and families through leadership training, mentorship, self esteem building, cultural connectedness, and educational workshops based on common social issues affecting youth today. The development process will include engaging stakeholders, students and their families in creating a program that fits well within the school system and can be sustained over time. This program must be youth directed to achieve buy in and be successful. Instruments of data collection will be created to gain input into what interests youth, how they would like to be involved and how educators and family can best support them. A training curriculum will be developed based on information collected and timelines for implementation of the program will be established. Near the end a core group of participants will be identified in order to carry the project to implementation.
$10,000.00
2016

Abbotsford Community Services

CREATE COMMUNITY and CASH through CRAFTS

• This project originated from: o Life Chats (LC)is a youth led peer support group and was developed through the HECC initiative to engage and connect youth with lived care experience (WLCE) to each other in Abbotsford. o Learned through LC that youth: • Were still not aware of the supports that they could access after 19 and wanted one on one information from other youth. • Benefitted from having something to do with their hands while connecting with each other. Crafts provided this outlet. • Wanted to make crafts that were marketable. HECC youth developed the following idea and were involved in all aspects of the proposal, including development of the budget. This new proposed project provides 1. Continuation and expansion of Life Chats including connection to resources 2. Research opportunity on social craft enterprise 3. Development of resource for youth leaders to start LC in their own area. a. Purpose: i. To build community within youth WLCE and develop young leaders. ii. To provide youth WLCE with helpful resources in their community. iii. To provide an opportunity to participate in building skills in craft making. iv. To learn about craft making as a social enterprise v. To facilitate youth connection to craft markets to feature their art vi. To share with other youth leaders in other communities how to create a Life Chats group.
$10,000.00
2017

Abbotsford Cultural Centre

Program Activities textual vishyuns: image and text in the work of bill bissett

The Reach will present the exhibition: textual vishyuns: image and text in the work of bill bissett and develop related interpretive programming. This exhibition is based on the recently published book textual vishyuns: image and text in the work of bill bissett and survey his art practice from assemblages and constructions, paintings, drawings, to hand-made books and archival papers, including letters and "small press" ephemera. Since this will be the second major exhibition and the first exhaustive survey of bisset's work, The Reach plans to develop a series of public activities including lectures, seminars and interactive workshops around his poetry, films and the exhibition. The engaging programs will be co-created with Carl Peters of Contemporary Literature & Visual Arts at the University of The Fraser Valley. UFV students and visitors will have an opportunity to examine and engage in a distinctive body of visual art, text and film and to explore a wide range of aesthetics issues and concerns. Our staff educator will utilize the information for student/visitor tours.
$9,500.00
2013

a heart that has no love/pain/generosity is not a heart

The Reach will be displaying the exhibition, 'a heart that has no love/pain/generosity is not a heart', a multifaceted installation comprised of archival photographs, documents, miniature paintings and videos which examines the aftermath of the destruction of the colossal 5th century Buddhas of the Bamiyan Valley in Central Afghanistan in 2001. This exhibition was co-created by Vancouver-based artist Jayce Salloum and Afghan artist Khadim Ali and is an important cross-cultural dialogue between a Canadian artist and an ethnic Afghan-Hazara artist. During the installation of the exhibition Bachelor of Fine Arts Students from the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) will be invited to observe and report the exhibiting artsits' archival/art practice. This process will be documented and used as part of an interpretive tour to help gallery visitors explore the ideas and concepts contained within the exhibition installation.
$8,531.00
2012

Access to Music Foundation

Death in a Dumpster: The impact arts engagement has on youth aging out of care

This project is a collaborative venture between youth, our organization, and professional mentors in association with Directions Youth Services that supports our theory of change that sustained arts programming is a viable engagement method that has lasting benefits for street involved youth and youth aging out of care. Research suggests that the arts provide a positive entry point for youth to develop personal agency and is useful in redirecting inappropriate behaviors and ameliorating depression and suicidal ideations. We have evidence of this through our 2 year relationship with DYS where significant numbers of youth expressed a strong need to access creative activities that help them self-assess personal benchmarks. This project responds to that need and also provides a vehicle whereby youth can develop social, leadership, and applied job related skills as they transition into independence. It is critical that youth do not incur any economic burden while participating in this project and that their efforts are recognized through monetary expression. Long range plans are to amass qualitative, quantitative and narrative data; the last of which is documented on film. Research, anticipated outcomes, film documentation and methodology will be shared with other agencies working with these youth populations to encourage a multi-nested systems change to increase funding for arts and media programs and training, program implementation, heightened issues awareness, and advocacy.
$9,875.00
2015

ACORN Institute Canada

Strengthen Communities by Closing the Digital Divide

AIC, partnered with ACORN Canada, will explore the links between the digital economy and health outcomes for low income people. Systemic change will be influenced by connecting community members with leadership development, community engagement, and opportunities to inform policy to address root causes of inequality in health and prospects. Evidencing lived experience to challenge the current telecommunications policy architecture, the project aims to unlock the various health benefits resulting from digital inclusion. Overall, we seek to address the intersections between poverty, health and the digital economy to close the digital divide and improve health outcomes for low income Canadians.
$10,000.00
2017

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Social Innovation Cohort: Adoption Expo

A grant towards participation in a development process to explore the concept of an Adoption Expo and assess the impact of such an event for ourselves and for our prospective partners. Following the development phase we will then have a clearer understanding of the logistics and the outcomes that can drive a decision to hold an Adoption Expo.
$7,500.00
2016

Alberni Drug and Alcohol Prevention Services Society

The B.R.A.V.E. Project - Boys building Resileincy, Values and Empathy

The BRAVE Project (Build, Resiliency, Values and Empower) is a prevention initiative that builds resiliency and critical thinking skills in youth. The program is a recreation-based, skills development group and weekend prevention outreach for boys aged 12-14. Each series of the BRAVE Project runs six weeks and explores the following topics: Media Messaging and Masculinity, Stress and Coping, Violence, Substance Use, Health Promotion and Personal Challenge/Goal Setting. Each session is two and a half hours and consists of topic discussion and a recreation, skill building or art based activity. By utilizing ADAPS' existing community partnerships, participants experience martial arts, wilderness recreation, bicycle mechanics and community based recreation opportunities through our city parks and recreation. Experiential Learning opportunities such as these are delivered in a way that addresses the four quadrants of resiliency building for youth: Independence, Mastery, Generosity, and Belonging. Strong relationships between youth and a caring adult is key in building resiliency. Outreach services to BRAVE participants and their peers are an important part of this prevention program. The Youth Action Outreach Worker is in the community, building relationships with these youth and supporting prevention initiatives at the Nights Alive Program. The outreach component of BRAVE helps youth to develop relationships to their community supports, and to access healthy activities.
$10,000.00
2015

Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District

A Protocol for Collective Action: Steps towards an Airshed Management Plan for the Alberni Valley

This projects aims to improve air quality in the Alberni Valley. Air pollution is a complex problem that crosses political boundaries and involves everyone. The Alberni Valley is particularly vulnerable to air pollution due to its geography and climate. The Alberni Air Quality Society intends to partner with government bodies, organizations, and the local community to create and formalize a process by which to manage air quality. This will provide an overarching framework to address air pollution in all its forms, whether that be from backyard burning or industrial emissions. This collective action would reduce the human illness and the economic impacts that are associated with air pollut
$10,000.00
2017

Animals in Science Policy Institute

Replacing animals in secondary school science education

A switch to non-animal methods in education is important for animal welfare, education, and student empowerment. This project aims to understand the cultural shift in secondary teaching required so that non-animal alternatives for dissection are more readily adopted. We plan to: 1) survey BC teachers to assess their perspectives on dissection, and identify obstacles to and opportunities for the adoption of non-animal alternatives; 2) poll the BC public to assess their views on dissection; and 3) hold an expert panel event that will bring together international experts on the issue of non-animal alternatives for dissection to identify novel strategies for creating cultural change in teaching
$10,000.00
2017

Arnica Artist Run Centre Society

Keep and support emerging artists in our regional community

Exhibition of artwork completed after primary training is of utmost importance for an artist’s career advancement. A systemic problem for recent BFA graduates is finding a community outside of school that supports their artistic practice including the tools, space and funding to make art at the same caliber as in school and to continue to get fresh influence and critical feedback on their work from senior artists from elsewhere in order to grow their ideas and expertise. To prevent emerging artists from moving away from our remote region, we are proposing to pair a senior BC artist with similar art concerns with a local emerging artist to create artwork to be exhibited in Arnica's gallery.
$10,000.00
2017

Arena

'Arena' is an innovative project that will draw together artists in dialogue and collaboration as they explore two homegrown Kamloops sports phenomena: ice fishing and skater culture. The project will encompass two exhibitions by artists working with site specific installation and photography. The project will engage local artists through mentoring opportunities, artist talks and workshops. A catalogue documenting the project will be published. The 'Arena' project covers two distinct exhibitions, linked under one overarching project that explores the intersections between sport, youth culture, and contemporary art. "Hard Water" will illuminate the culture of ice fishing through the highly evocative photographs of emerging Kamloops artist Devon Lindsay and the chilling ice cave installation of Josh Cleminson and Monte Burman. Steve deBruyn's installation, "Skater!" will explore the aesthetic and functional qualities of DIY built objects associated with skater culture through a fusion of functional skate-park architecture with formal sculptural and painted explorations.
$7,000.00
2013

Arthritis Research Canada (ARC)

"It IS About Us". a reference manual for patients participating in health research.

Patient engagement in research occurs when patients meaningfully collaborate in the research process, taking an active role from the start in advising on a research project, project design or carrying out the research. This is important as it contributes greatly to research relevancy, credibility and accountability - issues important to patients. We propose to develop a comprehensive, user friendly manual “It IS About Us" based on over a decade of experience of ARC's Arthritis Patient Advisory Board (APAB). The Board is a diverse group of arthritis patients who have ample expertise with all aspects of arthritis research. In leveraging the knowledge and experience of their involvement in the research process, the manual will support growth and sustainability of infrastructure that will optimize patient engagement in health research. ARC has a strong history of involving patients and is believed to be one of the few research centres in the world that maintains a Patient Advisory Board to promote consumer involvement in research and knowledge translation activities. We will conduct a comprehensive and inclusive study to include all aspects of the patient concerns from their point of view to build capacity for consumer participation in research decision-making and knowledge translation activities through training and provision of ongoing education to new consumer collaborations. Currently, no standard published protocols written by patients for patients are available.
$10,000.00
2015

Arts in Action Society

Oh the Places You Should Know: A Squamish Place Names Curriculum

The “Oh the Places You Should Know” curriculum project aims to create a foundation for the development of learning materials to accompany the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh Place Names map that are tailored to the needs of individual School Districts situated on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory (Vancouver, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Squamish, and Whistler). The project will include focus groups with teachers in order to understand their needs, collaboration with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh knowledge keepers to collect stories and information to be used in the materials, and the creation of sample materials to be piloted in select School Districts. These materials have the potential to change how those living on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory understand and interact with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples and places. By using these materials, students and teachers can begin to break down the cycle of racism that our education system has historically perpetuated. Awareness is the first step towards change. The materials will afford a deeper understanding of the culture and current issues of the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples, and a greater appreciation of the natural history of the places students and teachers visit every day. With support from Vancouver Foundation, we will be able to develop test materials to pilot in several schools, and gather the feedback required to create inspiring curriculum kits that will change how those on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory learn about Sk_wx_wu´7mesh histories and peoples.
$10,000.00
2016

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

A Reggio Emilia-Inspired Early Learning Centre for BC

Our project is to create a Reggio-based Learning Centre at Frog Hollow that will train and support child care centres and school teachers across BC to implement the Reggio Emilia approach. Activities will include tours of our childcare programs, introductory presentations on the Reggio approach, the production of a practice-based training video, both customized and general workshop presentations, consulting services for centres and teachers, web-based promotion of the Reggio approach and our services, and support for networking and mutual support between centres implementing the Reggio approach. We will begin by focusing on Metro Vancouver and eventually offer training and consultation across the province. There are 102,908 child care spaces in BC for ages 0-12, which is approximately 20% of the total number of children. Our goal is to make the Reggio Emilia approach available to as many of the child care centres as possible. Scaling out the Reggio Emilia approach to centres across BC will result in increased school readiness along the EDI vulnerability areas, a closer alignment with the BC Early Learning Framework, and assist with the transition of children to the school system as the Reggio Emilia approach is both consistent with and complimentary to BC's New Curriculum. We anticipate a change in the early learning system in both the routines and beliefs of the system. The Learning Centre will become a social enterprise and will eventually become self-sustaining.
$10,000.00
2017

Resurfacing History: Land and Lives in Mount Pleasant

Resurfacing History addresses how living in urban centred affects the cultural continuity for Aboriginal people and explores how to build resilience to increase social connection and belonging. The project focuses on developing a community process for promoting understanding between cultural value systems, and to build capacity for Aboriginal people to be part of a mechanism that preserves culture, explores knowledge and integrates actionable steps that can make social ecosystems and infrastructure work for urban communities. Creating onversations focused on land use from Aboriginal worldview & shared pathways are critical for nurturing solidarity & connection.
$10,000.00
2017

An Arts Hub for South Surrey: Engaging Community Through the Arts

The Media Room is a recently refurbished, fully accessible,1800 square foot space located in a heritage building at Camp Alexandra. Our vision is to re-purpose this space by providing equipment and resources to transform it into a venue for arts collaboration, creation, and presentation. This would include audio/visual equipment, display stands, drop sheets, drawing tables, and easels; as well as providing supplies in our crafts room for use by children and youth. Working with the artists and networks with whom we have established relationships, we will populate this space with artists committed to collaborating on projects aimed at social transformation. In keeping with our commitment to hearing the voices of those affected by oppression and marginalization; initially, there will be a specific focus on attracting artists who identify as newcomer Canadians and LGTBQ elders and youth - populations who have self- identified as needing support in our growing and changing community. The collaborative projects created through this facilitation would be presented under the auspices of Alex House. Our intention would be to work with the artists to organize and promote public events, connecting them to a larger engagement strategy. Rather than be an end-in-itself, Alex House would subsequently follow-up by supporting participant-led programs and activities aimed at creating change around the issue highlighted by the performance or installation.
$10,000.00
2016

Mount Pleasant Food Recovery Project

Research the feasibility of food cycle intervention to recover usable food from multiple sources, facilitate remanufacturing by local participants and volunteers into a quality source of food for vulnerable populations, specifically seniors, aboriginal, youth and immigrants. We have observed a large amount of fresh produce moving from the local shops to food waste and recycling mechanisms and also aware of large food insecure populations in Mount Pleasant, especially the vulnerable. The feasibility study will scope out: • potential sources of usable waste food produced by businesses and retailers • existing local food recovery practices (e.g. Fruit Tree project) • existing service providers, community based groups, and other groups involved in the local food system, and other potential partners • ascertain ideas and potential projects that would result in a value added conversion process (e.g. explore opportunities to engage the vulnerable in the process; ie provide training and job opportunities, life skills, capacity building and community development) • barriers or challenges faced by stakeholders in food recovery processes, and recommendations on how to address barriers to undertake the a food recovery program • ways to redistribute food that meets stakeholders needs • recommendations for moving forward on plan implementation
$10,000.00
2015

Cedar Cottage Community Advocate Project

It is our intention with this Develop Grant to explore a community based Advocate model. We want to develop a neighbourhood infrastructure to bridge community to systems. The long term goal of this social innovation idea is to train community residents in systemic issues and develop advocate skills. These trained residents will host a Community Advocate hours, a time residents can go to for neighbours to support engagement in systemic support systems like disability and housing. This advocacy support is intended to bridge, navigate, ask questions and reach resolutions. It is the intention of the Neighbourhood House with the support of a Vancouver Foundation Development grant to explore this resident-to-resident community advocate model community to build resiliency, support networks and solidarity of the whole community. By bridging the flow of system knowledge through community-based relationships it will increase the ability of the Neighbourhood House to support individuals to navigate and engage in complex systems necessary to improve upon our communities social determinants of health in the areas of income and social status, social support networks and education and literacy. In our development year we will seek to document and analyze experiences of residents within systems and develop community specific advocate training through a project collective made up of partner organizations and residents guiding the outcomes with the Project Coordinator.
$10,000.00
2015

Youth Building Community in the Kitchen and Around the Table

Gordon House proposes to Create a weekly community kitchen project, engaging nutritionally vulnerable youth in our community in preparing a meal for each other, under the guidance of a culinary professional. We propose to use this space to animate a discussion, grounded in the Listening Circle model of social engagement taught to us by the Metro Vancouver Alliance, around the root causes of food insecurity, to generate new models of addressing this issue, and to lead the participants into engaging in action which will have a broader impact on the systems they, and others in similar situations, use to access food
$10,000.00
2013

Atira Women's Resource Society

Maxxine Wright Early Care and Learning Centre

The Maxxine Wright Early Care and Learning Centre is a 59 - space daycare associated with Maxxine Wright Place, a comprehensive residential and health/emotional support program for women who are pregnant and/or early parenting and at risk. The daycare has been open since early 2010 and has struggled to achieve full enrollment/break even, for a variety of reasons including: -Atira's inexperience in operating daycares; -The number of infant toddler spaces, which is higher than usual because of the residential program mandate; - Stigma attached to the daycare due to the residential program. We are requesting financial support to stave off closure of the daycare while we reinvigorate our efforts to achieve full enrollment, which includes increased advertising and a comprehensive communications strategy, better utilization of our networks, a mentoring /spportive partnership with the YMCA daycare programs, revisiting our licensing/considering reconfiguration of the types of spaces and training/support of our staff to be more involved in helping us solve the problems.
$10,000.00
2011

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

Foster Youth Food Guide

Foster youths face a multitude of challenges after aging out of government care, from housing to education and employment. However, one of the most immediate and pressing obstacles youth face after losing support, is where they’re going to find their next meal. Due to a lack of support, we know that over half of BC foster youth will become dependent on income assistance (MCFD, 2015). This means that for the majority of foster youth, their weekly food allowance is approximately $18 after factoring in living expenses (Raise the Rates, 2015). As a result, many foster youths need to find alternative sources of free food or confront days of hunger. The good news is that there are many organizations, like Aunt Leah's Place, that offer free food and community supports in Metro Vancouver. Using youth experience and knowledge of these organizations, the Foster Youth Food Guide will create an online food resource that helps young people locate organizations that are transit accessible, safe and promote food security. The guide will be built using Google Maps’ API and include clear directions, detailed descriptions, and pictures or videos of each space. To gather this data, youth researchers will travel and review each location. We believe this project falls directly within Fostering Change’s small grants funding approach, as it is a youth-led project that fills a gap with actionable knowledge and builds relationships between foster youth and their communities in Metro Vancouver.
$4,480.00
2017

The Canoe Project

The Canoe Project will be designed, organized and implemented by Aunt Leah’s Youth Advisory Committee (YAC). The Cano Project has two core aims: First, we (YAC) will participate again in a week-long canoe journey with the stated goal of "recognizing the past by Pulling Together to enhance understanding between Public Service Agencies and Aboriginal Peoples by canoeing the traditional highway, strengthening our future relations". Our journey last year, from Harrison Lake, down the Fraser, to Semiahmoo was a powerful journey which reconnected us culturally on the water, together eating food and listening to Elders around the fire. It also enhanced our understanding of ourselves as youth from care and our connection to public service agencies. We rowed for 5 days with MCFD Social Workers, RCMP Officers, Chiefs and Elders. We will row again in Summer 2016, but this time we will bring a new cohort of young people with us, expanding the representation of youth from care on the 2016 Pulling Together Canoe Journey (www.pullingtogether.ca) by a factor of two! Second, we plan to present the story publicly of who we are as youth from care, using the Canoe Journey as a metaphor. We hope to work on a small presentation that we can take on the road as a workshop in settings such as schools, service clubs, service agencies and conferences. We will make a small video of our proposed presentation and deliver it at TEDx Kids in hopes of getting our message out to a larger audience.
$10,000.00
2015

Axis Theatre Company

R.I.P.

Our project idea originated from an outline submitted to Wayne Specht by K.C Brown. Intrigued by the idea, the next step was to choose and bring a group of talented artists together with the intention of creating an exciting new physical theatre play for adult audiences, loosely based on the story of Rip van Winkle. This method is proven within Axis' history in creating theatre. The current theme is: a person (or persons) waking up in a much later time period from when they first went to sleep. Our development structure will include: • A two day writing phase to flesh out the theme (pre- application) • Two one-week workshops that will develop the subject matter and the script through a non-premise improvisational method. This delivers the opportunity to explore the theme and ideas off the page. • A storyboard and script that will lead to rehearsal and production of the new play. We are planning to premiere R.I.P in our 2013-14 season and serve the adult/family population in Vancouver and BC. If suitable, the play will be adapted into a play for young audiences.
$5,000.00
2012

Balcone Art Society

Vancouver Now: Emerging Artists' Portfolio Series

The project will provide a forum to articulate the idea of "Vancouver Now" from the perspective of emerging and culturally diverse artists and curators. Through Decoy Magazine's website, we will publish a series of emerging visual artists' portfolios investigating specific topics in Vancouver's current socio-economic and cultural situation in relation to the city's history and projected future. Concretely, we will commission 3 Vancouver-based emerging curators to develop the content of a portfolio series, each showcasing the work of 3 emerging Vancouver-based artists. Organized as 3 thematic portfolios series, the final outcome of this project will consist of the online exhibition of the work of 9 emerging artists and publication of 3 critical texts produced by the participating curators. Exhibiting this project through a flexible online platform will enable us to present artworks produced in multiple formats and medias, while not being limited by the durational and spatial constraints associated with traditional exhibition venues.
$5,000.00
2013

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