Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Fraser Health Authority

Improving Access to Primary Health Care in Aboriginal Communities in the Fraser Development Grant (Co-lead Researchers: Ms. Leslie Bonshor, Director, Aboriginal Health, Fraser Health Authority, and Dr. John O'Neil, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, SFU)

This proposal outlines activities to develop a research proposal for a community-based participatory research study to examine barriers and facilitators to accessing primary health care for Aboriginal communities in the Fraser Health region. Fraser Health communities were extensively involved in the 2011 CIHR project, which identified access to primary health care as a key issue. Further community engagement for the development of a new research proposal will be conducted and additional community members and representatives will be invited to join the research team. We propose a development project from January 2014 to December 2014. The initial phase of the project will focus on community engagement and consultation as well as building the research team and further developing partnerships. The second phase will focus on reviewing the literature, finalizing research questions and writing the grant proposal. Research Team members: Ms. Kelow Edehl and Mr. James George.
$10,000.00
2013

University of Victoria

Development Phase - Community Food Literacy Participatory Action Research Project (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Trevor Hancock, Professor, UVIC and Ms. Linda Geggie, Coordinator, Capital Region Food and Agriculture Initiatives Roundtable).

The Development Grant will help us to bring together academic and community partners to develop the Community Food Literacy PAR Project proposal. Community practitioners have identified the need to build community food literacy. We define food literacy to be the ability to access, understand and evaluate information related to food (e.g., how to select and prepare food), including knowledge of where food comes from, its environmental impact and the connection to food through culture and society. The project will advance our understanding of how to coordinate and strengthen community food literacy programs that empower participants to increase control over, and improve their health. A multi-sector advisory group will support the project team to engage community agencies to contribute to and refine, our working definition of food literacy. We will share the information gathered through the Community Food Feasibility Study (appendix 2) in regards to current practices, gaps and opportunities to build food literacy. We will ask the community to reflect on the findings, refine and prioritize research questions, and identify the best methods to gather, share, and take action on what we learn together. In addition at the BC Food Systems Network Gathering we will determine the best methods for knowledge translation so that we can effectively share our findings. Finally we will develop a research proposal and formalize partnerships to move the project forward. Research Team members: Ms. Wanda Martin, Co-Researcher, Mr. Aaren Topley, Research Team member, and Ms. Joan Wharf Higgins, Research Student support.
$10,000.00
2013

Vancouver Island University Foundation

Physical Literacy Development Grant (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Paige Fisher, Vancouver Island University, and Mr. Drew Cooper, PacificSport - Vancouver Island)

Complications from our sedentary lifestyles are seen as the main culprit behind this life expectancy decline. Too much screen time, an unfounded culture of fear that deem it unsafe to allow our children to play outdoors unsupervised and the absence of the simple acts of walking or riding one's bike to school are just some of the contributing issues. However it is the loss of elementary school physical education specialists that is probably the most significant factor in this demise. As a result, the fundamental skills necessary to be able to fully participate in physical activity are seen to be lacking in a growing number of children and young adults to the point where their physical health is in jeopardy. For many children, the lack of fundamental skills makes even basic physical activities an unpleasant experience thereby contributing to an even more sedentary society and putting increased pressure on an already burgeoning health care system. Just as literacy and numeracy are deemed essential tools for success in the 21st century, there are fractions within the health, education, and recreation sectors who maintain that enhancing a community's appreciation for physical literacy is essential to stem the advancing obesity epidemic.
$10,000.00
2013