Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Knowledge Translation of Barriers to Safe Drinking Water in BC Aboriginal Communities

This application is to fund an extension to work on issues related to access to safe drinking water that has been completed by Darlene Sanderson PhD within six separate Aboriginal communities in remote areas of British Columbia. The project is one of community-focused participatory research directly involving members of the communities whose health is affected by lack of access to safe water. For example, one of the communities in which a workshop was held has been on a boil water advisory for the last sixteen years. Activities: The funds will be used to capture the outcomes of six workshops conducted within each of the Aboriginal communities.Dr. Sanderson will analyze data drawn from the workshops and then compare findings from the analysis to findings from a literature search and an environmental scan in order to identify high impact actions that could be taken at local levels to address particular issues relating to access to safe water. Findings will be recorded in reports to each of the six Indigenous communities and made available to them. This stage of the project will build on the momentum generated during the workshops within each of the communities; develop greater understanding of issues around health and access to safe water;and provide community members with the opportunity to take a direct stake in the process of moving knowledge to action.
$10,000.00
2010

UVIC - Centre for Addictions Research

Preventing and Reducing Harms of Substance Use in Homeless Shelter Programs

Our idea will engage both people who experience homelessness and problematic substance and staff who provide shelter services to look at harm reduction strategies to respond to substance use in emergency shelter programs in a new way. Currently, these settings struggle with contradictory practices, policies and beliefs. Emergency shelters provide low-threshold shelter to those who are currently engaged in substance use as well as barring substance use by residents to support those who seek to avoid substance use while also being a site for some harm reduction services but not others. The issues are complex and the shelter population is diverse and both shelter staff and residents have identified the need to do things differently.
$10,000.00
2015

Vancouver Coastal Health Authority

Community Based Research Centre for Concurrent Disorders (Researchers: N/A)

This project will develop methods to measure clinical outcomes via the collection, analysis and interpretation of quantitative and qualitative data gathered at Stepping Stones Concurrent Disorders Service primarily, and then sister agencies on the North Shore. That being said, it is hope that this grant will enable the investigators at the Stepping Stones to conduct outreach and field work throughout the North Shore in order to engage the many stakeholder who work with individuals struggling with concurrent disorders. The end result of this project is to create a Community Based Research Centre for Concurrent Disorders. (Research Team: N/A)
$3,575.00
2014

Vancouver Island University Foundation

Physical Literacy Development Grant (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Paige Fisher, Vancouver Island University, and Mr. Drew Cooper, PacificSport - Vancouver Island)

Complications from our sedentary lifestyles are seen as the main culprit behind this life expectancy decline. Too much screen time, an unfounded culture of fear that deem it unsafe to allow our children to play outdoors unsupervised and the absence of the simple acts of walking or riding one's bike to school are just some of the contributing issues. However it is the loss of elementary school physical education specialists that is probably the most significant factor in this demise. As a result, the fundamental skills necessary to be able to fully participate in physical activity are seen to be lacking in a growing number of children and young adults to the point where their physical health is in jeopardy. For many children, the lack of fundamental skills makes even basic physical activities an unpleasant experience thereby contributing to an even more sedentary society and putting increased pressure on an already burgeoning health care system. Just as literacy and numeracy are deemed essential tools for success in the 21st century, there are fractions within the health, education, and recreation sectors who maintain that enhancing a community's appreciation for physical literacy is essential to stem the advancing obesity epidemic.
$10,000.00
2013

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