Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

?aq'am

Youth Leadership Program

The program is aimed at promoting the health, well-being and resilience of Aboriginal children, youth, individuals and families. The programs goals are to: develop a sense of belonging, ownership and control in youth’s personal lives, their education and within their communities and families; Increase self esteem, self awareness, resiliency and sense of responsibility in order to function as mentally and emotionally well members of their communities and society in general. When youth are connected, they will be more likely to graduate. The aim is to build resilience and well-being of at-risk youth, and families through leadership training, mentorship, self esteem building, cultural connectedness, and educational workshops based on common social issues affecting youth today. The development process will include engaging stakeholders, students and their families in creating a program that fits well within the school system and can be sustained over time. This program must be youth directed to achieve buy in and be successful. Instruments of data collection will be created to gain input into what interests youth, how they would like to be involved and how educators and family can best support them. A training curriculum will be developed based on information collected and timelines for implementation of the program will be established. Near the end a core group of participants will be identified in order to carry the project to implementation.
$10,000.00
2016

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Social Innovation Cohort: Adoption Expo

A grant towards participation in a development process to explore the concept of an Adoption Expo and assess the impact of such an event for ourselves and for our prospective partners. Following the development phase we will then have a clearer understanding of the logistics and the outcomes that can drive a decision to hold an Adoption Expo.
$7,500.00
2016

Arts in Action Society

Oh the Places You Should Know: A Squamish Place Names Curriculum

The “Oh the Places You Should Know” curriculum project aims to create a foundation for the development of learning materials to accompany the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh Place Names map that are tailored to the needs of individual School Districts situated on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory (Vancouver, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Squamish, and Whistler). The project will include focus groups with teachers in order to understand their needs, collaboration with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh knowledge keepers to collect stories and information to be used in the materials, and the creation of sample materials to be piloted in select School Districts. These materials have the potential to change how those living on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory understand and interact with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples and places. By using these materials, students and teachers can begin to break down the cycle of racism that our education system has historically perpetuated. Awareness is the first step towards change. The materials will afford a deeper understanding of the culture and current issues of the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples, and a greater appreciation of the natural history of the places students and teachers visit every day. With support from Vancouver Foundation, we will be able to develop test materials to pilot in several schools, and gather the feedback required to create inspiring curriculum kits that will change how those on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory learn about Sk_wx_wu´7mesh histories and peoples.
$10,000.00
2016

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

An Arts Hub for South Surrey: Engaging Community Through the Arts

The Media Room is a recently refurbished, fully accessible,1800 square foot space located in a heritage building at Camp Alexandra. Our vision is to re-purpose this space by providing equipment and resources to transform it into a venue for arts collaboration, creation, and presentation. This would include audio/visual equipment, display stands, drop sheets, drawing tables, and easels; as well as providing supplies in our crafts room for use by children and youth. Working with the artists and networks with whom we have established relationships, we will populate this space with artists committed to collaborating on projects aimed at social transformation. In keeping with our commitment to hearing the voices of those affected by oppression and marginalization; initially, there will be a specific focus on attracting artists who identify as newcomer Canadians and LGTBQ elders and youth - populations who have self- identified as needing support in our growing and changing community. The collaborative projects created through this facilitation would be presented under the auspices of Alex House. Our intention would be to work with the artists to organize and promote public events, connecting them to a larger engagement strategy. Rather than be an end-in-itself, Alex House would subsequently follow-up by supporting participant-led programs and activities aimed at creating change around the issue highlighted by the performance or installation.
$10,000.00
2016

Be the Change Earth Alliance Society

Greenest School Lab

The Lab is a proposal to convene a multi-stakeholder coalition that will guide participants in addressing the personal, social, and environmental conditions necessary for creating a model ecological culture in a school. By engaging the knowledge, shared values, and professional resources of stakeholders BTCEA will be informed and positioned to ensure that this initiative delivers: 1. An impact-driven coalition of stakeholders who will come together at various stages of collaboration to share their knowledge, experience, and concepts. 2. A deliberative and dynamic process developed around shared values that will effectively surface innovative ideas and prototypes for building a model school necessary for a sustainable future. 3. A knowledge-rich network of relationships that will sustain the process for surfacing innovative ideas for school-based initiatives to be prototyped and piloted in a school in the Vancouver and Surrey districts. To bring the greenest school into reality, BTCEA will identify the different users of a greenest school, determine what design interventions they can create together, and deliver a prototype that they can test together. Stakeholders will share ideas and insights, first individually and then collectively, on supporting systemic change as already advanced within provincial and municipal policy change to develop the greenest school model and work to align school-based social interactions with sustainability principles.
$10,000.00
2016

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Redefining Get Outside BC (RGOBC)

RGOBC will change the way we act, what we believe and potentially the resources that flow to youth-centered programing. First, CPAWS-BC will accept that our current model of hosting a single summit in the Lower Mainland as the primary tool for youth engagement and leadership training is flawed. Instead, with the Vancouver Foundation’s support, we will host a four-day youth summit in Central Vancouver Island, the Okanagan, and the Kootenays, as well as focus and planning groups in various regions. To date, most youth programs are devised in Vancouver and implemented elsewhere. RGOBC will be devised and implemented locally, leaving space for the influence and sharing of ideas from other regions, ensuring a wider range of voices and experience are incorporated. Youth and a diverse group of educators, leaders and social innovators will collaborate in the program with the intention of critiquing, deconstructing and rebuilding the structure and approach. Youth will lead all aspects of the process. Non-youth participants, including potential corporate funders, will be engaged in the program, but will take guidance from youth throughout. It will help create “buy-in” for the concept and program, since adults will be part of the larger systemic change and will be asked to be a part of the long-term funding plan. The final program outcomes will be shared with the broader environmental community in an effort to change the wider movement. CPAWS-BC will demonstrate that change is possible
$9,000.00
2016

Carnegie Community Centre Association

Social Innovation Cohort: Our Community Vision for Mental Health

A grant to participate in a development process to explore ideas around utilizing the experiential knowledge of participants and includes two key components: community participatory research and a grassroots visioning process. Through the participatory research portion of the project we are seeking to contribute to a broadened understanding of the societal and social determinants of mental health, especially the issues and barriers specifically faced by low-income DTES resident with mental illness. This first phase has already started and we have been having regular weekly meetings to plan the research process. Building on research findings emerging from the first phase, our second objective is to co-create a shared community vision of mental health in the DTES. By engaging in practical community research and knowledge production, participants not only learn new skills but see themselves in a position of competence, as experts of their own health and wellbeing, while also obtaining valuable knowledge and information about the structures surrounding them. This approach will combine participation and knowledge to foster DTES residents confidence and leadership abilities to meaningfully participate in decision-making forums and processes, sustain broader community involvement, and work with related community groups to build consensus, strength and new relationships towards improving their own mental health as well as the wider health of their families and community.
$7,500.00
2016

Our Community Vision for Mental Health

The project is based on the recognition that housing is a primary and fundamental social determinant of mental health. It seeks to give low-income Downtown Eastside residents living with mental illness, trauma, and disability the power to contribute to—and seek knowledge about—their health by developing a new “residents first” approach to supportive housing provision and management. Their influence is integral to bettering social housing. We will facilitate spaces to draft and establish best practices and guidelines for meeting and decision-making. We observe an urgent need to work well in coalition, in good communication with other organizations, groups, networks, and services and we can contribute to their longevity. Part of our work will be to strengthen our community member's capacity to participate in decision-making structures. Through visual description, creative form, mapping, media we will address language barriers related to literacy and translation. We can influence the representation of our community. This work will advance our knowledge of supportive housing provision. Amplifying residents' voices and experience informed and grounded in the experience and needs of existing and future social housing residents. As a peer-led project, this plan will have at its core the fundamental belief that people living with mental illness, addictions, and poverty should be able to make basic decisions concerning the day-to-day activities in their lives and homes.
$10,000.00
2016

Christ Church Cathedral

Social Innovation Cohort: Transforming Food Outreach Programs

A grant to participate in a development process ito explore the connection between and amongst volunteers, participants, and outside supports, with the goal of re-designing our programs to increase connectivity and reduce social isolation. This will be achieved by: • Reviewing the Cathedral’s existing food outreach and its suitability for the homeless population in the downtown business district through - Consulting with existing participants to determine their own needs and reasons for participating in the Cathedral’s food outreach programs - Consulting with existing volunteers to determine their own needs and reasons for participating in the Cathedral’s food outreach programs - Consulting with other downtown churches and service providers to assess current services in the immediate area • Prototyping, workshopping and designing opportunities – with the assistance of volunteers and participants – new or re-envisioned program offerings that respond to the most clearly articulated needs - Surveying the Cathedral’s volunteer database to determine availability and willingness to serve in these ways - Developing and/or strengthening partnerships with other service providers and voluntary organizations in downtown Vancouver that will help respond to these needs - Identifying trained professionals who can assist with new initiatives as identified in project plan
$7,500.00
2016

The Maundy Cafe

Systemic change beyond the Cathedral relies on vulnerably sharing the lessons learned through our year-long program transformation process with faith-based organizations seeking a way to deepen community engagement. This project will catalyze systemic change by building on faith leaders’ recognition of social isolation as a major issue facing their communities and neighbourhood networks. By sharing our experiences we will encourage other organizations to take similar risks to address the bigger issues of loss of community and economic bifurcation. The project will create toolkits, training programs, and workshops that will help other faith-based organizations to transform the entire process of food preparing, serving, composting, and cleaning into the vehicle by which inclusion, participation and community resiliency can be strengthened. We will also influence systemic change through the provision of focused opportunities for study and practical hands-on learning. In collaboration with our partners including other non-profits and local businesses, we will host public keynote events focused on how others can address social isolation, as well as workshops and voluntary opportunities for enterprises looking to channel their corporate social responsibility.
$10,000.00
2016

Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention Centre of British Columbia

Advancing Lifesaving Enhancements to the Follow-up of Suicidal Individuals

Suicide is an important public health issue where an average of 10 people die by suicide each day in Canada. As identified in The Cost of Injury in Canada, a study funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada (June 2015), in 2010 there were 510 deaths by suicide in BC alone. In the same year, suicide and self-harm also resulted in 4539 emergency visits and 2855 hospitalizations, resulting in indirect and direct costs totalling $410M within the province. While the human cost of pain, grief and suffering are intangible, the economic costs of suicide are tangible and have resulted in significant economic challenges to the healthcare system. With a comprehensive case-managed 24/7 continuum of community support, the research shows that many of the 500+ deaths in BC can be prevented. Many suicidal people often do not seek support due to stigma around suicide. Crisis line contact, with its 24/7 accessibility and safety to reach out, can increase engagement and establish trust and further help seeking. With the already established rapport, our extended follow up process will help suicidal clients to better manage their own safety; however, phone and online service may not be sufficient to meet clients’ needs and face to face services are often required. Currently, fragmented service delivery processes exist for suicidal individuals. We are researching the impact of a structured follow up process over a period of time to determine the impact on connectedness and continuity of care.
$10,000.00
2016

Dancers of Damelahamid Society

Coastal First Nations Dance Festival’s Youth and Emerging Artist Development program

This project will focus on finding ways to strengthen the impact of the Coastal First Nations Dance Festival’s Youth and Emerging Artist Development program. The festival has been produced annually in partnership with the UBC Museum of Anthropology since 2008. The impetus behind the festival is not only to present dance but also to sustain the art form and the community of artists it serves. CFNDF’s Youth and Emerging Artist Development program will include a set of performances for K-12 audiences. Emerging Indigenous artists will be presented in these performances. This is a unique opportunity to witness Indigenous dance in a cultural setting, and for the students to develop an understanding of diverse artistic practices from an early age. The festival will also partner with Aboriginal youth organizations who will partake in movement workshops facilitated by the professional emerging artists. The workshops for CFNDF 2017 will focus on Metis jigging, hoop dancing, song and story. There will be 5 performances and 3 workshops. Audience size is 250-300 per performance. The total number of people anticipated to be served by this program will therefore be approximately 1,300 to over 1,500 persons.
$5,000.00
2016

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House

Social Innovation Cohort: LET’S SPEAK UP! : VOLUNTEER DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP PROJECT FOR THE DTES

A grant to participate in a development process in order to explore ideas around the structural barriers created by legislation of the Charity and Societies legislation that contribute to barriers. Analyze and articulate ways that organizations by-laws create barriers and create paternalism Assess whether there is an interest on the part of DTES Charity groups to meaningfully engage the resident population Set up workshop and focus group schedules, identify outside resource, contact guest speakers and facilitators to give the leadership training workshops to pilot a community voices project that trains and engages local residents in civic leadership and engagement Draft interview scripts based on findings from the initial research, and contact interviewees to develop a schedule. Launch workshops marketing and promotion by various channels, and recruit participants for the workshops. Conduct interviews Non-profit board chairs. Implement workshops and collect feedback. Analyze data of interviews. Implement workshops and collect feedback. Draft final research report. Develop volunteer training curriculum with the volunteer coordinator. Final research report due. Final volunteer training curriculum completed.
$7,500.00
2016

Fresh Air Learning

Spreading Our Branches: Investigating Opportunities for Forest School Expansion in Metro Vancouver

Our project will create stronger connections between those who are part of the Metro Vancouver forest school movement. We will bring together existing catalysts in this movement interact with an eye to building an integrated plan to address the needs of children in our region. Anticipated participants include elementary school, early childhood, and outdoor educators, parents, staff from teacher education programs, and others who are part of the support system for this work, such as land managers and parent community developers. During a series of facilitated meetings, we will do the following: Identify key players who are currently part of or connected to the forest school movement Invite these individuals to a gathering in the late fall or winter of 2016 In the spring of 2017, hold small group meetings focused on areas such as teacher education, early childhood program development, elementary program development, and out of school care. The goals of the meetings will be as follows: Share resources and develop opportunities to learn from one another Understand how broader institutions such as child care licensing or teacher education can support this work Examine the needs, gaps, and opportunities to develop programs in different areas or for different groups of people Work with catalysts to determine what support they need to advance their projects. This process will develop a more cohesive plan for outdoor learning in Metro Vancouver.
$8,500.00
2016

Il Centro

Cultural Exploration and Engagement (working title)

Il Centro has been actively been pursuing and developing the collaborative, co-presentation and partnership approach for the past two years, the results to date, have had a significant impact on our organization as we are now perceived by our professional partners and collaborators as a valid and credible cultural entity that can play a more proactive role in the broader cultural context in the City. At the same time, il Centro has engaged in several projects that have linked the professional arts world with our multicultural partners, demonstrating the value, and we believe, our hypothesis that connecting the two assets-culture and multiculturalism-both addresses the systemic challenges as well as creating new and exciting content for our evolving culture. Despite the positive organizational experience we feel that the engagement approach has not been developed into its full potential. While we have broached the concept in a discussion with the City Vancouver Cultural Affairs department we have recognized that we need to create a proof of concept or study that documents our hypothesis and measures the impact in both artistic outcomes as well as quantitative outputs. Working with our partners, Il Centro will track and gather data from the collaborative and partnership events that will test the concept and, we believe, allow us to begin to address the systemic issue through a documentation, dissemination and engagement outreach strategy and campaign.
$10,000.00
2016

Indian Summer Arts Society

Taiké: An Inter-Cultural Arts Development Project

There’s a Punjabi word for First Nations people that is only used in Vancouver. It doesn’t exist in India, or even in Toronto, Winnipeg or Calgary. The word is taiké and it was used when First Nations and South Asian men worked and lived together at lumber mills. Taiké translates to mean ‘father’s elder brother’. According to cultural researcher Naveen Girn, “It speaks to the idea of cousins between First Nations and South Asians, but also this idea of shared ancestry.” (Source: Vancouver Courier) The relationships that early South Asian immigrants were able to establish with Indigenous peoples has largely been lost and little is known of its history. What is evident though, is a shared sense of community, of storytelling traditions, and of respect for cultural inheritance. This project seeks to renew and re-build that respect and sense of kinship, through developing opportunities for First Nations and South Asian artists to work collaboratively on artistic projects, with the intention of eventually culminating in an outcome at Indian Summer Festival. Development funding from the Vancouver Foundation will enable us to offer South Asian and First Nations artists the opportunity to spend time together, begin exploring what their collaborations might look like and come up with viable project plans. We aim to create one or more projects to fit into Indian Summer Festival’s omnivorous, multi-disciplinary curatorial approach.
$10,000.00
2016

Justice For Girls

Young Women and Girls Advocacy and Education Center

JFG will bring together community stakeholders, and in particular young women with experience of marginalization and homelessness in Vancouver, to shape our response to these systemic educational barriers. This community dialogue and current needs assessment will be organized and facilitated by a Project Team comprised of a JFG Team Leader, a Youth Advocate and 3-5 Youth Mentors who have experience of marginalization. The Develop Grant will fund this development process: 1. Apr.:Build Project Team *Training on girl’s rights, advocacy and accompaniment, interviewing skills, facilitating focus groups, leadership skills, public speaking, researching/analyzing data, etc. 2. May-Oct.:Engage Community *Stakeholder Engagement-conduct outreach, interviews, focus groups with "first voice" young women; their families; frontline youth, anti-violence and anti-poverty workers; educational and health professionals; Youth/ Women's/Aboriginal organizations, etc. *Research-current reports and promising practices nationally/internationally *Public Awareness-share learning through speaking engagements, writing, media, blogs, website, etc. with the intention of influencing public understanding, as well as educational policies, programs and training 3. Nov.:Create Project Plan *With the collected body of knowledge, create an innovative and strategic project plan with the goal of transforming the way we support and educate marginalized girls 2017: Test *Implement project plan and test
$10,000.00
2016

Kelowna Art Gallery

Okanagan Boys & Girls Club in partnership with the Kelowna Art Gallery

The Okanagan Boys and Girls Clubs are dedicated to assisting their members gain access to experience and grow up to become all they can be. We know some of the youth accessing our programs at the Downtown Youth Centre face barriers to participating in something like art classes - something so many of us may take for granted. The partnership between the Kelowna Art Gallery and the OKanagan Boys and Girl Club, Downtown Youth Centre (and shelter) will help the partners remove those barriers and invest in youth's artistic growth and social development. By providing monthly art classes, hosted by professional artists, youth will be exposed to different forms of artistic expression in the forms of different approaches to art making and mediums. In addition, Youth will also be engaged in pre-scheduled community art workshops hosted by the Kelowna Art Gallery." We are hoping that the Kelowna Art Gallery can become a space where youth feel safe connecting, and trying something new, where they laugh at their failures, and blow their own minds" - Downtown Youth Centre Director; Sarah MacKinnon.
$5,000.00
2016

Kokoro Dance Theatre Society

Downtown Eastside Artistic Community Outreach

This is a capacity building project to increase the participation of DTES artists and groups in using our studio spaces and in attending events that take place there. This project is connected to a sustainability issue that we face in operating the new cultural spaces. We have completed a draft business plan with consultant Linda Gorrie that identifies the financial challenges we will have in covering the overhead costs of operating the facility. Since our intention is to make KW Studios affordable and accessible to marginalized artists and groups in the DTES, we need to have a better understanding of the numbers of potential DTES users, their specific needs, and their financial capabilities, or lack thereof, toward contributing some cost returns, and the potential amount of time their use would entail. This will establish a target financial goal for providing partial or complete subsidies for those with artistic projects that could benefit from access to our physical resources. The facilities consist of a 1,050 sq.ft. dance studio adjacent to the Woodward's Atrium, a 3,802 sq. ft. basement production and recording studio, and a 450 sq. ft. meeting/workshop room on the 2nd floor. To find out what we need to know, we plan to hire a consultant with knowledge of the DTES community.
$6,500.00
2016

Marpole-Oakridge Family Place Society

Social Innovation Cohort: Buidling Capacity Bridging the Divide in Marpole

A grant to participate in a development process in order to explore the following issues: - a community assessment map of services, service providers, businesses, and public partners - identify who the stakeholders of the community are - a stakeholder engagement process to decide what are the gaps in services in the community and where should services be provided - the committee will collect, process, and evaluate the information gathered and create a capacity building and community bridging plan for the Marpole Oakridge area - create a terms of reference for process of engagement with current and future community partners and service providers - create an effective system of information and resource sharing to bridge the gap between service providers and provide easy access to information and resources for stakeholders The end result will be a plan that outlines how to address the change in services, location of services, how information is distributed throughout the community and City as large of changes, programs and resources available.
$7,500.00
2016

Nanaimo Art Gallery

Three Questions for Nanaimo

Exploring themes that are integral to the identity of this community, "Black Diamond Dust" and "Silva" empowered residents to encounter contemporary art on their own terms. "Three Questions for Nanaimo" will build on this momentum and engagement involving more people and more points of view. The Gallery will scale deeper through sustained, long term dialogues with community stakeholders, partner organizations, and local thought leaders, growing a community that supports the gallery because the artworks and ideas it shares matter to them. Our project will launch with the question: "What Does it mean to Live on an Island," and will engage expertise from a range of constituents including members of Vancouver Island’s indigenous communities, marine biologists, ecologists, fishers, and academics, along with local, national, and international artists, creating an innovative and sustainable year long program of exhibitions, public events, and encounters. This model will also build our organizational capacity: we will hire a curatorial assistant and increase education staff hours. Through expanded field research and outreach, we will create opportunities to connect with specific partners, and work in more sustained long-term relationships. Years two and three will explore questions around communication and mobility. Each project will be based in the gallery, but extended through the region, and widely activated through digital and print platforms.
$10,000.00
2016

Nature Trust of British Columbia

KCP Landowner Outreach Program

In 2015 the Kootenay Conservation Program (KCP) worked with both it's West Kootenay and East Kootenay Stewardship Committees (55 partner organizations) to discuss KCP's role in Landowner Outreach in the Kootenay Region. The Committees identified the need to increase regional support for Landowner Outreach and addressed the need to develop a comprehensive plan for 2017/2018 to deliver: 1) a web-based landowner Stewardship Resource Centre 2) KCP landowner outreach support to partner organizations (i.e. conference/workshops, landowner resource guide, etc) In order to develop a comprehensive plan, KCP will host two 1 day facilitated workshops with both the East and West Kootenay Stewardship Committees to determine the goals for a Landowner Stewardship Resource Centre and how KCP can provide support to it's partner organizations. KCP will provide extensive background information and resources to the committees prior to the workshops and will compile the results of the workshops to create a comprehensive plan for 2017/2018.
$4,500.00
2016

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Social Innovation Cohort: Chinese-speaking Seniors Service Delivery HUB

A grant to participate in a development process to explore the needs of Chinese-speaking seniors in our community. The question is not ‘what kind of special projects can we create to reach out to and support these seniors?’ but, rather, “given that the majority of these seniors are long-tern members of the community, and that the majority of them are Canadian citizens, why have the public and private services, that should be available to residents, not been designed and developed in ways that meet the needs of this key community demographic?” As was pointed out at a recent meeting of service providers, almost all the services available in the neighbourhood are focused on serving people living with addictions and/or severe mental health issues, many of whom live in SROs or are on the street. It is little wonder that many elderly residents of the area, whether Chinese-speaking or not, feel not just uncomfortable but afraid when trying to access these services, even though they may desperately need the assistance. One of the models to which we will be looking as we move forward is that of the highly successful ‘South Vancouver Seniors Hub” and, in particular, the toolkit developed by the Hub (Seniors Hub Toolkit) to assist other neighbourhoods in empowering and supporting seniors to directly impact the types of services and supports available to them.
$7,500.00
2016

Power to the People(!): making a neighbourhood work for Chinese speaking Seniors

This project takes a different approach than has traditionally been taken in looking at the needs of Chinese-speaking seniors in our community, i.e.: not ‘what kind of special projects can we create to reach out to and support these seniors?’ but, rather, “given that the majority of these seniors are long-term members of the community, and that the majority of them are Canadian citizens, why have the public and private services that should be available to residents not been designed and developed in ways that meet the needs of this key community demographic?” 1. Addressing service fragmentation • Formalize Service Providers’ Network • Develop and update a bilingual service directory 2. Empowering Chinese seniors by creating a seniors’ advisory (SA), and ultimately a Seniors Hub Model. We will be using learning from the highly-successful ‘South Vancouver Seniors Hub” and, in particular, the toolkit developed by the Hub( Seniors Hub Toolkit) to assist other neighbourhoods in empowering and supporting seniors to directly impact the types of services and supports available to them. • Identify Chinese-speaking seniors who are leaders and volunteers in the neighbourhood. • Develop Chinese materials and conduct outreach to engage Chinese senior community • Conduct capacity-building activities to build seniors’ collective knowledge and voice • Work with SA to develop terms of reference and vision for council • Support SA members to utilize their personal networks
$10,000.00
2016

Pacific Community Resources Society

Social Innovation Cohort: LGBTQ2S Mentorship

A grant to participate in a development process in order to explore the idea to create a new pathway for LGBTQ2S youth to access services and supports related to housing, life skills, and social-emotional competence. Research has shown that building permanency though stable and supportive close relationships leads to more positive outcomes for youth in care. Our project will focus on LGBTQ2S youth who are in care, in unsafe/unsupportive homes, homeless, or unstably housed to build long-term community connections through establishing a roster of queer-friendly community housing alternatives, mentorship pairing, and a network of supportive LGBTQ2S peers and adults. The development process will begin by consulting key stakeholders on issues relating to LGBTQ2S youth. We will talk to young people and frontline workers (such as our Housing staff) to better understand gaps in our current system and we will connect with community organizations who have implemented programs related to LGBTG2S youth, housing, and mentorship to better understand what is being done. Specifically, we look to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Calgary’s new Aura Host Homes project as model for social innovation in this area. Finally, we plan to assess the available resources and capacity that exists for this project by forming a planning group made up of stakeholders from BYRC and at least one additional organization. Together with a youth steering committee we will determine an outline for a pilot project pairing mentorship with housing for LGBTQ2S youth.
$7,500.00
2016

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