Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

DanStabat Performance Society o/a Tara Cheyenne Performance

How to Be

After the success of the ensemble work, Highgate, there has been an impetus to create another group work. How to Be, originated after research work on another project experimented with "being" in performance. The seed for the work is the idea of "being" and trying to be incompetent (to place oneself in a transparent state of vulnerability) and not worrying about being entertaining, which both to an artist are incredibly difficult. Tara chose to create with talented and successful Vancouver artists at various stages of their careers and who are creating/performing very different kinds of work. The desire is for the work to be shared, and a dialogue to develop as a result. As an artist, Tara is interested in the exchange of ideas and artistic sensibilities to discover the parts of ourselves that come from, not what we already do as artists and creators, but from what we don't think of putting on stage or presenting. This phase of the research and development of this new work is to support the rehearsals prior to the work-in-progress presentation in the spring of 2015.
$5,000.00
2014

David Suzuki Foundation

Charged Up: Accelerating Community-led Renewable Energy in BC

The conversation around climate change tends to leave individuals and communities feeling overwhelmed, powerless and full of anxiety. It often seems there is little we can do at the local level, and that what governments are doing is just not enough. Small-scale, community owned energy projects can empower communities to be part of positive, meaningful efforts to combat climate change through shared action. The Charged Up campaign will showcase community success stories, convene and train community leaders, and build a clean energy community who can support one another in addressing the technical, financial, and regulatory issues that come with clean energy projects.
$10,000.00
2017

Decoda Literacy Foundation

Decoda Literacy Conference

Decoda Literacy Conference
$10,000.00
2013

District of Invermere

Columbia Valley Shared Solar Initiative

The Imagine Invermere Implementation Committee is seeking to address energy security for the Columbia Valley by developing a Community Shared Solar Initiative, allowing community members to invest in solar energy production on municipal buildings to reduce their energy bills, reduce their municipal tax bills, and potentially see a future return on their investment. Community shared energy production can buffer rising energy costs and ensure more predictable energy costs for citizens, helping to ensure more secure financial futures in community households.
$5,000.00
2017

District of North Vancouver

Collaborating to Increase Access to Healthy and Sustainable Food for Children at School

We propose a breakfast program for children at Sherwood Park Elementary School that is prepared at the commercial kitchen at the TWN community centre, transported to and served at the school. We will create a system to rescue and utilize surplus grocery store food in the breakfast. The goal is to create a pilot that is replicable and scalable, incorporates Food Safe protocols for the rescued food, and to develop an operating manual for how to incorporate surplus food into food procurement practices for this and other healthy food access programs. We are looking for support from the Vancouver Foundation to allow us time to build the necessary partnerships, clarify roles and responsibilities and develop protocols and procedures. While we have had preliminary discussions with champions at some of the organizations (TWN and SD44), further work is required before final approvals are in place and there are more organizations and discussions needed to transition our idea into reality. This socially innovative project aims to: Change the resource flows in the social systems of the school and TWN community by redirecting grocery store food that might otherwise go to waste or compost; Change beliefs about the importance of food/nutrition in helping children achieve optimal educational outcomes; Preserve community ‘edible food’ surplus and demonstrate opportunity for higher use of this food; Create opportunities for training hours for PC1 Chefs who work at the TWN commercial kitchen
$9,550.00
2015

District of Wells

Starting Well in Wells

The idea for the Wells Community Day Care arose out of conversations among parents at the pre-school play group. The lack of child care was identified as a major hindrance to families with young children in our community. Reliable child care would allow the possibility for both parents and single parents to be part of the work force, especially in a seasonal, tourism-based economy; this is virtually impossible now as there are no options for certified child care. Meanwhile, there is a growing population of families with pre-school aged children. Our intention is to start a licensed, multi-aged (newborn to 12 years) day care facility in Wells providing safe and reliable child care. For many Wells pre-schoolers, such a centre would also provide their first regular, structured learning environment with other children and with an Early Childhood Education practitioner.
$9,250.00
2014

Dogwood Rescue Society

Re-homing of Unwanted Senior Dogs

Many elderly dogs are dumped in shelters or left with vets to be euthanized solely because they are old. Most of these dogs will naturally live a healthy and comfortable life for a few years with some basic care. We often have more difficulty finding permanent homes for our older rescued dogs than their younger counterparts. Many low income seniors have the space, time and love to adopt an older dog, but not the money that is needed to fund the care of a pet. Placing a resident pet in a long term care or assisted living facility is also a wonderful idea because both the dog and the humans benefit from the positive and loving relationship that will form. We would require funding for equipment related to the set-up of the senior dog into its new home. Equipment needed: crates, beds, collars, leashes, safety harnesses, grooming equipment, food dishes, pet gates, blankets, towels, pet steps, ramps, and possibly even wheelcarts for dogs that have trouble walking. Any medical needs could be funded by one of our existing programs. All our rescued dogs receive vet attention when needed.
$3,000.00
2013

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House

Social Innovation Cohort: LET’S SPEAK UP! : VOLUNTEER DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP PROJECT FOR THE DTES

A grant to participate in a development process in order to explore ideas around the structural barriers created by legislation of the Charity and Societies legislation that contribute to barriers. Analyze and articulate ways that organizations by-laws create barriers and create paternalism Assess whether there is an interest on the part of DTES Charity groups to meaningfully engage the resident population Set up workshop and focus group schedules, identify outside resource, contact guest speakers and facilitators to give the leadership training workshops to pilot a community voices project that trains and engages local residents in civic leadership and engagement Draft interview scripts based on findings from the initial research, and contact interviewees to develop a schedule. Launch workshops marketing and promotion by various channels, and recruit participants for the workshops. Conduct interviews Non-profit board chairs. Implement workshops and collect feedback. Analyze data of interviews. Implement workshops and collect feedback. Draft final research report. Develop volunteer training curriculum with the volunteer coordinator. Final research report due. Final volunteer training curriculum completed.
$7,500.00
2016

Family Drop-in: Families, Farming and Food

A safe drop-in space for families in the Downtown Eastside (M-F and Sunday from 4-7pm) This program has been developed to improve the determinants of health for families and children in our community through a program emphasis on food literacy, healthy meal preparation, culinary exploration and urban farming practices. A major component to the program is that it will be based on a peer led model. Families will be recruited as both participants, but also as volunteers who will lead the program with the support of a paid coordinator to help actualize their vision within the scope of the project.
$10,000.00
2012

Ecotrust Canada

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations
$10,000.00
2011

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations
$10,000.00
2011

Ehattesaht Tribe

Ehattesaht Children's Playground

Ehattesaht would like to build a culturally appropriate playground as a safe place for their children to play. This project is being undertaken with the full support of the Ehattesaht Chief and Council and through an an Aboriginal Leadership Initiative called Ahp-cii-uk. The main Ehattesaht reserve is small, with barely enough land for the 15 buildings on the reserve. The community is on Zeballos Inlet but cut off from access to the water by a busy logging road. Children not only cross the road to get to the water but they also play on it because they have no safe alternative. The Chief and Council have approved a site for the playground in the main part of the village, adjacent to the Youth Centre that will also eventually house a Headstart program to increase children’s success in, and attachment to, school. One of the requirements of Headstart is a fenced playground. Chief and Council have also purchased some playground equipmentwhich can be used. The project will result in a safe place for Ehattesaht children to play and contribute to social development activities.
$10,000.00
2011

Elektra Women's Choir

Norwegian Spring

Through the 'Norwegian Spring' project, Elektra's priorities are to learn, to experience cultural and musical exchange, and to share the results with the public at the highest artistic level. Norwegian conductor, Maria Gamborg Helbekkmo, is one of the finest conductors of women's choirs in the world. With decades of exemplary leadership, she is an artist and a teacher and all involved will grow immeasurably from their contact with her. Primarily, the full-length concert format will combine Ms. Edmundson, Artistic Director of Elektra, and Ms. Helbekkmo's presentation of Norwegian, Canadian and other repertoire new to Elektra and to Vancouver audiences through a true artistic, cultural exchange and collaboration. The most important goal of this project will be the fostering of bonds between communities: Elektra (a week long schedule of rehearsal and mentorship), Mira (Elektra's high school mentorship program), local conductors and choristers (BCCF and Kiwanis Music Festival), and choral students from UBC, allowing for observation, robust engagement and social connection.
$10,000.00
2012

Kindred Spirits: Elektra & Shelagh Rogers

This collaboration with CBC journalist Shelagh Rogers combines choral singing with Canadian stories, including those of First Nations women. The full-length concert format will intertwine music and spoken word, with Ms. Rogers sharing the stage with the choir to read letters, fiction and her thoughts. With themes of transformation and reconciliation, the show is structured on the cycle of the seasons with folk songs and original compositions, and will also likely use Canadian photographs to depict the seasons.
$10,000.00
2010

Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver

In the Best Interests of the Child

EFry seeks to raise the issue of homeless women and children through the lens of BC Legislation, and government responsibilities to see that homeless women and children are not disproportionately disadvantaged by their relative small numbers. The project seeks to rationalize resources to see that the most vulnerable - homeless children - are prioritized; and that homeless and at risk of homelessness women are provided equal opportunity to access supports as their male counterparts to find or remain housed. Doing so will reduce the generational legacy of homelessness in the lives of children as they grow, and provide women fairness, equality and opportunity.
$10,000.00
2017

Elizabeth's Wildlife Center Society

TUTT1730 AutoClave

Each year Elizabeth's Wildlife Center takes in birds and animals that need medical treatment. As the center functions with limited volunteers it is essential that medical items be sanitized/sterilized. At the time of this writing there are 13 baby squirrels and 8 baby rabbits that need to be individually fed by tube. All items are being cleaned by hand which is extremely time consuming and takes time away from the care of other animals. In some instances items must be thrown away instead of being reused as they cannot be sterilized. An autoclave would protect the animals medical treatment and would also save the center money by being able to reuse items that would otherwise be thrown away.
$2,261.00
2013

Environmental Youth Alliance

Inner-Nature: Developing a Connected Schoolyard Greening Project

THE SOIL - We will work with at least 3 classes at each of: 2 secondary & 1 elementary schools in Vancouver to pilot innovative, experiential learning in schoolyard green spaces. Our aim will be to find ways to engage students and teachers in learning about urban wildlife and creating schoolyard gardens to house a diversity of wild creatures. These programs will combine wildlife and food garden creation with citizen science programming. Our goal in the development phase of this project is to learn with youth & educators how schools can create and USE biodiverse natural spaces on their grounds. THE SCHOOL INSTITUTION - We will meet quarterly with: youth, administrators at each school, coordinators of Community School Teams, the VSB Sustainability Department, Youth Workers in the SACY program, community partners, and local alternate schools to discuss approaches for creating regular, sustainable nature access for vulnerable students. Together we will draft a template Memorandum of Understanding that the EYA can use as a framework to guide our partnerships with VSB schools and Community Hubs in the future. OUR FRIENDS IN THE VSFN - We will continue to meet with these partners to update them on our work with the school institution, and will seek to include multiple organizations from the VSFN in our work. Together we will set common goals, learn how to effectively collaborate and develop a shared narrative that we can use to broadly communicate our work.
$10,000.00
2015

Equitas - International Centre

Speaking Rights - a participatory human rights education toolkit for BC Youth

Speaking Rights is a human rights education project that engages 13-17 year olds in exploring issues that are important to them as they work together to identify strategies to address discrimination, bullying and exclusion. Through Speaking Rights youth workers and youth are trained on the Speaking Rights Toolkit which is an innovative tool which supports and develops the leadership skills of youth by strengthening their knowledge, skills, values, behavior and attitudes. Youth participate in activities and community projects from the Toolkit which open up a space for dialogue and action on issues such as participation, leadership, active citizenship; self-esteem and relationships; violence and intimidation; rights and responsibilities; gender roles; and exclusion, discrimination and racism. The current toolkit is based on a needs assessment conducted with youth and youth workers in Montreal. With the recent success of this project in Montreal, Equitas partners in BC have asked Equitas to adapt the toolkit to meet the Vancouver context and the needs of youth workers and youth in BC.
$10,000.00
2011

Evergreen Cultural Centre Society

Ancestral Subsistence, Natalie Purschwitz: Exploring Ritual & Collective History

Ancestral Subsistence originated from a desire to involve our community in innovative multidisciplinary art practice. This project will introduce award-winning artist Natalie Purschwitz to Coquitlam, showcase her new work to the lower mainland and engage the general public in participatory performance. Purschwitz is on the forefront of collaborative multidisciplinary art creation. Such practices are becoming more prevalent but there is a belief that they remain inaccessible to those not trained in the arts. We need to further break down barriers by presenting innovative work in a welcoming site such as Evergreen Cultural Centre (ECC). ECC will exhibit key pieces from Natalie Purschwitz's body of work, Trace and Makeshift, as well as her newest work inspired by her international residency at La Cite Internationale des Arts. Purschwitz will create an interactive performance piece, Disambiguation, where she will transform the public's personal items into artwork and engage the public in discourse about contemporary art, sustainability, DIY culture, collaboration and community building.
$8,200.00
2013

Family Services of Greater Vancouver

The Living Wage Investor Project

In Britain, the United States and now in Canada there is increasing support for a ‘living wage’ as a way to ensure that families have enough income to support themselves to develop in a healthy and socially inclusive way. The living wage is about what a family with children would need to earn in order to have an after-tax income that allows it to meet basic needs and to participate in the civic/social life of their community. ‘The Living Wage Investor Project’ aims to broaden and deepen the visibility and effectiveness of the Living Wage for Families campaign in Metro Vancouver by seeking support for paying a living wage from institutional investors (pension funds, mutual funds, investment managers, foundations and endowments). It is hoped that encouraging institutional investors to prioritize investing in companies that pay a living wage will increase the opportunities for families to earn enough income so they don’t have to face impossible choices— such as whether to buy food or heat the house, feed the children or pay the rent.
$4,000.00
2011

First Call - Moving to an Integrated System of Early Care and Learning in BC

First Call - Moving to an Integrated System of Early Care and Learning in BC
$9,500.00
2010

Family Support Institute of B.C.

Personal Information Booklet

When information needs to be shared with team members (gov, health care teams, therapists,...) the end result is often inconsistent & clinical. Parents of children with disabilities find themselves constantly repeating their child’s story. Not only does this add undue stress to the family, it also further perpetuates a non person centered approach to their loved ones' care & they often get described with jargon & labels. This frustration is most apparent during the transition period of a youth’s life when they leave high school and enter adulthood - arguably, the most difficult time in a families' life. A Personal Information Booklet will address these challenges and build cohesive teams.
$10,000.00
2017

Navigating Social and Sexual Relationships

Young adults with disabilities have systemically been excluded in accessing sexuality education tailored to diverse learning needs. Intentional community based sexuality education opportunities for youth with disabilities is necessary to address conflict among educators, service providers and parents about what and how to teach which can leave youth without any sexuality education. Developing healthy sexual expression provides an opportunity to be fully ‘seen’ and communities can address stigma related to recognizing individuals with disabilities as sexual beings. Community based education provides meaningful interaction while supporting responsive, inclusive and welcoming communities.
$10,000.00
2017

Farm Folk / City Folk

Don't Pocket the Potatoes: Addressing Community Garden Theft in Richmond

While Richmond Food Security Society officially manages the community garden program, we work closely with a wide range of stakeholders. While each stakeholder has shared ideas on how to address the issue of community garden theft, we have yet to form an official project team to address this thoroughly and would like to do so. What we would like to do is form a project team who will work together to research possible solutions. This will include a detailed scan of best practices in other communities, resulting in a detailed webpage where Richmond Community gardeners can learn from. We would also like to conduct a survey of gardeners, in at least 3 languages to find out their personal experience with theft and their ideas to address it. This will provide gardeners with a necessary outlet for their concerns. We would also like to compare the thefts from 2015 to physical site characteristics to determine which physical features may deter thefts. We have only been tracking garden theft data for one year, and would like to track it again in 2016 in order to get a better understanding of the scope of this problem. While we only have data for one year, we have anecdotal and media evidence (through articles in the Richmond review dating back to 2013) that this problem is ongoing.
$10,000.00
2015

Federation of BC Youth In Care Networks

BC Child and Youth in Care Week Celebration Bursaries

The Federation has a process that engages youth in and from care as part of a selection committee for grants and bursaries. This year with the upcoming election and BC Child and Youth in Care Week, we would like to provide additional support to young leaders from care in BC and their adult allies who are looking to host community based celebrations, celebrate a BCCYICW award winner or ensure the increased visibility, celebration and engagement of young leaders in non-partisan pre-election activities. The Federation would recruit youth in and from care to sit on a selection committee, review the applications that come in from across the province and recommend grant recipients. The Federation would then process and mail out the payments required. Youth in and from care will have input in the design of the bursary criteria. Finally their involvement will also be tracked towards honorarium payments according to the Federation's policy.
$10,000.00
2017

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