Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Aquafit for All Association

What are the barriers and facilitators to providing inclusive aquatic activities for children with mental health challenges?

Studies have repeatedly shown that inclusive education improves the child's quality of life, health status, as well as income and employment outcomes, all of which are important social determinants of health for children, and contribute to their childhood experience and life trajectory. However, aquatic community programs for children with disabilities are often segregated so that children with mental health challenges are separated from peers. By having a deeper understanding of the barriers and facilitators to inclusive aquatic programming in the community, we can work with co-researchers and the broader community to expand inclusion practices to programs beyond aquatics.
$19,100.00
2019

Archway Community Services

Accessing Food for People with Lived or Living Experience of Homelessness

A key contributor to health is having enough and consistent nutritious food to eat.People with lived or living experience of homelessness (PLLEH) are at risk of poorer physical and mental health due to inter-related housing, employment & food insecurity.PPLEH are often omitted from national household food security surveys as they focus on households with a fixed address.This research project will include qualitative focus group discussions which will inform the development and use of a quantitative survey questionnaire. This research will inform local interventions for those experiencing food insecurity and will produce insights into food security issues among PPLEH throughout BC and beyond.
$20,000.00
2022

BC Association of Pregnancy Outreach Programs

Identifying Barriers for Pregnancy Outreach Programs to Engage and Retain Pregnant Participants in BC

Engaging with hard-to-reach pregnant participants has always been a priority for POP workers as they work towards improving health outcomes for the most vulnerable and marginalized. Challenges have only been exacerbated due to years of under-funding and the pandemic. In collaboration with the Centre for Excellence in Women’s Health, BCAPOP will work alongside our community to begin to unpack the complex health issues surrounding the urgent questions being brought forward about the significant decrease in pregnant people accessing POPs. We will develop a research question and create participatory action research plan to access further funding.
$20,000.00
2022

British Columbia Brain Injury Association

What are the rehabilitation and research priorities for improving quality of life among people with TBI?

Over 300,000 people live with traumatic brain injury (TBI). After injury, people experience many physical, cognitive, and mental health problems, which can last from months to a lifetime and significantly impact their quality of life. Additionally, family members, carers, and friends of people with TBI experience changes in their life due to the new roles and commitments caused by the person’s injury. Our goal is to bring together researchers, clinicians, people with TBI, carers, and policy makers to 1) develop key priority areas for rehabilitation and research, and 2) initiate transformative community rehabilitation to improve quality of life for individuals and carers after TBI.
$20,000.00
2020

Community-Based Research Centre Society

“Why not my whole self?” Exploring health system navigation for 2SLGBTQ+ people living with chronic health conditions

The COVID-19 pandemic has made clear and exacerbated the barriers that 2SLGBTQ+ people living with chronic health conditions face. How do our communities understand and navigate the health care system in BC, and what is needed for the health care system to view, understand and appreciate our whole selves? Informed by principles of disability justice, we will build an advisory circle of people with lived experiences, and build a framework for research practices grounded in access, anti-racism, and anti-oppression. We hope this framework can be a model for qualitative research by and for communities experiencing intersectional oppression.
$20,000.00
2022

Great Zimbabwe Cultural Society of BC

How Social Determinants of Health Contribute to Deteriorating Health of Black Immigrant Communities in Vancouver

The deterioration of black African immigrants' health (Healthy Immigrant Effect) and the associated high poverty rates require empirical research to be better understood. Although hospitalization statistics exist, other health issues are underreported for several reasons, thus distorting the data. Culture seems to be one of the reasons. Certain ailments are considered minor, and people don't seek timely intervention. Some of these illnesses include diet-related illness and sleep disorders. Additionally, there is a stigma surrounding conditions like stress, depression, mental health, and HIV, so people only seek medical attention when they have no other choice.
$20,000.00
2022

Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia

Social Connectivity in the time of COVID-19: A participatory needs assessment from the experience of racialized newcomers in Burnaby

We aim to understand how Burnaby can increase social connectivity, especially for recent newcomers from racialized communities. Through the collaboration of community members, service providers, and researchers, we aim to understand community members’ recent social experiences, the role of community programming, barriers to social connectivity, and opportunities for innovation. This project is urgent and important, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, because the learnings will be applied to improve existing service delivery, coordination of services, and implementation of new programs, ultimately boosting social connectivity and enhancing wellbeing in Burnaby.
$20,000.00
2020

Kamloops Food Policy Council

Evaluating Collective Action in the Kamloops Regional Food System

This project aims to understand how to collectively move food policies with positive health outcomes from plan to action. Much thought and engagement has been put into policies and plans in our region that provide a pathway towards a healthy and regenerative food system. However, a gap between the adoption of plans and their implementation has been identified by researchers and planners. As a result, we are first seeking to understand the role that community engagement and civic inclusion can play in supporting the implementation of policy. Secondly, we will explore how to authentically measure what matters to see what impact our efforts have.
$20,000.00
2018

McCreary Centre Society

A youth led investigation of BC adolescents’ substance use

The McCreary Centre Society and the Vancouver Aboriginal Child and Family Services Society are seeking to convene a group of young people who want to better understand how social determinants of health impact underage substance use among BC youth and how these can be addressed. Together the young people will develop specific research questions which can be answered with an in-depth analysis of data from the 2018 BC Adolescent Health Survey. The project aims to include those most likely to be impacted by harmful substance use in the design of a research project which can inform systems planning to reduce substance-related harms among BC youth.
$20,000.00
2019

MEFM Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Fibromyalgia Society of British Columbia

Examining the Unmet Needs of British Columbians living with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Mapping a Provincial Needs Assessment

This project examines British Columbians living with a disabling and neglected chronic illness, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) to better understand ME patients’ health and social services needs. It aims to inform policy decision making, and to improve patient care and support. The Convene Grant process allows for community, research, clinical, and decision-makers to partner in the development of a provincial ME needs assessment framework and Investigative Grant proposal. The project will identify key stakeholders, data sources and methodology appropriate to this patient population. Project analysis and reporting will outline next steps to maximise a larger project in the future.
$19,975.00
2020

Nanaimo Region John Howard Society

Engaging the power of community: Recovery, reintegration and healthy lifestyles.

By engaging Guthrie Alumni’s skills and knowledge we will explore the systemic gaps that may exist between health and social recovery. We will examine the role of social networks in alumni recovery that may or may not lead them back into systems of addiction/incarceration. The project has ramifications for health and justice systems responses to addiction. We aim to understand the activities of the informal network that maintains Alumni’s health recovery and social success. In this phase we will collaboratively refine key issues and processes to enable the autonomous participation of Alumni. This work will help us plan a future project on systemic change to post incarceration recovery.
$20,000.00
2020

Okanagan College

A Community Approach to Building a Lived Experience Circle

Homelessness negatively impacts the health of individuals and communities, however the voice of people with lived experience (PWLE) of homelessness is absent in policy and programmatic decisions. This research looks to support a Penticton Lived Experience Circle on Homelessness (PLECoH) to systematically include these missing voices. An interdisciplinary research team including representation from PWLE, local first nations, and other key stakeholders will host a series of focus groups to understand how and when the voices of PWLE can be included in policy and decisions. Results will be validated by stakeholders with the recommendations provided to the community.
$18,610.00
2022

Pacific AIDS Network

Small Urban, Rural and Remote (SURR) Harm Reduction: Research development for innovators on the frontlines

There is a need to better understand best practices in harm reduction services in small urban, rural and remote communities. Likewise, barriers to harm reduction in these communities exist in the form of systemic behaviours, including stigma, geographic inequities (I.e. long travel times, few providers in home community) and lack of resourcing. This is underscored by the high rates of overdose in small communities throughout BC. Through development of a cross-provincial, virtual Working Group of community partners, we intend to learn from each other and identify research questions that will lead to systemic change for people who use drugs in BC’s small urban, rural and remote communities.
$20,000.00
2022

Pacific Immigrant Resources Society

Social Determinants of Food Health for Immigrant and Refugee Women in BC

Nutrition and community participation are crucial to immigrant and refugee women’s physical and mental health and sense of belonging and agency. However, they face challenges of a new country and food system and systemic barriers (e.g. income, trauma, literacy, childcare). Our project examines social determinants of food access, food literacy, and food system participation. Led by immigrant and refugee women, we centre lived experiences to understand systemic behaviours and use policy research to identify gaps. Our research culminates in action plans to reduce food-related barriers for immigrant and refugee women through culturally relevant, trauma-informed, and community-based practices.
$20,000.00
2022

Qmunity BC's Queer Resource Centre Society

Speaking truth to abuse: LGBTQ elders share their stories of elder abuse and survival

LGBT seniors are at greater risk for elder abuse than their heterosexual counterparts, since they share many risk factors, some of which are connected to historic cultural prejudices. The situation is made worse because many LGBT people mistrust a health care system that has historically ignored their concerns. In this project, we will seek out survivors of LGBT elder abuse, collect their stories, and disseminate them in order to generate greater understanding of the issue among both lay people and professionals. This grant will help us apply for funding, design our project, recruit community members as patient partners, and consider ways to support survivors throughout our project.
$10,000.00
2019

Royal Roads University

A good life with dementia: collective action to enable wellbeing in the CRD

Social action to shift negative definitions and inaccurate assumptions about people with dementia is required in the CRD, as the number of people living with dementia is expected to grow in all municipalities of the region. The Centre for Health Leadership and Research at Royal Roads University and the Alzheimer Society of BC, together with people living with dementia and other community stakeholders, will convene a process of cooperative inquiry to develop the CRD as a good place to live with dementia. People living with dementia will be supported to participate as full citizens in an active role as ‘place makers’ to inform development of networked, dementia-capable communities.
$16,805.00
2019

Simon Fraser University

Eng/aging and HIV: Knowledge Exchange Between Administrative Data Study and Older Adults Living with HIV in British Columbia

To an unprecedented degree in the history of HIV/AIDS, people with HIV are living longer thanks to treatment and there is a need to understand the complexity of aging with HIV by those who live this actuality. This project engages older adults living with HIV, a care provider, and other researchers to convene as a research council. We will co-develop a research plan to examine the recent issue of aging and HIV while using an administrative health data study called COAST at the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Through our Convene process, we honour the perspectives and living experiences of older adults living with HIV to shape the research questions and plan of action.
$19,480.00
2020

Sources Community Resource Society

Food Justice Convening for Surrey

Food insecurity holds a significant negative impact on individual health outcomes. Individuals experiencing food insecurity are more likely to report poor or fair self-rated health, poor functional health, restricted activity, and multiple chronic conditions. (Vozoris and Tarasuk, 2003). As part of the process, SOCS will use an Anti-Black Racism Analysis similar to the one developed by the City of Toronto to confront anti-Black racism. SOCS strives to achieve dialogue-based decision making, where open and informed discussion can build a common understanding and inform the best route forward. Through Collective Impact, SOCS strives to create an environment wherein all voices are respected.
$13,440.00
2022

Stroke Recovery Association Of British Columbia

World Cafe - Community Conversations After Stroke

Stroke is a sudden event which challenges participation in life roles. Addressing this issue is challenged within our province that has geographical, cultural, and service related diversity. Our research will help these diverse communities to understand what stroke survivors and their community need, and the approaches that they think are required to meet these needs, recognising their specific circumstances . Only then can meaningful development of support and services take place. Our collaborative approach which identifies and brings together stakeholders will start the process of partnership development. We will apply for further funding to support and implement the research findings.
$20,000.00
2019

T. Buck Suzuki Environmental Foundation

The Thriving Coastal Communities Initiative

Coastal communities in BC are facing a number of pressing challenges that are affecting the health and well-being of local people. These challenges include climate change, loss of community infrastructure, competition over marine space, loss of access to fisheries and complex marine management plans. Local communities can feel the impacts of these pressures in very real ways through loss of livelihoods, declining economies, outmigration of youth, loss of food security, and health challenges. It is important that coastal communities continue to thrive and maintain an active presence on the water. This participatory action research project asks “How can coastal communities continue to thrive?”
$20,000.00
2018

University of British Columbia

Understanding of Pregnancy Experiences of First Nations Women with Gestational Diabetes in the Nuu-Chah-Nulth communities

Our proposed project aligns with the goals of the Convene Grants. The overall objective of the proposed project is to improve maternal health status, especially women with gestational diabetes living in the NTC communities. By understanding the gestational diabetes issue, we can generate recommendations to support and improve patient experiences and clinical outcomes and increase access to diabetes education and training. The results from the planning and focus group study phase will be used to apply for a multi-year large intervention grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
$19,888.00
2020

A participatory framework to support the social-emotional wellbeing of children in the early years: Developing a sustainable, coordinated and strength-based system

In British Columbia, we are observing a worrying trend of increasing numbers of young children with social-emotional vulnerabilities. Children who experience social-emotional vulnerabilities during the early years of life are susceptible to a number of negative health and social outcomes across the lifespan. Our project will convene a diverse participant network in three BC communities to develop a community-based participatory action research agenda to address systemic influences on children’s social-emotional vulnerability.
$20,000.00
2020

Community-led Options for Access to Substitution Therapies (COAST) Project

Our team is working to understand the impacts of community cannabis programs (CCPs) on the lives of people who use drugs (PWUD) amidst dual public health crises—the opioid crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic. Many PWUD are using cannabis from CCPs to reduce other substance use, withdrawal symptoms, and cravings, which in turn helps to reduce harms. The Convene Grant will bring together leading researchers on substance use, people with lived experience, CCP coordinators, and policy makers, to co-develop a research plan to study the impacts of CCPs on PWUD, which will help create well-informed policies and practices and empower community-led organizations to support their communities.
$17,796.70
2020

Truth (through art) to power: Arts-based truth-telling to transform research and reduce inequities at the intersections of health and justice

Health and social inequities faced by Indigenous Peoples are linked to criminal justice inequities. A partnership between the UBC Transformative Health & Justice Research Cluster and Megaphone Magazine will host writing workshops, and a subsequent public truth-telling series where people affected by the criminal justice system will share their stories towards destigmatization and empowerment. Stakeholders and researchers will be invited, and a graphic recorder and filmmaker will visually collect themes. This series will provide a roadmap to shape research priorities and the development of PAR funding applications that address social, health and criminal justice inequities.
$19,903.44
2020

Addressing Homelessness in Kelowna: Establishing Participatory Action Research Priorities

Individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, experience higher morbidity and mortality than the general population. Previous research has shown that people who are homeless consume more health care resources than the general population in particular emergency room visits and 911 services. Once health issues become chronic, reversing the problem can be costly and time consuming. Preventing homelessness prevents poor health outcomes downstream. Our series of meetings with key stakeholders will identify research possibilities aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of innovative community-based prevention interventions among at-risk individuals.
$19,917.00
2019

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