Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Archway Community Services

The Bridge Canine Care Program

The idea for this project originated with Diane Benaroch wanting to open a doggie day care and employ people with developmental disabilities to work at the doggie day care. Diane was concerned about the training of the individuals and how that would work. Diane met with the staff from the EPIC program with Abbotsford Community Services in May of 2014 where it was decided that a training program should be developed first and foremost. Through this project, we are hoping to build a bridge between people with developmental disabilities, dog trainers, and dog owners. The participants in this project will learn how to care for and train dogs and through the interactions they have with people involved in the canine industry will build relationships and connections that will provide them with jobs, friends and mentors.
$17,680.00
2014

High Road Services Society

Innovations' Kitchen

Innovations' Kitchen is a social enterprise jointly managed by the Supported Employment Program and Special Projects program of HIGH ROAD Services Society. Innovations' Kitchen(IKitchen) operates five days a week in the cafeteria space of the local high school, providing nutritious snack and meal options prepared by the individuals employed part time by IKitchen. The individuals receive instruction and support in learning industry standard skills that can be transferable to other employment settings. Employers often do not have the time or resources to provide one on one continual training supports for individuals with disabilities. IKitchen removes this obstacle by providing on the job training in the areas desired by potential employers, while providing a fair wage for the individuals. Individuals are instructed in Food Safe and Health and Safety procedures while experiencing realistic employment expectations such as being on time for scheduled shifts, following an appropriate hygiene routine, working coherently with coworkers and completing tasks according to direction given.
$10,000.00
2014

Kickstart Disability Arts and Culture

The Fine Line Project

The Fine Line Project is a series of cutting edge art events in the burgeoning field of disability arts. The theme for this series is a Fine Line, referring to the hazy boundaries in disability art, the line between therapy and art that heals; the line between individual production and art with assistance; the line between acoustic musicianship and technologically assisted music. Kickstart wants to take this opportunity to examine the particular boundaries disabled artists face. Through partnership with the Art House in the Field Collective and Vancouver Adapted Music Society, we are able to present readings, music, talks and workshops in an intimate accessible venue (Slocan Hall) that is a thriving neighbourhood centre for the arts. This project emerges from our multidisciplinary festival experience, and represents a change in delivery of programming, increasing our year-round visibility while maintaining our goal to present authentic non-sentimental expressions of the disability experience.
$13,000.00
2014

Inclusion Langley Society

Youth Works

The initiative proposes to provide support to twenty secondary school students to secure part-time and after school employment. The supports will offer students in grades 10-12, including youth who are transitioning out of high school. The employment specialists, in collaboration with the school and family will engage in a discovery process in which students abilities will be observed in the students' work experience environment. This process will ascertain the students' abilities and potential employment choices to ensure a successful employment match. Once employment has been established, employment specialists will provide support to the employer and student with training, job coaching, continued support and monitoring to ensure the satisfaction of the employer and success of the employee. Securing part-time and after school employment is the most potent support we can offer students to ease the transition to adult life. Offering students the opportunity to have a robust resume & paid employment experience, provides them with a greater opportunity to obtain competitive employment.
$15,000.00
2014

Learning Disabilities Society of Greater Vancouver

Learning Employment and Education Program

The Leadership Employment and Education Program (LEEP) is a leadership and employment training program for youth (14-17) with Learning Disabilities. The program's goal is twofold: 1) to broaden each young person's understanding of their individual Learning Disability diagnosis and to enhance their skills as advocates of their needs in the workplace, 2) to provide each youth with employment training, and volunteer work placements that will prepare them for the workplace. Youth with Learning Disabilities face very specific challenges. The program is designed to help them explore these issues with others who experience the same battles, to build a sense of community with others, and to deepen their understanding and appreciation for their uniqueness. Youth will graduate from the LEEP program with a new sense of awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, newfound confidence in their abilities and unique talents, and a better ability to communicate their needs.
$10,000.00
2014

The Garth Homer Society

Supported Self-Employment Pilot Project

The purpose of this pilot is to develop and validate a practical working approach to supported self-employment (SSE) for people with developmental disabilities (DD), one of the most vulnerable and excluded of populations. Increasingly, SSE is being viewed within the community living sector as a viable employment option. However, there are few models for the delivery of SSE for people with DD, and for a variety of reasons existing models of self-employment for the 'difficult-to-employ' without disabilities do not work well for this population. In this project we will work with six developmentally disabled individuals to build self-employment businesses with the aims of (i) having the businesses generate cashflow within the project term, (ii) achieving specific employment-related learning and personal growth outcomes for each individual, and (iii) establishing the validity and practicality of our SSE service model.
$10,000.00
2014

Thompson Rivers University Foundation

Retail Kiosk Project

The ESTR Retail Kiosk Project is a new and innovative initiative for our Retail Certificate Program. The purpose of this initiative is to provide hands-on, retail training for our students which will empower and better prepare them for employment. Students in the program are required to complete 6 hours of Retail Labs each week over the course of two semesters. Currently students are working on and off campus to complete their lab hours. The kiosk would provide students the opportunity to connect classroom theory to real employment training and practice such as: - operating a small business and entrepreneuship - ordering and monitoring inventory - pricing and marketing product - stocking, displaying and packaging product - completing sales transactions and daily reconciliations - practicing customer service and sales This project also extends beyonds our program. Along with being interdisciplinary, aligns well with TRU's Strategic Priorities to increase: Student Success, Entrepreneurial Capacity, Intercultural Understanding, and Sustainability.
$10,000.00
2014

Vancouver Adapted Music Society

The Strong Sessions Music Series

Following up on VAMS recent, highly successful The Strong Sessions recording project, wherein over 20 VAMS members wrote, recorded and performed some amazing music, the project will work with music venues to establish a series of concerts featuring VAMS members. The intention is to feature VAMS members at clubs, bars and other public venues, exposing a broader sector of the concert-going public to the talents of musicians with disabilities. The project will offer opportunities for experienced VAMS performers to showcase their music, as well as enable those who are new to performing to do so in a supported environment, where their accessibility needs have been arranged for. Over the course of 12 months, ten "VAMS Nights" will be staged, offering audiences a chance to appreciate music written and performed by people with significant physical disabilities. At these gigs, VAMS will offer information about inclusion and accessibility, promote the recordings of VAMS members and engage other musicians interested in collaborating on future performances and recordings.
$15,000.00
2014