Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

BC SPCA Strategic Plan 2014-2018

In 2013, the BC SPCA will undertake a comprehensive province-wide stakeholder and public consultation process to assist in the development and approval of a strategic plan for 2014 through 2018. Once approved, the new strategic plan will define the organization’s direction and prioritize programming and the allocation of resources for that five year period. The process will also include an evaluation of the BC SPCA’s current Mission, Vision and Charter, as well as the Guiding Principles and strategic objectives.
$10,000.00
2012

Improving the Welfare of Cats in BC SPCA Shelters

The BC SPCA operates on evidence-based programs that apply the outcomes of scientific research to improving the welfare of animals throughout BC. In our continued effort to maintain the highest levels of welfare possible, we will be converting ouo current cat cages into larger enclosures at 33 of our shelters. The latest animal welfare research by Dr. Kate Hurley, Director of Shelter Medicine at University of California Davis (UC Davis) and the North America leader in cat research, states that cats must have a minimum of 11 square feet per cage for optimum welfare. Current BC SPCA cages average only 5.5 feet. To improve this situation, we will be combining our current cages using cost effective method development by UC Davis. By installing a circular polyvinyl chloride (PVC) portal, two cages can be joined, transforming a single stainless steel cage into double compartment cage units that a cat can easily travel between.
$12,000.00
2011

British Columbia's Children's Hospital Foundation

Health Transitions for Youth in Care

Given the acute and lifelong health vulnerability for youth in care, it is vital to have the health sector as a leader in promoting health and wellness in this population. This project will improve connections between the health sector and youth transitioning out of care through participatory research with youth that will guide development of an interactive workshop, transition toolkit and health navigator program. The proposed project will use a grassroots, strength based, youth driven framework to improve long term health and wellness outcomes and reduce negative health outcomes. There are 2 phases. Phase 1 will contribute empirical data from youth transitioning from care.. Youth will participate in an interactive workshop followed by qualitative interviews over the course of 6 months as youth turn 19, to gather data about the health related barriers and facilitators available to youth. Results will inform further intervention development and dissemination in phase 2. Developed with youth and stakeholder input and input from phase 1, phase 2 involves information technology, so that youth all over BC will have access. It will also pilot a peer navigation program of youth paired with a health student (medical students, nursing students, etc) to assist with health related access to care. Health navigators will build health and wellness life skills including but not limited to access to family physician, blood work, prescriptions, and/or gym access.
$15,000.00
2015

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Exploring Marginalized Women's Physical Activity and Inactivity in BC - Development Phase

BC Women’s is requesting seed funding to support, in partnership with Promotion Plus (PPlus), BCCEWH's development of a community-based research (CBR) and knowledge exchange project on the social determinants of physical activity and inactivity for marginalized women in BC. The need for this project developed from previous research, knowledge syntheses, interventions, and policy dialogues conducted by BCCEWH and PPlus, all of which identified the need for community-engaged explorations of how to improve marginalized women’s opportunities for physical activity and health promotion. This pilot project focuses on a series of community consultation processes to inform the development of a more comprehensive proposal. During this development stage, our goals are to: 1) establish a Provincial Advisory Committee (PAC), 2) identify three diverse communities as sites for Participatory Action Research (PAR) projects, and 3) formulate a Community of Practice (CoP) inclusive of diverse women, service providers, policy-makers, and researchers interested in ongoing province-wide knowledge development, mutual learning, and action. These activities will provide the necessary groundwork and relationship building with community-based stakeholders across BC to inform the submission of a full research proposal and undertake a more robust community-based participatory research project.
$10,000.00
2010

Burnaby Art Gallery Association (City of Burnaby)

Chronicles of Form and Place: Works on Paper by Takao Tanabe

The Tanabe exhibition, publication and online resource will be a lasting contribution to the art historical record, especially in the context of an important Canadian artist continuing to produce work in Canada. Tanabe’s unusual dexterity in a variety of media will make the touring show of some 75 drawings, watercolours and collages reflect key themes and conceptual shifts the artist has been engaged with during his career.
$20,000.00
2011

Burnaby Community Connections Society Burnaby Community Services

System Navigation for Burnaby’s Working Poor

10% of Burnaby residents are working but still living in poverty. They are struggling with low wages, under-employment and a high cost of living. The patchwork of available programs are hard to access and aren’t enough to help them break the cycle of poverty. To empower people with low incomes to change their lives, this project will test a supportive self-advocacy approach, including training on navigating the system, coaching on employment and housing, a community of practice, peer-to-peer mentoring, transportation assistance and temporary housing if needed. To promote system change, a Steering Committee composed of system representatives will share and act on the learnings.
$10,000.00
2017

Burnaby Seniors Outreach Services Society

ManTalk

The ManTalk project aims to reduce social isolation and expand a faltering support network for the most vulnerable of the oldest-old population in our community, men who are not able to independently change their own situations. Facilitated group activities which include education, discussion and emotional support will be established in community and residential venues designed to foster new social connections and encourage meaningful activity.
$10,175.00
2012

Burns Lake Band

Children are our Future

This new playground for the Little Angels Daycare will create a safe, fenced area which will contain various play equipment which meets safety standards and designed for ages 3 and under. Playgrounds provide crucial and vital opportunities for children to play. Research has proven that there is a link between play and brain development, motor-skills, and social capabilities. All learning—emotional, social, motor and cognitive—is accelerated, facilitated, and fueled by the pleasure of play. Age appropriate playgrounds promote different types of play that are vital for a child’s cognitive, emotional, physical, and social development Research shows that children with poorly developed motor-skills by age five will likely never develop efficient motor-skills, outdoor play seems to be an important way to help with these skills. Playgrounds offer infants and toddlers a base for simple motor and exercise play to provide an environment to help develop these skills. Most importantly playgrounds have no racial boundaries and can help reduce racial tension in communities, large or small.
$15,000.00
2012

Canadian Animal Assistance Team

Strategic Communications & Marketing for the Canadian Animal Assistance Team

The expansion of our marketing strategy would include: - Improvements to the current web site content and functionality to ensure a current and compelling experience for members and those being introduced to the organization for the first time. The website serves as CAAT's online hub, for education, information sharing and fundraising during periods inbetween signature events. - Expansion of our social media presence to more effectively share what our organization is doing and to support and create opportunities for dirent connections with our followers, with clear, simple calls to action to get involved in the work of CAAT by joining missions or through financial or in-kind donations. - Expansion of our education and awareness materials (pamphlets, posters, and wallet cards) and increase distribution of that material.
$10,000.00
2014

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Getting it right: structuring, implementing & evaluating an effective poverty-reduction plan for BC

Thousands of British Columbians experience poverty and struggle to care for their children, participate in their communities and fulfill their aspirations. Our 2008 report, A Poverty Reduction Plan for BC, identified the key elements of an effective public policy strategy to significantly reduce and eventually eliminate poverty. We seek to build on this work and meaningfully engage with BC’s new government as they launch a basic income pilot and develop a poverty reduction plan. A well-designed, transparent and accountable strategy that targets the root causes of poverty has the potential to be game-changing and greatly improve the health and well-being of communities across the province.
$10,000.00
2017

Addressing Inequities at the Intersection of Health and Climate Change (Co-lead researchers: Marc Lee, CCPA; Tim Takaro, SFU

This proposal is for a $10,000 development grant to explore how health, equity and climate change can be addressed in an integrated way that benefits vulnerable populations and communities. Since 2009, CCPA has been leading, in partnership with the University of British Columbia, a major academic-community research and engagement collaboration called the Climate Justice Project: Paths to an Equitable and Sustainable BC Economy (CJP). This proposed research project emerged out of a growing interest from multiple CJP partners to explore the potential for climate change mitigation and adaption strategies to also address determinants of health and health inequities. While a lot of research recognizes healthy environments and a healthy climate are important determinants of health, a more fulsome look at how climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies impact health inequities is needed. We are proposing to use this development grant to accomplish three broad goals: i) conduct preliminary research and review of existing, BC-specific, policy links between climate justice and health; ii) build capacities for collaboration and connectedness within and across diverse communities and sectors such as social justice, health, environmental and academic sectors and (iii) define specific research questions to be explored further in a collaborative community based research project. Reserach Team Member: Kerri Klien, Provincial Facilitator
$10,000.00
2012

Canadian Mental Health Association - BC Division

Social Innovation for Social Inclusion of Vulnerable Populations

Social Innovation for Social Inclusion of Vulnerable Populations
$10,000.00
2014

Developing Socially Inclusive Strategies: Policy Implications of Innovative Community Programming - A Knowledge Exchange Event

$12,782.85
2013

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

Ensuring Accessibility for British Columbians with Vision Loss

Canada is a prosperous and technologically advanced society yet many Canadians with vision loss are excluded from social and economic opportunities. The lack of skills training and support results in 65% unemployment of working age adults with vision loss and 50% earning less than $20,000 annually. The harsh reality is only 45% of blind or partially sighted Canadian children graduate high school compared to 90% of sighted kids. To tackle these challenges, CNIB Specialists train those with vision loss to access information using assistive devices. These devices coupled with the skills taught by CNIB Specialists increases self-reliance, personal capacity and the ability to be productive, contributing community members. Our project, Ensuring Accessibility for British Columbians with Vision Loss, ensures no one in our province with vision loss is denied the fundamental right to access information. With your support we will expand our stock of assistive devices to eliminate our wait list and meet the increasing demand for vision rehabilitation services and equipment in British Columbia.
$20,000.00
2014

Canadian Nurses Foundation

BC Indigenous Community Based Mentorship Program Supporting Indigenous Nurses for Success

Indigenous Peoples are committed to advancing the health and wellness of communities. Given the current health care crisis, the numbers and retention of Indigenous nurses must increase to provide needed culturally safe care. A BC Indigenous community based mentorship program proposes strategies to ensure success of Indigenous nursing students and retention of employed Indigenous nurses. Partnerships with Indigenous community leaders and organizations, and BC schools of nursing will build on a community needs based framework. Ensuring Indigenous peoples are fully represented in healthcare roles, has far-reaching implications for the health of Indigenous individuals and communities.
$10,000.00
2017

Canucks Autism Network Society

Golden Eagles Berries - Work Placement

This is CAN's pilot paid work placement program and part of the Aging with Autism series. Our intention is to support the aging autism demographic through volunteer placement, job readiness coaching and supervised work placement. This initial program will be one week long where participants will be supervised and assessed by a Site Coordinator and 1:1 Workers both in the plant and in the fields. We anticipate the assessments will indicate that 50% of the participants will move on to finding work opportunities outside of CAN. We intend to use this as a model for other programs adjusted according to the community needs and local resources throughout BC.
$14,100.00
2011

Caravan Farm Theatre

The Trail's End: Caravan Farm Theatre's 2011-12 Commissioning Project

Caravan Farm Theatre is seeking support for the commissioning, development, and production of a new play called The Trail’s End, taking place in 1933 small-town BC during the Great Depression. A poor young man and woman fall in love and share dreams of escaping their small-town existence. They begin to commit petty crimes and rise to fame as notorious bank robbers, offering the audience two thematic questions: to what lengths would you go to achieve your dreams? And, in the face of adversity, what is the price of freedom?
$20,000.00
2011

Caravan World Rhythms Society

Sufi Voices and Dance, from Azerbaijan to Iran & Canada

Caravan will present a week of activity around the visit of world-famous singers Alim Qasimov and his daughter Ferghana, from Azerbaijan. They perform traditional spiritual music heavily influenced by Sufi traditions. They are part of the Aga Khan Foundation's Cultural Trust, and recognized by UNESCO as a cultural treasure. Their visit will come on the heels of the Museum of Anthropology's exhibit of Middle-eastern art. We will host the Qasimovs during the week of September 24-29, and organize various activities around their visit, including: - Major concert at the Chan Centre on September 28 featuring the Qasimov group and a local Sufi music and dance group, led by Iranian musician Ali Razmi and Sufi dancer Raqib Burke. The concert will include new compositions by the group, and two pieces with the Qasimovs. - Film showing of 'WAJD', about sufi music and dance made by Vancouver-based film-makerof Syrian background: Amar Chebib. www.salamfilms.com plus a post-film talk. - Two Lecture-demos by the performers at the Ismaili Centre in Burnaby, and at the MOA at UBC.
$17,500.00
2013

Carnegie Community Centre Association

Our Community Vision for Mental Health

The project is based on the recognition that housing is a primary and fundamental social determinant of mental health. It seeks to give low-income Downtown Eastside residents living with mental illness, trauma, and disability the power to contribute to—and seek knowledge about—their health by developing a new “residents first” approach to supportive housing provision and management. Their influence is integral to bettering social housing. We will facilitate spaces to draft and establish best practices and guidelines for meeting and decision-making. We observe an urgent need to work well in coalition, in good communication with other organizations, groups, networks, and services and we can contribute to their longevity. Part of our work will be to strengthen our community member's capacity to participate in decision-making structures. Through visual description, creative form, mapping, media we will address language barriers related to literacy and translation. We can influence the representation of our community. This work will advance our knowledge of supportive housing provision. Amplifying residents' voices and experience informed and grounded in the experience and needs of existing and future social housing residents. As a peer-led project, this plan will have at its core the fundamental belief that people living with mental illness, addictions, and poverty should be able to make basic decisions concerning the day-to-day activities in their lives and homes.
$10,000.00
2016

Carousel Theatre for Young People

The Wondrous Tales of Old Japan

In April 2014 Carousel Theatre for Young People (CTYP) will stage The Wondrous Tales of Old Japan by David Furumoto. We are increasingly aware of the diversity of our young audiences, and we feel a responsibility to reflect and honour that diversity. The Wondrous Tales represents our first step in this direction. The script explores the folklore of Japan through Kabuki, shadow puppetry and Japanese taiko drumming. Tales include: Momotaro: The Peach Boy, Urashimatoro: The Enchanted Fisherman, Yuki Onna: The Snow Woman, and Hanasaka Jiji: The Old Man That the Trees Bloom. The project will also provide the opportunity for our company to actively engage the Japanese community in Vancouver, seek out new partnerships, and foster new relationships. In addition, CTYP will offer community workshops in shadow puppetry, drumming and kabuki during the run as a means of educating and engaging our audiences.
$20,000.00
2013

Carrier Sekani Tribal Council

Dakelh Language Teacher/Elder in Residence at Aboriginal Choice School

The purpose of this project is to bring a Dakelh language teacher/elder-in-residence program to Carney Hill Elementary School, which will become the Prince George Aboriginal Choice School in September 2010. The elder will act as a culturally supportive person to the entire school population and teach the Dakelh language in an immersion style within the Strongstart classroom.
$17,500.00
2010

Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources

Indigenous Watershed Initiatives and Co-Governance Arrangements:A British Columbia Systematic Review

CIER and the BC First Nations Fisheries Council (FNFC) are partnering to undertake a systematic review of indigenous watershed initiatives and co-governance arrangements to contribute to shaping the future of watershed planning and a new watershed governance regime in BC. As CIER and FNFC both work with First Nations, this idea originated from a conversation to understand and build BCFN capacity around watershed planning initiatives and co-governance arrangements. First Nations can play a critical role in the protection of water for fish and healthy aquatic ecosystems. The BC Water Sustainability Act (2014) has created an opportunity for watershed co-governance regime between the BC Government and BCFNs with their respective neighbours. This project serves to inform existing and future co-governance discussions by providing an accurate picture of the current needs and opportunities for BCFNs to advance a co-governance discussion with the Province and local governments. The FNFC intends to use this project to help build capacity for informed water decision-making among BCFNs to protect water for fish and healthy aquatic ecosystems. Through a series of activities, this initiative will identify BCFNs that are well placed and/or already interested in pursuing watershed planning and/or participating in co-governance discussions to share experiences, continue or start building relationships and/or further explore possible solutions/models for BC co-governance arrangements.
$11,250.00
2015

Our Water - Our Future

The project, “Our Water – Our Future”: First Nation Youth Water Leaders Creating Change is a 2 year program to empower and enable Indigenous youth to assume positions of leadership on water issues by providing them with the tools to protect water, supporting them with access to network of existing dynamic, prominent water leaders, and inspiring them with water learning experiences. 16 you the from a First Nations in each of the 4 main watersheds of Canada (Pacific, Arctic, Atlantic and Hudson Bay) have been chosen. Each community will host a week-long water leadership training workshop. During and between the workshops, youth will design and implement (with CIER help) and share personal action plans to address local water challenges. We are seeking a Vancouver Foundation Community Grant to support our Pacific watershed workshop (workshop #2). The workshop will be located on the Similkameen River in Keremeos, BC and will involve understanding and exploring water issues that affect the Similkameen, Okanagan, and Columbia rivers and, ultimately the health of the Pacific watershed.
$20,000.00
2013

Cetus Research & Conservation Society

Towards the development of a marine mammal conservation and education program

Our mission is to protect the lives of whales living in or transiting through Johnstone & Georgia Straits while at the same time educating the public about their responsibilities while on the water. Through our programs Straitwatch and Robson Bight Wardens, we engage directly with the public, alerting them to their impact on whales and other marine mammals. We also intervene directly, diverting pleasure and fishing boats from, intentionally or not, harassing or endangering whales. Recreational boating along the BC coast is steadily increasing. This has created an almost untenable situation for the region's orcas and other cetaceans. Death and injury by propellers and abandoned fishing gear, endless noise, disruption of travelling pods and sleep lines, and the relentless invasion of their space has created an ever-more precarious existence for these animals, whose abilities to thrive or even exist are already under threat from over-fishing and climate change. In order to ensure these animals' ability to survive and prosper, it is crucial not only to continue our efforts to inform the public and protect the whales directly; we must also shift the paradigm through which we perceive our relationship with and responsibility to wildlife. Our intention is to broaden the spectrum of those responsible for the welfare and protection of whales from a small coterie of "experts" to the broader public as a whole.
$10,000.00
2015

Southern Vancouver Island Derelict Fishing Gear Removal Project

Derelict fishing gear has an unseen and devastating impact on the marine environment. Since 2002 the Northwest Straits Initiative's Derelict Fishing Gear Program, in Washington state, has removed over 4,000 ghost nets and 2,500 derelict crab pots from Puget Sound. In 2011 the Province of BC removed/disabled derelict crab pots and a seine net from North Pender Island, with a reported 1,799 dead and alive animals recovered. On the southern BC coast, there is currently no ongoing program to remove derelict fishing gear. Cetus Research and Conservation Society would like to become a leader for this work in southern BC waters, working with engaged participants - from fishermen to divers to beachgoers and citizen scientists. Living Oceans Society is developing a project to remove and safely dispose of derelict gear in northern Vancouver Island waters. Cetus will collaborate with Living Oceans Society to share the results of our research, our experiences and lessons learned, resulting in a cohesive approach to derelict fishing gear removal in the waters around Vancouver Island.
$15,000.00
2012

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