Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Constable Gerald Breese Centre for Traumatic Life Losses

British Columbia's Heads Together Project: Improving the Health & Well-being of People Living with Mental Health, Addictions, and Brain Injury

Up until now, it was estimated 180,000 British Columbians have a brain injury. This number is increasing significantly from overdoses and Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). There is a direct correlation between brain injury, mental health challenges, addictions, homelessness, criminality and incarceration, and domestic violence. These social issues are being looked at separately with brain injury being the most underserved, yet the root cause of the problem. Developing a plan for integrated brain injury, mental health, and addictions services which are accessible, equitable, client-centered, wellness focused, diversified and culturally safe will strengthen the health of BC communities.
$20,000.00
2019

Coqualeetza Cultural Education Centre

Opening the Basket:Sharing, Revitalizing and Reconnecting the Sto:lo Sitel Curriculum

A pressing issue in the Sto;lo territy relates to instruction of Indigenous topics and Indigenous worldviews in K-12 school curricula using authentic, respectful teaching/learning approaches and carried out in partnership with Indigenous communities/organizations. Teachers who are concerned about their teaching practice, Sto;lo members who have question about Indigenous inclusion, educators with successful pedagogical experience, and a community cultural centre will inform this multi-faceted issue through discussions and workshops that result in a long-term cooperative regional plan of major stakeholders in the Sto;lo territory.
$20,000.00
2019

Cortes Island Museum and Archives Society

Expansion of Archive & Artifact Collection Rooms

The proposed project will expand the size of the existing Museum, by constructing a West Wing with 2 new rooms adding 240 square feet. This project addresses the infrastructure challenges of working in an old building with very limited space, by creating a purpose-built space to house our growing Artifact & Archive Collections in proper climate controlled rooms, a public archives research room, a workroom for creating exhibits. At the moment, our ability to expand our successful Public Education & Archives Programs is constrained by space limitations to house and access the Archive & Artifact Collections. These collections provide materials for these growing programs; which in turn influence our revenues, as some of the programs raise funds for museum development. To ensure financial sustainability, the CIMAS board has made the building expansion a priority.
$10,000.00
2012

Cowichan Community Land Trust Society

Seeing Cowichan Forests Beyond Trees

We explore ways to work with communities and land owners to protect and restore forests in the Cowichan region. Since colonial contact these forest lands have been viewed as a source of timber and as an impediment to development. There is growing understanding that a shift in perspective is necessary. We need the biodiversity generated in our forests for pollination, flood prevention, water conservation, water and air purification, climate change resiliency, non-timber forest products, fish and wildlife, and social/cultural well-being. The project engages stakeholders in the Cowichan region, recruits volunteers, solicits donations, and develops action plans for future initiatives.
$18,297.00
2019

Cowichan Valley Intercultural and Immigrant Aid Society

Compassionate Leaders

The Compassionate Leaders Project is aimed at strengthening youth leadership development and civic engagement. This includes local youth and youth who are newcomers to Canada. The project will utilize much of the CIS Inclusive Leadership curriculum in its design, skill-building, action planning and shared leadership facilitation. The project involves: 1. Networking and collaboration work with School District 79. 2. Facilitating skill workshops to 60 – 100 students in each of the five secondary schools of School District 79. The workshop is a condensed version of CIS’s locally developed ‘Inclusive Leadership Adventure’ curriculum to guide students to replace instinctive fight-flight reactions; respect differences in language, accent, dress, and appearance; use inclusive leadership skills and stand up for diversity. It is facilitated by 5 to 10 trained facilitators. 3. Hosting a two-day session of Inclusive Leadership Adventure to 50 – 80 youths from Secondary Schools of School District 79. 4. Participation and leading Walk of all Nations 2014
$18,000.00
2012

Cowichan Women Against Violence Society

Gendered Health Care in Cowichan: Systems Change Required

Our project is addressing the issue that women’s health care needs are underserved. We propose a deep analysis of the systems with which vulnerable women interact, to reduce vulnerabilities which include: child apprehension, domestic violence, sexual abuse by landlords, among others. We can help point the way forward by asking the users of the services for their insights into which parts of the system appear to be “stuck” as well as identifying possible ways to become “unstuck”. Addressing the issue of gaps in services, or lack of coordination of services, should mean more effective service delivery and better access to effective health care.
$15,600.00
2020

CRES

Access to Media Arts - PILOT PROGRAM

This project's main aim is long-term sustainability of a program that offers low-barrier access to equipment, studios, training, education, and workshops. This sustainability is being sought through a "Fee for Service" program, which will use revenue obtained to be put back into the program. We have noticed a gap in services provided for artists, film-makers, media artists, radio producers, and documentary producers to have an affordable place to do audio work, or have audio work done for them by our technicians, with affordable but professional audio equipment. The program will offer a pay scale: one for professionals/regular clients; one for artist-members; and for artist-members who require low barrier access (by application). The cost of rentals and services will reduce for each category. The program will offer services such as: -rental of a professional audio studio -use and rental of professional equipment (following training) -hiring out MAC technicians/artists for work -technical services (dubbing audio, transferring files, audio editing/mixing/mastering) -more to be assessed during pilot phase As VIVO Media Arts Centre members and previous employees, we witnessed the success of their equipment, studio, and service booking system. With this program, we will offer a service we are not able to offer at all right now: access to studios and equipment; and further, with the revenue we receive, we can offer scholarships and lower rates to reduce barriers
$10,000.00
2017

Snewaylh-Aboriginal Teachings

Snewaylh is the Squamish word for "teachings". CRES, in conjunction with Vancouver Co-op Radio, is working on a project to help re-vitalize the teachings of the Aboriginal language by bringing Aboriginal youth and elders together and by using new technologies to pass on traditional teachings. We are using the aural medium of radio to support the vital need to preserve the oral teachings of Aboriginal languages and cultures. The Snewaylh radio program uses the airwaves to teach both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities about the languages and traditions of the original peoples. This project engages two Aboriginal youth to produce a radio show as an important way of developing pride and understanding of their culture while gaining concrete, transferable skills. The project comes full circle when the youth become mentors themselves, training a new generation of volunteers to produce the show and thereby ensuring the sustainability for the radio show while gaining another important component of experiential learning themselves.
$10,000.00
2011

Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention Centre of British Columbia

(re)Imagining Suicide Intervention

Choosing between leaving a caller in a suicidal crisis unsafe or exposing a vulnerable person to a non-consensual, police-driven visit to an emergency room is an artificial choice created by a system that gives people in suicidal crisis limited routes to safety, care, and wholeness. We will engage crisis line callers, crisis line staff, police, ambulance, mental health service providers, and communities with combative relationships with police and mental health systems to identify and address the legislation, policies, procedures and assumptions that keep the system stuck in a pattern of traumatizing and re-traumatizing individuals in crisis.
$20,000.00
2020

Advancing Lifesaving Enhancements to the Follow-up of Suicidal Individuals

Suicide is an important public health issue where an average of 10 people die by suicide each day in Canada. As identified in The Cost of Injury in Canada, a study funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada (June 2015), in 2010 there were 510 deaths by suicide in BC alone. In the same year, suicide and self-harm also resulted in 4539 emergency visits and 2855 hospitalizations, resulting in indirect and direct costs totalling $410M within the province. While the human cost of pain, grief and suffering are intangible, the economic costs of suicide are tangible and have resulted in significant economic challenges to the healthcare system. With a comprehensive case-managed 24/7 continuum of community support, the research shows that many of the 500+ deaths in BC can be prevented. Many suicidal people often do not seek support due to stigma around suicide. Crisis line contact, with its 24/7 accessibility and safety to reach out, can increase engagement and establish trust and further help seeking. With the already established rapport, our extended follow up process will help suicidal clients to better manage their own safety; however, phone and online service may not be sufficient to meet clients’ needs and face to face services are often required. Currently, fragmented service delivery processes exist for suicidal individuals. We are researching the impact of a structured follow up process over a period of time to determine the impact on connectedness and continuity of care.
$10,000.00
2016

Critter Care Wildlife Society

Building Enclosures for the Smaller Animals

Critter Care Wildlife Society rehabilitates all our native mammals from squirrels to black bear cubs our focus over the last five years was to get enclosures in tip top shape for the bigger animals. Our squirrel cages are badly in need of being rebuilt. They are very old and each year we are continually having to repair them. The enclosures for the squirrels need to be built on a much larger scale as it is hard for the flying squirrels to get proper exercise before being released. We need to be able to add natural foliage like branches, stumps etc. so they are prepared when released. For the other small animals we need to just rebuild new ones as the old are rotten. We would like to build 4 - 8ft' long (hutch type enclosures for some of the small animals) 3 - 8'X12' squirell enclosures. They would be erected on cement slabs.
$10,760.00
2011

CUMBERLAND COMMUNITY SCHOOLS SOCIETY

Cumberland Skatepark

The CCSS Skatepark Committee's goal is to work with the Village of Cumberland Council and Staff, as well as the citizens of Cumberland, to construct a 6000-7000 ft2 concrete skatepark by the end of the summer of 2015. The park will be designed for skateboarders, bmx-ers and scooters, and will be built by a professional skatepark company to ensure its long lasting value to the community. The park will consist of both street and transition elements and will be focused towards beginner to intermediate users who represent the majority of the population. The skatepark will be located in Village Park, a municipal park that serves as the recreational hub of our village. The skatepark will be adjacent to a children's playground and water park, tennis courts, a basketball court and a horseshoe pitch, providing opportunities for all ages in our community to interact. The funds requested in this grant will cover the majority of professional fees for the first design phase of the project. This includes design through community engagement and results in conceptual drawings.
$10,000.00
2014

Dance Victoria

Gabi Beier Choreographic Workshop

This project has two phases. Dance Victoria is seeking support for Phase One. It recently received confirmation of a $12,000 contribution from the Canada Council for this phase. DV will bring Berlin-based dance mentor Gabi Beier to DV Studios and the Dance Centre (Vancouver) to lead a choreographic workshop in each city. Beier will work with two Victoria and two Vancouver artists in an immersive two-week process. Participating artists will be selected from a proposal call for small group works and/or solos by artists that have at least one professional production of a previous work. Beier's methodology is detailed and comprehensive (but also responsive) and includes everything from planning the work to bringing it to the stage. The short works developed during Beier's tenure will be given presentations on a mixed bill in Victoria and Vancouver (April 2015). Beier will also interact with audiences and artists through lecture demonstrations in each city. Phase Two (not included in this request) will take one or more of these works to Berlin for further development in 2016.
$13,830.00
2014

Joe Laughlin Retrospective

DV is requesting support for Vancouver choreographer Joe Laughlin's retrospective project. The project includes a new commission, a remount of two older pieces and the reworking of a fourth. These four pieces will comprise a production that will be given two performances at the McPherson Playhouse, February 6 and 7, 2013 as part of Dance Victoria's 2012/13 Resident Artist Season. Next year marks 25 years since Laughlin began making dance. During that time he has created over 40 pieces. This project brings together three of his strongest and best-loved short works and a new commission that he will set on Ballet Victoria. Laughlin is DV's Artist-in-Residence in 2012/13. The production will include a work for four dancers from 1997 (Harold, Billy, Stan and Jack), a duet for a man and a tea cup (Left, 2003) and a 2011 work entitled dusk. In addition to the work with Ballet Victoria, Laughlin will re-work dusk in Victoria. When not in Victoria he will work with his company in Vancouver. All of the pieces will be combined and the transitions developed at DV's fully-equipped Studio 2.
$20,000.00
2012

Dancing on the Edge Festival Society

The Downtown Eastside Animation Project

The Downtown Eastside Animation Project will commission three Vancouver choreographers to create site-specific work for three different outdoor locations within the Downtown Eastside. Within those site works, one will include a community dance project which integrates members of the DTES community. These performance will be shown during the Dancing on the Edge Festival in July 2014. The overall goal of the project is to animate Vancouver's Downtown Eastside with accessible performances which engage and entertain local and non-local residents and promote the culturally diverse and dynamic neighbourhood. The project will work with three choreographers to create commissions for sites within the DTES. Drawing on the success of projects within the 2013 Festival, we will create specific works for the Chinatown Night Market, SFU Woodwards, and CRAB/Portside Park. The Festival, upon realization of funding constraints, is currently considering commissioning work from the following artists: Alvin Erasga Tolentino, Yvonne Chartrand, Josh Martin, Colleen Lanki, Michelle Olson.
$15,000.00
2013

David Suzuki Foundation

Charged Up: Accelerating Community-led Renewable Energy in BC

The conversation around climate change tends to leave individuals and communities feeling overwhelmed, powerless and full of anxiety. It often seems there is little we can do at the local level, and that what governments are doing is just not enough. Small-scale, community owned energy projects can empower communities to be part of positive, meaningful efforts to combat climate change through shared action. The Charged Up campaign will showcase community success stories, convene and train community leaders, and build a clean energy community who can support one another in addressing the technical, financial, and regulatory issues that come with clean energy projects.
$10,000.00
2017

Decoda Literacy Foundation

Decoda Literacy Conference

Decoda Literacy Conference
$10,000.00
2013

District of Sechelt

Visioning for Reconciliation in the shíshálh Homelands

This project seeks to address the need for reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples on the Sunshine Coast. It is important to heal the racism and attempted cultural genocide of the Residential School era that harmed Indigenous peoples, and cultivate new relationships based on interdependent autonomy, equality and respect. This work is meaningful because it is grounded in the deep dialogue required to build an inclusive grassroots movement. If our six steps are followed as planned they will result in a strategic vision, a report documenting what local people want to see, and a public engagement plan so the Movement can take wise action towards authentic reconciliation.
$20,000.00
2018

Documentary Media Society

Motion Picture Film Series

In 2008, DOXA expanded its programming to include The Motion Pictures Film Series, responding to a demand from our audience and partners for ongoing programming. The series offers audiences the opportunity to attend films and actively participate in post-film discussions with the filmmakers and panelists. The 2014 Series will deliver 8-10 screenings, each paired with ancillary programming that is directly aligned to the film’s content and/or style. The discussions are conceived of as a salon-style experience with the filmmaker(s), creative stakeholders, and invited panelists forging active connections between artists and audiences through dialogue and meaningful exchange. In 2014 the series will add new venues, across the Lower Mainland and throughout British Columbia, building province-wide networks and partnerships. DOXA is the only Vancouver-based festival to offer screenings outside of the city and is unique in that it presents films (both Canadian and International) that have not had a commercial release nor been shown in any other local festival event.
$15,000.00
2013

Douglas College

Changing the Conversation: Reflective Empathy and Public Discourse on Social Housing

Public discourse about divisive social issues – such as the development of modular supportive housing – can often be toxic, stigmatizing, and unproductive as a result of the influence of unreflective beliefs and emotions. To address this problem, this project explores how public engagement practices in municipal politics can be reformed to encourage a reflective and empathetic dialogue that seeks the good for all members of the community, especially those who are marginalized. The project examines how to foster this type of dialogue by engaging the whole of a person – their reason, emotion, and imagination – through the use of first-person narrative and the arts.
$17,900.00
2019

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House

Welcoming Spaces Project

The development of our Community Council in 2013 initiated a process of more active involvement in the programming and running of the NH. Residents clearly identified that one of the things that set the NH apart within the many services offered in the DTES, was the fact that the NH embraced and welcomed them in a variety of capacities: member, visitor, contributor, programmer. Because of this exciting feedback we are mindful that our success lies in the critical dimension of allowing those involved to shape and control their lives in meaningful ways. Our projects engage a “many hearths theory” or a multiple small groups approach to build community capacity. We also recognize that healing is a necessary part of development in our community. Our project involves piloting program development through 6 key projects: 1. Support group for Fathers 2. Healing and wellness days 3. Support group on Death and Loss 4. Social Nights--outreach– Music/arts groups 5. Re-connection with Nature: Field Trips, Walking Groups 6. Social justice Indian Residential Schools Survivors’ Support Group
$20,000.00
2014

Family Community Kitchens

Funding will allow for a Family Community Kitchen program where nutritionally vulnerable parents and children will come together for six week sessions. Community kitchen groups will meet twice weekly to prepare dishes in large enough quantities so that participants will be able to take away multiple servings of each dish to be warmed up at later times. The program will provide an opportunity for parents to be actively involved in their child's learning in a stable and fun environment. Staff and regular guest educators will support the experience-based learning of children based on the priorities of positive parenting and nutrition. The program will alleviate hunger, nuture positive child development and provide food and nutrition education. Nutrition is very important for everyone, but it is especially important for children because it is directly linked to all aspects of their growth and development - factors which will have direct ties to their level of health as adults. Child development, hunger alleviation and education about healthy eating are the main benefits of this program.
$20,000.00
2013

Family Drop-in: Families, Farming and Food

A safe drop-in space for families in the Downtown Eastside (M-F and Sunday from 4-7pm) This program has been developed to improve the determinants of health for families and children in our community through a program emphasis on food literacy, healthy meal preparation, culinary exploration and urban farming practices. A major component to the program is that it will be based on a peer led model. Families will be recruited as both participants, but also as volunteers who will lead the program with the support of a paid coordinator to help actualize their vision within the scope of the project.
$10,000.00
2012

Dr. Peter AIDS Foundation

Feasibility analysis of a social financing model to fund an opioid addictions service that aims to improve the well-being of individuals in Vancouver.

The Dr. Peter Centre intends to develop a pay-for-success project plan to engage public and private stakeholders in funding a pilot project that will introduce Injectable Opioid Agonist Treatment for participants at the centre, increasing access to this treatment model, expanding access to treatment options, and ultimately stabilizing the number of overdose related deaths in our community. Opioid use disorder is one of the most challenging forms of substance use disorder facing the health care system in British Columbia.
$10,000.00
2019

Earthwise Society

Feed the Bees Planting Program

The Feed the Bees Planting Program addresses root causes of pollinator decline by engaging widespread community action to plant "bee friendly" gardens at homes, schools, businesses and boulevards. The gardens will be mapped on-line to show how individual plantings collectively start to create habitat corridors, reducing habitat fragmentation and assisting in the movement of pollinator populations within urban areas. The Earthwise Garden is a learning resource for the project, demonstrating how ecological plantings of diverse flowering species enhance biodiversity. These concepts will be applied on a community wide scale to replace natural vegetation lost through development. Supporting the widespread adoption of specific planting programs that provide flowers over a long season helps to meet the habitat needs of pollinators. By engaging residents living in urban areas to help address a problem that impacts farming, the project creates greater awareness of how we are all interconnected and how individual actions can impact regional biodiversity and ecological health.
$20,000.00
2012

Pages