Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Alberni-Clayoquot Continuing Care Society

Co-operative Elder Care Initiative

One of the most critical social issues facing Canadians is the nation's rapidly aging demographic and the absence of affordable care for seniors. This project addresses the lack of high quality, affordable and responsive elder care to seniors and their families. Community-based co-operatives are proven to provide care that is more responsive and affordable because they are controlled by users and their families. By utilizing the tools and knowledge developed in this project, care givers and community groups will greatly increase their capacity to provide alternative forms of elder care by replicating community-based, user controlled models piloted in this project. The project also addresses the serious problem of isolation and loneliness faced by a growing number of seniors as well as the lack of support to their caregivers. The project will strengthen social capital in local communities and lessen the isolation of seniors by helping communities to develop co-operative models for the provision of care and the development of social networks for the support of the elderly.
$106,000.00
2012

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

West End Community Food Centre

The Community Food Centre we envision in Vancouver's West End takes a 3-pronged approach to addressing inequities in our food system, in a way that is rooted in the right to food. We will work with existing emergency food resources in our community to transition to providing people who access them with healthy, fresh food in a dignified environment. We aim to develop community capacity, skills and engagement for producing and preparing food through a comprehensive suite of skill-building and educational programs offered at various locations in our community, and we aim to hire, develop, train and support a group of peer advocates to operate in our community to challenge the systemic issues which create and entrench poverty. While each of these approaches has the potential to drive change on one scale or another, a community's level of food security is generally understood to embody each of the three prongs working in synergy. By providing individuals with multiple points of access to varying levels and scales of support and advocacy, we create the necessary conditions for a nimble response to the specific issues and concerns of our community. The West End Community Food Centre will be based on a model in which programs and initiatives are animated in various locations throughout our community (this may change down the road). Starting with programs in satellite sites throughout a community is also the model of growth for most of Vancouver's Neighbourhood Houses.
$110,000.00
2015

Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood Houses: A Sturdier Neighbourhood Fabric: Weaving Policy, People and Place Together

The project will connect diverse residents of Mount Pleasant more deeply to their local area, while enlarging their capacity to positively influence the way in which Mount Pleasant develops. The need was identified through participation in the local area planning process (2007-10); consultation (2011-12) with City staff and simultaneously with grassroots groups (focused on public realm, food security, community development and the arts), local business and service agencies; plus research from external bodies. The project (over 3 years) will develop and implement collaborative skills modules for policy-focused Working Groups; coordinate and support efforts of local area stakeholders through policy implementation regarding the built environment, public realm and social and economic development; facilitate effective partnership with municipal staff and academic teams in implementing the Mount Pleasant Community Plan; develop effective protocol for early engagement of local stakeholders by property developers; and create a toolkit to benefit multiple neighbourhoods and municipalities.
$100,000.00
2012

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

The Link

Aunt Leah's provides semi-independent housing for sixteen foster teens, 15-18 years of age, who are preparing to live on their own when they 'age out' of care at 19. We provide a basement suite with a supportive landlord as well as pre-employment and life skills training. Despite this intervention, many of these children are not fully prepared to make a full and successful transition to adulthood. Many go through a series of tenancy breakdowns and couch surfing ending with a large percent on income assistance or experiencing homeless. In 2010, Vancouver Foundation began 3 years of funding for a second-stage program called The Link which provides transition workers, food & housing, and education opportunities for 30 youth (annually). Today, the demand for this program has risen with over 80 former foster kids served per annum. The Link mimics the care that parented youth receive well into early adulthood; over half of 20-something Canadians choose to live at home. Over 40% of BC foster youth experience homeless after age 19; yet 90% of Link youth maintain safe affordable housing.
$100,000.00
2013

Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion

Kudos Prototyping Project

The Kudos Prototype Project will test and spread an informal learning & badging platform. Persons with a developmental disability will be matched to a pipeline of surprising learning experiences in the community, and receive credentials for their acquired know-how by means of a badging system (not unlike what is used in virtual games and social media). Experiences will be pulled together within multiple content streams around a passion (e.g hip-hop), a skill (e.g fixing things), a craft (e.g mechanics) or a discipline (e.g urban studies) - and provided by employers and community organizations via short taster sessions and mini projects. The platform will be co-created with persons with disabilities, their families, and local business owners. The idea for Kudos comes from 3-months of ethnographic work in a social housing complex in Burnaby. Whilst supported persons had access to day programmes and employment services, few activities widened and deepened interests, built bridging social networks, or leveraged those connections to shape meaningful, ongoing roles.
$110,000.00
2014

Coast Foundation Society (1974)

Let's Get Cooking

Coast Mental Health has approached Inner City Youth and Vancouver Community College to form a partnership which would develop and present an educational cooking program for street and at risk of homelessness youth with mental illness. Vancouver Community College will design a cooking program especially for this population and their learning needs. Beginning in January 2013, Let’s Get Cooking will develop the youths’ food preparation and technical cooking skills and enhance their confidence and social skills. It will be a low barrier program so that the youth with mental illness can participate when they are able. Inner City Youth and Coast Mental Health social workers and psychiatrists will work with the youth to encourage their participation, support them in their recovery and in developing acceptable work behaviors. The youth with mental illness will be supported by the Coast Coordinator and Peers (people with lived experience of mental illness) to succeed in the college course, to seek employment, and to move from the street or transitional housing to permanent housing.
$100,000.00
2012

Community Social Planning Council of Greater Victoria

Building Resilient Neighbourhoods

In 2012,we fostered neighbourhood resilience and action on social, economic and environmental sustainability in the CRD with Transition Victoria, supported by the Vancouver Foundation and Smart Planning for Communities. More than 200 residents from neighbourhood, business, and local government organizations participated in a series of training sessions to develop skills, resources and strategies to strengthen community resilience. Our recent webinar for local gvnts was oversubscribed within hours, demonstrating strong appetite for this project. Evaluation by participants was overwhelmingly positive and has resulted in the design of a 2nd phase of the initiative. The Resilient Neighbourhoods project works with neighbours and citizens to strengthen characteristics of resilience in ways that support neighbourhood connection today and strengthen capacity to respond to challenges in the future. It supports action by working with community groups, businesses, citizens, community organizations and institutions to develop community action on local resilience, community cohesion and wellbeing
$108,425.00
2013

District 69 Family Resource Association

Becoming and Belonging (Co-lead Researchers: Deborah Joyce, Family Resource Association; Dr. Jennifer Mullett, CHRC)

Community consultations were held with practitioners, policy makers, community members and a small group of youth with mental health challenges such as anxiety, depression, unhealed trauma and addiction. We helped the youth to produce short digital stories about some of their difficulties in the community. A significant theme was a lack of belonging. Youth also identified helpful resources.The stories indicated a need for research on how to improve the mental well-being of youth and engender a sense of belonging. This participatory action research project will use a strength-based approach to 1)Identify effective strategies to increase the well being of youth suffering from mental health; 2)Investigate community responsiveness and inclusiveness; and 3) Find ways to build on current collaborations to expand and strengthen them. Youth will be involved in all stages of the project and will be paid members of the research team. A document review will determine effective resources and strategies that attract youth participation, foster social connectedness and increase positive mental health. Digital stories will be created to document youths' perceptions of services and programs/projects, and to make recommendations. Collaborative strategies to enhance youth involvement in building and enhancing community assets will be developed through community mapping and focus groups. Two community forums will develop solutions, share knowledge, build collaborations and enhance connectedness. (Research Team: Sarah Fletcher, CHCR; Janice McMillan, School District 69; Carrie Barker, Island Health)
$103,810.00
2014

Ecotrust Canada

Local Economic Development Lab.

The Urban Economic Innovation Lab (the Lab) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community-designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Vancouver’s inner city, with relevance, we hope, for other urban contexts. A deep collaboration between Ecotrust Canada, RADIUS SFU, and a growing number of inner city partners, the Lab is designed to support community organizations, local governments, entrepreneurs and civil society in working together to activate the recently passed Downtown Eastside (DTES) Local Area Plan (LAP), catalyzing opportunities for inner city residents and organizations to increase their economic independence. The Lab will work closely with community stakeholders over three years to identify current challenges, and test potential solutions using rapid prototyping/assessment and business model development methodologies. The Lab will also provide 30 living wage, full-time internship opportunities for graduate students able to advance this work in strategic ways, which helps address a labour market and talent gap in Canada’s social economy through training and development opportunities, while adding rigour to our analysis of what works, and what can be shared.
$100,000.00
2015

Family Services of Greater Vancouver

Promoting Upstream Solutions for BC's Children and Youth

Working closely with our coalition partner organizations, First Call will undertake to strengthen and support the collective voice for the rights and well-being of BC's children and youth. The project will use 3 strategies, public education (including conducting research and disseminating/popularizing others' research), mobilizing communities and individuals through workshops, presentations, media work, toolkits, web resources, e-alerts, etc.) and direct public policy advocacy in collaboration with our partner organizations and communities (briefs, letters, reports, candidate surveys, convening/facilitating discussions among advocates and with decision-makers and policy 'influencers'). Some of the key issues these activities will address are the unacceptably high rates of child and family poverty in BC and our proposed solutions, the need for improved protections for children in BC's labour force, the need to reduce exposures to environmental toxins affecting children's health, and the crucial importance of increasing our investments in early childhood and supporting young families.
$100,000.00
2012

Federation of Community Social Services of British Columbia

There is a Better Way - A Social Policy Framework for BC

Why, in one of the wealthiest regions of the world, do we have 90,000 children living in poverty? How do we move from crisis managing sickness to promoting healthier lives? How do we want to treat our seniors, people living with disabilities or addictions, immigrants and First Nations? How do we all want to live together? In 2013/14, Board Voice undertook a provincial campaign advocating for the development of a Social Policy Framework (SPF) for BC, as a way of approaching some of the most challenging and intractable social issues requiring integrated and innovative responses. Through a process of engagement with businesses, municipalities, community partners and citizens, this proposed two year initiative is designed to spark interest in new ideas in the design and delivery of human services in BC, and create the climate for needed change. Key partnerships will provide the networks and help to create the momentum to explore these ideas locally. We expect the project to generate ideas and actions that will make our communities more livable and resilient. The project will have three phases: development of the online platform and content, meeting materials and templates; the coordination of community and online discussions; the collating of the information; drafting and dissemination of a report summarizing the outcomes. Expected key outcomes include engaged networks, increased awareness of social issues and suggested key elements of a SPF for BC.
$100,000.00
2015

Health Arts Society

Health Arts Society Growth to Sustainability Project

Health Arts Society (HAS) provides professional music performances that contribute to the quality of life of people in care. The Society presents 45-minute concerts of one to four performers, generally in series of ten a year, as "Concerts in Care." The hallmark of these concerts is the exceptionally high quality of performance. The value of the concerts is in the pleasure and enrichment they bring to audiences – people in care are as important an audience to serve with first-class music making as any other. Health Arts Society is engaged in an innovative programme to achieve sustainability by 2018, the GROWTH TO SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT. Its two pillars are the raising of a fund of $500,000 and a gradual increase in the revenues developed from the long-term care and retirement homes participating in the programme which will, by then, cover the majority of operating expenses. The result will be that although the Society will continue to grow, and to enlarge its programmes through philanthropic contributions, it will always have a stable foundation. This unusual strength is vital at a time when philanthropic organisations and individual donations cannot each be expected to indefinitely maintain organisations.
$100,000.00
2015

Hollyburn Family Services Society

Life Success Program

The Life Success Program (LSP) is a transitional housing program that supports homeless transitional aged youth, ages 18-24, to acquire the skills needed to live independently. Key areas of focus include life skills, employment, education, interpersonal relationships and community integration. The Life Success Program gives homeless youth a chance to get on their feet, build skills, and form a web of community resources around them while being encouraged and supported in creating a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Referrals come directly from the young persons themselves, other community resource providers, teachers, social workers, and families. The Life Success Program has access to a variety of groups from the Transition to Adulthood program in support of identified clients goals. The variety of programs provided include the Budget Chef cooking program, Girls Group, the Outdoor Education Program, the Hollyburn / Chill Snowboarding program, a community garden and Hollyburn Hockey Heroes.
$100,000.00
2013

Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society

A Place of Belonging

Metis Nation British Columbia (MNBC), Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society (KAFS) and Lii Michif Otipemisiwak Family and Community Services (LMO) have collaborated on this joint project with the focus on providing innovative safe supportive housing for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth in Kamloops 19 - 24 yrs of age and who are/have transitioned out of care of the child welfare system or who are currently homeless. We will first address issues of cultural identity, sense of belonging and self-esteem by providing supportive living arrangements for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth. This grounds our Aboriginal youth in culture and spiritual support, while simultaneously providing a safe place to stay. The Youth will then be better equipped with tools to grow into productive young members of society, provided with distinctly individual pathways available to them. This unique housing arrangement will be a starting place for youth to develop life skills while learning healthy skills with positive strong paths forward. Aboriginal Youth are disconnected from their Communities and require a strong sense of security in ones-self, to successfully transition into functional young Aboriginal adults. Aboriginal Youth need to start at square one, which involves finding out who they are, what their culture is and what it means to them and having pride in their sense of identity.
$100,000.00
2015

Lake Windermere Ambassadors Society

Citizen Science Series - Year 2 & 3

The era of climate imposed decisions regarding source water protection and water allocation for humans and the ecosystems upon which we depend, has arrived.  The Water Sustainability Act, a modernized Columbia River Treaty and localized watershed governance, will rely on accurate data, since water policy and data are inextricably intertwined. Community based monitoring includes open source, transparent, accessible, scientifically robust and indigenous relevant water data to inform decisions.  21st century challenges will require forging innovative, collaborative partnerships to collectively ensure economically and ecologically viable, climate resilient communities in Canada. 
$100,000.00
2017

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

Burnaby Youth Hub - Headspace Initiative

The Burnaby Youth Hub (“the Hub”) improves access to youth-centric services by offering a unique one-stop shop of services in a safe and empowering environment. In collaboration with a number of other partners, the Hub functions to provide young people with the opportunity and access to a comprehensive set of resources to foster a productive future as independent, engaged members of the community. In order to continue to provide innovative support that is responsive to the unique and varied needs of the young people in our community, the Hub will be launching a new framework of integrative care specifically addressing and de-stigmatizing mental health among youth. Modeled after the Australian Headspace initiative, this new approach will build off of existing foundations to better serve the needs of youth in Burnaby, as identified and articulated by the youth requiring and accessing these services. This innovative new framework will see greater focus on building holistic, compassionate, and inclusive services in a centralized design, structured around four core pillars: mental health, physical & sexual health, capacity-building (including education and employment skills), and advocacy. Under this new initiative, the voices and experiences of young people will be included throughout the process of program design and implementation, and the self-identified needs of youth in the community will drive the nature of the services provided at the Hub.
$100,000.00
2015

McCreary Centre Society

Youth Research Academy: Post majority research pilot

A shortage of longitudinal data exists about the challenges, supports and successes youth aging out of care experience. McCreary aims to use the expertise gathered by conducting surveys such as the BC AHS and Homeless and Street Involved Youth Survey (HSIYS), and longitudinal studies (e.g., 3-year evaluation following youth leaving PLEA) to support the YRA to develop and deliver a pilot study tracking youth as they age out of care. The YRA have been trained in survey development, data entry, analysis and dissemination. They have also been involved in focus groups and consultations with youth in and from government care. They will apply their developing research skills to this project. The project will follow established research ethics protocols for data collection and storage consistent with those used in other McCreary projects. Established protocols are also in place to ensure the secure handling of identifying information. Following youth and adult stakeholder consultations and with support from McCreary, TRRUST Collective Impact partners, and the YRA advisory committee, YRA members will develop a pilot study about the experiences of BC youth who age out of care. This post majority survey will canvass responses from youth approaching their 19th birthday and at two future time points (6 and 12 months). The YRA will be involved in all aspects of the project, from survey design to data analysis and dissemination.
$100,000.00
2017

New West Hospice Society

New West Hospice: Helping to Build a Compassionate City through Good Neighbour Partnerships

Healthcare today can’t meet all the practical, social and emotional needs for people and families at end-of-life. These unattended needs often lead to isolation, loneliness and social inequality. New West Hospice Society is adopting the Compassionate City Charter to address 13 social changes to normalize dying, death and loss. Our Good Neighbour Partnership will link a person/family living with palliative care needs at home and those in their circle of community who are able to offer social and practical support. The issues around dying, death and grief have been shrouded in a “mind your own business” attitude. We believe that care for one another at this time is everybody’s business.
$100,500.00
2017

Options Community Services

Neighbourhood Based Family Connections in Surrey/White Rock

Within the context of the dramatic demographic growth of Surrey (and the exponential growth in families with young children and the diversity of these families) and the limited neighbourhood infrastructure (geographic distance and transit issues that impose barriers) to support these families, the project will provide enhanced supports and resources to families through the creation of family resource networks or hubs.
$100,000.00
2011

Pacific Community Resources Society

Youth Supported Housing Program Extension

$106,640.00
2012

Potluck Cafe Society

DTES Kitchen Tables Project PHASE 3

Many vulnerable Downtown Eastside (DTES) residents don’t have access to quality food. The Kitchen Tables project is working with multiple stakeholders to create systemic change in the DTES food system. It aims to replace an unsustainable, charity-based system with a holistic community economic development system by building a sustainable food procurement, processing and distribution system that reflects the community’s identified values and priorities of food security for DTES residents.
$110,000.00
2011

Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre

MoreSports & YELL

Participants experience sport through introductory programs before, during and after school and as mini-sessions focused on physical activity and fun. MoreSports reduces traditional barriers to activity including the high cost of participation, transportation, lack of infrastructure or mistrust of the competitive sport system. The Youth Engage Leadership Learning (YELL) Program systematically develops youth leadership, creating qualified coaches and expanding programs to meet the demand for MoreSports.
$100,000.00
2010

Ready to Rent BC Association

Building Capacity through Education

Building Capacity through Education will build upon the recent Peers for Housing Stability initiative. Though Peers, R2R developed a youth-specific course and trained youth facilitators to co-facilitate 20 RentReady sessions in the Lower Mainland. Emerging feedback from community partners has indicated a demand for capacity building to deliver the training in-house, both the youth-specific RentReady course as well as the broader, certificate-backed RentSmart course. In speaking to youth, R2R has also identified the need to develop tools that address roommate living situations, often a requirement for affordability but legally in the grey zone and a source of many issues and conflicts. Finally, there is a need for increased awareness and expansion of the Ready to Rent model amoung landlords and housing providers in the Lower Mainland. The goals for Building Capacity are as follows: - to train community organizations in the Lower Mainland to become RentSmart and RentReady facilitators and be able to deliver the curriculum to their youth populations - to increase awareness of the RentSmart certificate amoung landlords and housing providers - to pilot and implement RentSmart within the public, alternative and aboriginal school systems - to develop tools, resources and supports to assist youth to identify and navigate successful roommate living situations
$100,000.00
2015

School District #43 - Coquitlam

Red Wolf Spirit Adventures

The Coquitlam School District Aboriginal Education (CSDAE) in partnership with Outward Bound Canada will facilitate together an outdoor education program that will balance adventure based learning with cultural teachings. Red Wolf Spirit Adventures will be facilitated in two separate programs; the Suwa'lkh Learning Centre (SLC) and the Aboriginal Youth Leadership Council (AYLC) The Suwa'lkh Learning Centre is hosted by SD#43 Aboriginal Education. The program is inclusive; however, Aboriginal students comprise approximately 98% of the 35 students attending this school. This program provides a more personalized learning environment for students. Youth at this school have typically had more personal challenges to overcome in their lives. The AYLC is comprised of Aboriginal students in grades 9 and 12 that are viewed as having positive leadership qualities. For the current school year we have 48 enrolled students in this programThe objective of this group is to continue developing their leadership skills through planning and hosting community events as a way of giving back.
$100,000.00
2013

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