Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Decoda Literacy Foundation

Micro-credentials for adult literacy learners

Decoda Literacy Solutions is adopting the Mozilla Open Badge concept to provide a literacy and essential skills credential system for adults who participate in community-based literacy programs. These programs are generally outside of formal education systems and do not have transcripts and certificates to identify learning. The use of a micro-credential system will assist in improving program completion rates for adult learners, as well as increased support as they move to further education and employment. Literacy practitioners across the province have agreed that this would be an important step forward. Together with volunteer literacy tutors and adult learners, they have provided input about how the credential system should look and work in general. Digital micro-credentials, such as open badges, are a new way to capture and communicate what an individual knows and can demonstrate. They can represent more granular specific skills or achievements than most credentials issued in formal education systems. A set of open digital badges for adult literacy program participants has been developed based on current commonly used competency benchmarks. This project will test the use of that set of badges as well as the development of further relevant badges by adult literacy learners. It will also provide a basis for introducing the badges to employers, employment agencies and other education providers to test the value of the credentials where adults will use them.
$150,000.00
2015

School District #39 - Vancouver

Cultivating the School Food System

Cultivating the School Food System is about empowering teachers and students in learning, growing and serving healthy food. When students have access to healthy, local, and delicious food, it is believed that that academic confidence will increase and discipline and behavioural issues decrease. , , Students learn better when they eat healthy food. We connect this work to the “Good Food” movement in Canada and the United States which focuses on food that is: healthy, green, fair, and affordable. , CSFS is a multifaceted, collaborative approach to enhance student learning, support teacher and staff innovation in teaching, and eating healthy, delicious, local food. It aims to shift attitudes and behaviours of students and support teachers and food providers to make systemic change in teaching practice and food provision. Programs support students across the VBE, focusing on vulnerable youth in E. and S. Vancouver, in Renfrew Collingwood, and Victoria-Fraserview, regions where youth food insecurity and poverty are prominent. CSFS addresses: Food Literacy: CSFS is transformative on-site learning for students. Creating opportunities for experiential and inquiry-based learning, it hosts training for educators; year-round field to fork programming for students, prepares youth with employment skills. Access: CSFS provides healthy, schoolyard farm grown food for the school community. It supports healthy school meal programs by facilitating an expert working group comprised of VBE staff, community partners, and FR to recommend and implement strategies for increasing food access. School Food System (SFS): CSFS inspires and supports schools to make large-scale shifts in purchasing, food service operations and student meal choices through a bundle of programs under the working title “BC Wednesdays.” This grant will support the teachers that want to do more. Already three schools have self-identified as wanting to participate in BC Wednesdays.
$150,000.00
2015

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through a Different Lens

The focus of this project is on the regular classroom: making learning more engaging and relevant for all students – rather than removing students to other programs. We are attempting to remove some of the barriers to success that many of our vulnerable students face (eg., over reliance on reading and writing); create strength-based classrooms where students can use their strengths to learn in alternative ways (technology, filming, creating, building, comics, interviews); and provide rich, relevant and meaningful learning opportunities. We began with in-class innovations in teaching and learning and are now supporting cross curricular and “outside” the classroom experiences – in the environment, on the reserve, and in intergenerational settings. Our application for a grow grant is to reach more classrooms and go deeper in those that have already been involved. Our school district has consistently achieved an 80-85% Six Year Completion Rate. The 10-15% of students that do not graduate consist of students of Aboriginal ancestry, students with a behavioural designation, students who have had difficulty with literacy through their school careers, and issues such as anxiety, drugs, alcohol. The two biggest groups are students of Aboriginal ancestry and those with behavioural designations. We have students as young as grade 9 leaving school. The school district has some alternative schools, career education, and other support systems, which support many students.
$150,000.00
2015