Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Animals in Science Policy Institute

Replacing animals in secondary education: a path to building an ethical culture of science

The practice of dissection causes harm to millions of animals and is a barrier to building an ethical culture of science that respects animal life. Our project aims to influence a systemic and cultural shift in secondary teaching so that non-animal alternatives to dissection are used more often, and become the norm. We support pre- and in-service teachers with lesson plans and materials and encourage student leadership with our outreach activities. Using alternatives in early science education will influence future scientists to more readily consider and use non-animal methods. This shift will reduce the numbers of animals used in science and subjected to the related welfare harms.
$150,000.00
2017

Arts in Action Society

Groundswell Grow

Currently, we are working with our alumni and community partners to plan and design Groundswell Grow. We will launch Groundswell Grow with a weekly marketplace on Granville Island in summer 2017. It will provide living inspiration for how to do business that benefits community, and give young ventures access to market, real estate, and an extended community support network. Advanced programs will include mentoring and market stand training, and support services for the early stage social venture community with the help of our community partners. As successful young entrepreneurs “graduate” out of the marketplace incubator stage they will populate the city with social businesses that work for communities and become mentors for new Groundswell Grow participants. The ecosystem will expand to include other local, young, social ventures who get access to the marketplace and a supportive network of training, mentoring and venture services. The marketplace setting will increase opportunities for public outreach and education around community based ventures and social entrepreneurship. This model will change the flow of resources through the business system: more small scale, unlikely entrepreneurs will have the knowledge and access to financial and social support to be able to create successful social ventures that provide them with meaningful employment. And, more businesses will exist that add social and environmental value to communities, not just monetary value.
$150,000.00
2017

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

West End Community Food Centre

Over a third of people in the West End of Vancouver live on a low and inadequate income and are food insecure. Historically society has responded to hunger (food insecurity) with charity, even though we know that quick fixes do not change the circumstances for people who are living in poverty. Gordon Neighbourhood House is working with partners to shift the conversation and action towards justice and away from charity. As a community, we have the power to spark long lasting changes, whether within our community or at a policy level, that ensure everyone’s right to good food by eliminating poverty. We do this work by bringing people together through food programs, dialogues, and training.
$150,000.00
2017

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Why Midwifery Care? Women exploring access to high quality maternity care (Dr. Saraswathi Vedam/Ms. Ganga Jolicoeur)

In 2012 the BC government allocated funds to expand admissions to UBC Midwifery and to build sustainable rural midwifery services. These policy changes were driven by maternity care provider shortages, and supported by the documented efficacy, patient satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of midwifery care. However, utilization of midwives is not equally distributed across the BC population. It appears that patient experience, public awareness, and regional availability are all factors that may affect demand and access to midwifery care. Research Team: Ruth E. Martin-Misener, Family Physician/UBC; Catriona Hippman, UBC/BC Women's Hospital; Kathrin Stoll, UBC; Laura Schummers, Research Consultant; Nora Timmerman, UBC; Kelly Murphy, UBC; Dana Thordarson, Psychology The objectives for this project emerged from two community consultations. Some midwifery patients reported enthusiasm for shared decision-making; others felt stigmatized when their choices were perceived to be in conflict with the community standard of care. As a result interest in midwifery care may be modulated by family and professional attitudes. Community midwives and rural women described populations that could benefit from but were currently underserved by midwives, and suspected that multiple barriers to access exist for vulnerable women. Hence, our multi-stakeholder team (patients, community service leaders and researchers) proposes that the overarching goal of our study is to identify factors that affect women's access to the full spectrum of maternity care options. Findings will inform a knowledge translation plan aimed at improving access to high quality maternity services, particularly among underserved and vulnerable women.
$159,676.00
2012

Canadian Mental Health Association - Prince George Branch

Expanding Employment - Year 2 and 3

The Expanding Employment project provides increased paid work experience and on the job site training to individuals who live with mental illness and substance use issues. Employees will have the opportunity to be trained by a professional chef in a catering business or work alongside an established crew on trail/yard maintenance, snow removal, gutter cleaning and small home repair jobs. These employment opportunities are in response to clients' requests to have "real jobs" and provide supportive work experience to assist in transitioning to community based employment. All prospective employees are matched with a support worker who will provide one on one vocational assistance and all will work on a team with a supportive trainer/leader who is in recovery. CMHA expects that some individuals will graduate to part or full time community based employment and all will benefit from increased independence and financial security which would lead to greater health outcomes.
$150,000.00
2012

CanAssist, University of Victoria

Expansion and Diversification of the TeenWork Employment Program

TeenWork is a unique social innovation. No other employment program in BC supports young people with disabilities while they are still in high school. The program was developed in 2009, when community partners identified the need for an employment service aimed at youth with disabilities. These youth were isolated and not acquiring important life skills associated with working. TeenWork helps level the playing field so youth with disabilities are able to reap the benefits of employment like their non-disabled peers. Job coaches provide individualized support to improve opportunities for employment among youth facing barriers and to continue this support during the transition to adulthood. TeenWork graduates eligible for government disability assistance tend not to access it because they have jobs that pay well and good benefits. Participants are optimistic about the future and their ability to be self-sufficient and contribute to their families and communities. Yet TeenWork only reaches 10% of youth in Greater Victoria who could benefit. Funding requested from the Vancouver Foundation would help expand the program in three critical ways: 1) improve program efficiencies and implement new fee-for-service opportunities to ensure ongoing sustainability; 2) diversify the participant population to include youth facing a wider range of barriers; and 3) work toward serving youth across BC by creating a training package that enables replication of the program in other regions.
$150,000.00
2015

Collingwood Neighbourhood House Society

Health and Safety Beyond the Margins: Scaling and Expanding the Living in Community Model

The project will apply LIC’s meta-framework to create coherent regional and provincial approaches to sex work to reduce the violence sex workers experience and create communities that are healthy and safe for everyone. We will build relationships with organizations who play key roles in supporting sex work health and safety across BC, including police, municipalities, nonprofits and health authorities. Using our successful Curriculum for Change training in addition to new multimedia tools, we will educate these stakeholders about the impacts of stigma and unpack the cultural constraints that keep barriers in place for sex workers. We will then build a provincial network of stakeholders that will identify best practices to increase sex work safety through policy level change and reduction of systemic bias against sex workers. This dialogue will lead to a 2017 provincial conference. This network will then take leadership in coordinating regional approaches and implementing best practices within their organizations and local communities. Scaling our work is critical because many of the systemic changes that are necessary do not rest at the organizational or local level but require consistent, collaborative and regional or provincial approaches. Scaling will also allow this work to ultimately be embedded in policy that is sustainable over time. Moreover, the marginalization of sex workers necessitates a cultural change where sex workers are seen as equal members of society.
$150,000.00
2016

Cowichan Social Planning Society

Cultural Connections: Re-Building Our Villages

We will begin by connecting with the communities that have expressed interest and develop 3 year plans with them that will begin the process of creating direction and beginning to build capacity within their own communities based on their needs, their challenges and their strengths. Our first step once we go into a community is to meet with members of the First Nations territories, ask permission, guidance and level of involvement that they would like to see and at what stages of the process they would like to be involved and/or lead From there: Community Based Workshop Series Creating a Cultural Shift: Healing our past, planning for our future Process: Large Group Workshops: Our Shared History Small Group Reflection: Rebuilding the Village; From a New Perspective What have we learned, what would we like to do, build framework for moving forward. Our Facilitation Team addressed over 200 LGLA members in Parksville. Introducing one of the exercises, Lucy Thomas told participants that, “What we are asking you to do today is going to take you out of your comfort zone. As we move forward through this process of healing and work to change the nature of our relationships, there will be many times we will feel both challenged and uncomfortable -we must remember not to let our discomfort stop us from continuing to move.”Scaling this to other regions provides opportunity for FN people to be the leaders of the reconciliation process, changing the systems from within.
$150,000.00
2016

Decoda Literacy Foundation

Micro-credentials for adult literacy learners

Decoda Literacy Solutions is adopting the Mozilla Open Badge concept to provide a literacy and essential skills credential system for adults who participate in community-based literacy programs. These programs are generally outside of formal education systems and do not have transcripts and certificates to identify learning. The use of a micro-credential system will assist in improving program completion rates for adult learners, as well as increased support as they move to further education and employment. Literacy practitioners across the province have agreed that this would be an important step forward. Together with volunteer literacy tutors and adult learners, they have provided input about how the credential system should look and work in general. Digital micro-credentials, such as open badges, are a new way to capture and communicate what an individual knows and can demonstrate. They can represent more granular specific skills or achievements than most credentials issued in formal education systems. A set of open digital badges for adult literacy program participants has been developed based on current commonly used competency benchmarks. This project will test the use of that set of badges as well as the development of further relevant badges by adult literacy learners. It will also provide a basis for introducing the badges to employers, employment agencies and other education providers to test the value of the credentials where adults will use them.
$150,000.00
2015

Family Services of Greater Vancouver

Youth and Community Navigator Program

Directions Youth Services, a division of Family Services of Greater Vancouver, provides critical supports to youth who are homeless, street involved and/or struggling with mental health and substance usage. Many of the youth that come to Directions have been involved in the foster care system. This grant will fund the expansion of our Navigator Program and would enable us to build the knowledge and skills of a youth’s community, while also supporting youth to achieve stability and successfully transition in adulthood. For the past 16 months, Navigator has provided support to 29 youth formally and 15 youth informally. Through this project, our understanding and practice in supporting youth through this critical age of development has been enhanced. Our learning has highlighted our need to further equip the community to support and accept these youth. Many of the youth we have worked with do have connections in their community who wish to take a more active role; however, these identified people often lack knowledge in the pivotal role they can play. They have indicated they would benefit from education to better support and prepare a youth to address needs such as: securing a health care team, housing, government ID and vocational/educational goals prior to their 19th birthday. This program aims to find a balance between educating the community and informing our training through continued support of youth transitioning into adulthood.
$150,000.00
2016

Full Circle: First Nations Performance

Moccasin Trek: Arts on the Move!

For 3 years, we will focus on communities we have not reached plus return to those where we were unable to deliver the services due to lack of resources and high demand. We will offer a wider variety of cultural artistic workshops and take more artists out on tour more frequently. We will increase our marketing and outreach plus invest considerable time consulting with the communities that we visit. The workshops will be educational as well as inspirational. The artists who teach them will serve as role models. For remote communities requiring more extensive travel, we will restructure to program to suit the needs of the community. We believe growing this project will have a clear and lasting outcome for those who participate because it is intended to foster understanding of cultural differences alongside pride in their own heritage plus encourage dialogue with their friends and their families. This will have a direct effect on social issues such as cultural understanding, marginalization and prejudice. MT! will open the door to many, who for a variety of reasons, have never had the opportunity to participate in live performance and witness the incredible power it can have. By sharing our cultural art practices, protocols and traditions with as wide a populace as possible, both the artists and the participants from the community will be inspired, develop insight and deeper understanding. Knowledge is the key to understanding, tolerance and acceptance.
$150,000.00
2017

Kickstart Disability Arts and Culture

Access to the Arts for All

While many of Vancouver’s cultural institutions have provided physical accessibility to their facilities, often that is where the accommodations ends, and little thought is given to bear on providing a full range of accessibility to the artistic expressions within, to a wider range of people who live with other disability barriers. Kickstart would like to expand and re-orient its annual public presentation events series, with the intention to work with a series of arts and or cultural institutions over the course of three years to help open the doors of these institutions to having their programming reach a larger part of society.
$150,000.00
2018

Matsqui-Abbotsford Impact Society

Making Resiliency Happen through Youth-Adult-Partnership for Aboriginal Youth in Care

First Nations Health Authority, Fraser Health-Aboriginal, Sumas First Nation, and Valley Youth Partnership for Engagement & Respect (VYPER – managed by Impact) propose a project, based on collective impact (Turner, et al, 2012), developmental evaluation (Patton, 2011), and outcome mapping (Earl, Carden, & Smutylo, 2001), that will enhance community youth-adult partnership behaviours to improve the number, quality and sustainability of Aboriginal teaching-inspired resiliency-building opportunities available to youth-in-care in the Fraser Health region. This approach acknowledges replicated studies showing resilience is a social process (Obradovic, Burt, & Masten, 2006; Sameroff & Rosenblum, 2006; Stajduhar, Funk, Shaw, Bottorff, & Johnson, 2009; Stone, Becker, Huber, & Catalano, 2012), and is based on three core factors that support youth into thriving by mid-life (Brown, Jean-Marie & Beck, 2010): 1. opportunities to participate and contribute; 2. caring and connected relationships; and 3. developing high self-expectations. These factors align with Indigenous teachings around the four quadrants of the medicine wheel: generosity, belonging, mastery, and independence (Brendtro, Brokenleg, & Van Bockern, 2002). The project will support the addition of an Aboriginal Youth-In-Care Facilitator to the VYPER project, which already engages numerous Aboriginal youth-in-care. The specific role will be to facilitate opportunities that support traditional ways between elders and youth.
$150,000.00
2015

Potluck Cafe Society

Knack

Our aim is to create a diversity of income-generating opportunities that fit the diverse needs of residents of the DTES. We want to build an innovative framework that recognizes employment-related skills and qualities that residents of the DTES have gained through unconventional paths that don’t usually get highlighted on a typical resume. We hope to assist individuals who want to move along the employment continuum and meet them where they’re at. For the next phase, we want to test our badging framework with external agencies and build capacity within the system to facilitate greater mobility for individuals who are advancing along the income generation continuum. Through our initial testing, we saw that recognizing individuals with badges for their earned achievements often empowers them with greater self-efficacy and inspires them to aim higher. We’ve also seen that smaller, task-based work opportunities get them more acquainted with employer-employee relationships and increases their confidence in their own ability to re-enter the workforce. At the core of this social innovation is a desire to realign resource flow around knowledge (training) and money (income). We see a ripple effect for basic routines, policies and beliefs that are preventing the widespread adoption of Social Hiring. Our goal is to recognize and champion the strengths and abilities of our program participants, and support the creation of a more inclusive, accessible and resilient local economy.
$150,000.00
2017

Powell Street Festival Society

Advocacy and Outreach Through Arts-based Community Development at WePress (Years 2 and 3)

The Powell Street Festival Society is partnering with WePress on an exciting new project that harnesses the power of arts and culture to bring money, skills, and opportunities to low-income and marginalized people, while engaging professional, emerging, and self-taught artists to create new works and build community. WePress is an inclusive, accessible artspace that provides workshops, events, studio time, and access to its letterpress and equipment while hiring low-income DTES artists, thus re- directing the flow of resources to those who need them most, and helping to improve participants' mental health and quality of life.
$150,000.00
2018

PuSh International Performing Arts

Concord Floral Youth Canada 150 – Community-Engaged Youth Workshops, Production and Arts Congress

Our project is entitled Concord Floral Youth Canada 150 – Production, Community-Engaged Youth Workshops, and Arts Congress” – an ambitious, Metro Vancouver-wide, 16-month (June 2016-Sept 2017) multi-layered youth initiative inspired by Canada’s Sesquicentennial, that brings together future arts and community leaders for creative expression, dialogue and skills development. The project will take place across Burnaby, Vancouver and Surrey. It will involve: 3) a three-month series of professional artist-led youth workshops on performance, industry best practices, community leadership skills and opportunities, career development in the arts, and innovative approaches to social media (Sept-Nov 2016); 2) a locally cast production (with Touchstone Theatre) of “Concord Floral” by Jordan Tannahill, 2014 Governor General Award winning Canadian playwright, (http://www.suburbanbeast.ca/concord-floral) (Dec 2016-Feb 2017) to premiere at the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts, then tour to the PuSh Festival and the Surrey Arts Centre; and 3) a (free) youth-driven Arts Congress, to be held at Surrey’s new City Hall (July 2017). Concord Floral Youth Canada 150 partners came together out of a desire for exploring and developing a collaborative model to share resources, perspectives and best practices. The project will impact the lives of over 450 youth (ages 15-25) and is envisioned as highly participatory, inclusive, and accessible.
$150,000.00
2016

Richmond Society for Community Living

Grade 13 Transition Project

The Grade 13 Transition Project will build its foundation from the current work of the Grade 13 Transitions Committee. RSCL, in partnership with the district’s EXPLORE program, is actively working with 3 students from different schools in the district, one of whom regularly attends RSCL youth programs. The goal is to offer specific supports which will fall in line with proposed new curriculum, assess outcomes and use the information to begin to develop a broader curriculum. With funding from Vancouver Foundation, the Grade 13 Transition Project will develop over a three year period. The project will combine best practices from the RSCL Youth Employment and Outreach programs and the newly launched district EXPLORE program, with support from committee partners. The project will begin with curriculum development in one or two schools with whom RSCL has existing relationships. In the second year of the project, the curriculum will be assessed, refined and will be introduced in additional schools. The final year of the project will include further refinements of the information, expansion of program delivery to include all schools in Richmond, and the opportunity to share information with community living agencies and school districts across the province. By standardizing the curriculum across the district, teachers and district staff will have the same knowledge, resulting in improved learning outcomes for students in Richmond.
$150,000.00
2016

School District #39 - Vancouver

Cultivating the School Food System

Cultivating the School Food System is about empowering teachers and students in learning, growing and serving healthy food. When students have access to healthy, local, and delicious food, it is believed that that academic confidence will increase and discipline and behavioural issues decrease. , , Students learn better when they eat healthy food. We connect this work to the “Good Food” movement in Canada and the United States which focuses on food that is: healthy, green, fair, and affordable. , CSFS is a multifaceted, collaborative approach to enhance student learning, support teacher and staff innovation in teaching, and eating healthy, delicious, local food. It aims to shift attitudes and behaviours of students and support teachers and food providers to make systemic change in teaching practice and food provision. Programs support students across the VBE, focusing on vulnerable youth in E. and S. Vancouver, in Renfrew Collingwood, and Victoria-Fraserview, regions where youth food insecurity and poverty are prominent. CSFS addresses: Food Literacy: CSFS is transformative on-site learning for students. Creating opportunities for experiential and inquiry-based learning, it hosts training for educators; year-round field to fork programming for students, prepares youth with employment skills. Access: CSFS provides healthy, schoolyard farm grown food for the school community. It supports healthy school meal programs by facilitating an expert working group comprised of VBE staff, community partners, and FR to recommend and implement strategies for increasing food access. School Food System (SFS): CSFS inspires and supports schools to make large-scale shifts in purchasing, food service operations and student meal choices through a bundle of programs under the working title “BC Wednesdays.” This grant will support the teachers that want to do more. Already three schools have self-identified as wanting to participate in BC Wednesdays.
$150,000.00
2015

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through a Different Lens

The focus of this project is on the regular classroom: making learning more engaging and relevant for all students – rather than removing students to other programs. We are attempting to remove some of the barriers to success that many of our vulnerable students face (eg., over reliance on reading and writing); create strength-based classrooms where students can use their strengths to learn in alternative ways (technology, filming, creating, building, comics, interviews); and provide rich, relevant and meaningful learning opportunities. We began with in-class innovations in teaching and learning and are now supporting cross curricular and “outside” the classroom experiences – in the environment, on the reserve, and in intergenerational settings. Our application for a grow grant is to reach more classrooms and go deeper in those that have already been involved. Our school district has consistently achieved an 80-85% Six Year Completion Rate. The 10-15% of students that do not graduate consist of students of Aboriginal ancestry, students with a behavioural designation, students who have had difficulty with literacy through their school careers, and issues such as anxiety, drugs, alcohol. The two biggest groups are students of Aboriginal ancestry and those with behavioural designations. We have students as young as grade 9 leaving school. The school district has some alternative schools, career education, and other support systems, which support many students.
$150,000.00
2015

Simon Fraser University - Faculty of Health Sciences

Exploring the health and social impacts of evictions among people who use drugs Co-lead researchers: Dr. Ryan McNeil, Postdoctoral Fellow, SFU; and Mr. Hugh Lampkin, President of Board of Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users

Over the past five years, people who use drugs (PWUD) living in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (DTES) have increasingly experienced eviction due to urban redevelopment. A lack of understanding about the nature of evictions and how evictions shape health and social outcomes, such as drug-related risks (e.g., syringe-sharing), health access (e.g., HIV care) and drug scene engagement (e.g., drug dealing), remains a significant barrier to developing evidence-based housing policies and targeted public health interventions to address this issue. Building upon ongoing collaborations and community consultations, the Urban Health Research Initiative (UHRI) of the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CFE), Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU), and Pivot Legal Society have come together to propose this community-based participatory research (CBPR) study to examine evictions and how they influence health and social outcomes among PWUD in the DTES. This study will employ participatory methods, including peer-led qualitative interviews and innovative qualitative geographic information systems (GIS) data collection, to generate unique insights into the impacts of evictions, and will supplement these methods with legal analyses undertaken by Pivot Legal. In doing so, this study will generate public health and socio-legal evidence to inform the policy and programmatic response to evictions, while also equipping PWUD with legal advocacy tools to protect their rights. Research team: Ms. DJ Larkin, Pivot Legal Society; Dr. Will Small, SFU; Dr. Thomas Kerr, BC Center for Excellence in HIV/AIDS; Dr. Lindsay Richardson, UBC
$157,279.00
2014

The Arthritis Society, BC & Yukon

Development and pilot testing of a culturally relevant and family-based self-management program for First Nations people with arthritis (Dr. Allen Lehman)

The project we propose will: 1) Develop a culturally-sensitive and family-based program for First Nations (FN) people and family members across BC to improve self-management of arthritis. 2) Evaluate the program in FN communities to find out if it improves social support from family, coping skills, and self-efficacy at managing arthritis symptoms after six months; and, 3) Improve the capacity for care and research by FN people for FN people.
$160,000.00
2010

UBC - Department of Medicine Department of Medicine

Exploring Access to Health Information in Surrey's South Asian Community (Co-Lead Researchers: Dr. Kendall Ho and Mr. Paul Bains)

The proposed project addresses the question: What support do members of Surreys South Asian (SA) community need in order to use eHealth tools to manage and prevent chronic diseases? In BC, the SA community has higher than average rates of chronic diseases[1]. CINS and the eHSO have worked with the SA community to reduce health disparities by supporting chronic disease management (CDM) and prevention. The interCultural Online Health Project (iCON), an eHSO community outreach program led by Drs. Ho and Cheema, has conducted research on patient engagement, information needs, and CDM in BCs SA communities since 2008. Information from community participants suggests that eHealth literacy is an area in need of development[2]. Health literacy can be defined as the set of skills required to use eHealth to its full potential. Technical proficiency, language ability, and media literacy are among the components of eHealth literacy[3]. iCONs research also indicates that the SA community views eHealth as a valuable opportunity to optimize CDM through online resources, apps, and other technologies. eHealth also has potential to promote uptake of clinical prevention services, such as screening programs. Partnering with an extensive community network, we will develop capacity and infrastructure within Surrey's SA community to generate a deeper understanding of factors affecting the use of eHealth. Findings will inform future initiatives to support eHealth-enabled CDM and prevention. Research Team: Drs. Victoria Lee, Helen Lauscher, Ms. Sunita Kapoor, Dr. Arun Garg, and Mr. Jay Bains
$157,486.50
2014

UBC - Department of Psychiatry

The Bipolar Youth Action Project (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Erin Michalak, Associate Professor, UBC, and Ms. Andrea Paquette, Executive Director, Bipolar Disorder Society of British Columbia)

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a serious mental illness characterized by extremes of mood. As onset typically occurs in young adulthood, youth with BD are a target group for early intervention and support. There is good evidence that 'self-management' strategies can positively impact health and quality of life in adults with BD. What is missing from a research perspective, however, is knowledge about effective wellness strategies for youth with BD (i.e., the focus of this application). Evidence collected 'on the ground' also indicates that this area is a community priority; this project was catalysed by the dissatisfaction voiced by youth with BD in BC themselves. In our 'Bipolar Youth Action Project', two organisations - a research group specialising in community-engaged BD research and a BD-specific community group on Vancouver Island - will unite to fill this knowledge gap. Youth with BD will be integral to every stage of the research. For example, two youth are members of the research team, and we have already performed a youth consultation on the project methods, established a nascent 'youth action group' and identified key community collaborators. These steps demonstrate both our commitment to authentic and sustainable community engagement and the passion of the youth themselves for this endeavour. Knowledge gained will inform the development of appropriate resources to support youth self-management, leading to enhanced capacity for self-care in this vulnerable community. Reaearch Team members: Dr. Joanna Cheek, Co-Investigator, Mr. Joseph Haverty, Youth Leader, Ms. Jessica Megan Williamson, Youth Leader, and Dr. Wei-Yi Song, Co-Investigator
$159,520.00
2013

University of British Columbia

We Want to be Healthy: A Community Engagement Strategy to Enhance Foreign-Born, Older Adult Health and Mobility (Dr. Joanie Sims-Gould)

SVNH has been serving the needs of older adults since 1977 and has developed a strong foundation of services, supports and community engagement activities. In an ongoing effort to serve older adults, SVNH is currently leading the Seniors Hub project. The goal of the Seniors Hub project (Hub) is to create a sustainable network of programs and services to support older adults at the neighbourhood level. Through consultations with SVNH staff, the South Vancouver Seniors' Advisory Council (SAC), local seniors centres/organizations in the SVNH catchment and older adults, priorities for the Hub include understanding the needs and reaching out to under-served foreign-born populations in South East Vancouver (e.g. Vietnamese, Filipino, and Tamil seniors). In response to these identified priorities, we are particularly interested in better understanding the health and mobility needs of the under-served foreign-born older adults living in the SVNH catchment. We know that there are important and significant associations between the design of neighbourhoods, where older adults live and their ability to move within their neighbourhood. The goal of this project will be to better understand the specific health and mobility needs of foreign-born older adults in the SVNH catchment.
$153,087.00
2012

University of Victoria - Faculty of Law

Mining Law Reform in British Columbia

While mining has been a key industry in BC, outdated regulations that are now below Canadian standards means that mining poses grave environmental and public health risks. Mine-affected communities and First Nations bear a disproportionate burden of this risk. This project aims to fix the root of mining challenges in BC by reforming old mining laws. In addition to raising public awareness about mining’s impact and the urgent need for law reform, it will deliver workshops to enhance public participation and highlight the need to take Indigenous rights into account. New mining regulation in BC will protect people and the environment, and decrease public liability for mining operations.
$150,000.00
2017

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