Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

3H Craftworks Society

Threadworks: Tailored for Inclusion

Threadworks will be a flexible and tailored skills training program for people with disabilities who are not currently engaged in the workforce, not well served by current programs, and impacted by the lack of employment opportunities. The need for Threadworks arose from the number of people seeking sewing skills and the number of contracts received from Craftworks and Common Thread. Threadworks will be an accredited training program that will promote labour market participation in the cut-and-sew and apparel industries. The project will tailor curricula to address the complex needs of participants and to facilitate employment opportunities through social enterprise and for-profit industry collaboration. Flexible practicum-style opportunities will be incorporated to transition participants into paid employment. There are currently no accredited programs of this nature in Canada. The social goal of Threadworks is to dismantle the stigma that people with disabilities are unproductive and unreliable in the workforce. Mental illness is an evolving process and Threadworks will be open to fluctuations in participants’ health that affects their ability to proceed with training and employment. The project will lead to a cultural reinterpretation of what it means to have a disability in the labour market/workforce. Threadworks will adopt a holistic support model that includes industry partners, healthcare providers, community/social enterprises, and employment services.
$225,000.00
2015

Art Starts in Schools Society

Art is essential - not extra

There is tremendous opportunity for artists and teachers to collaborate as partners in education and explore arts integration in classrooms. Our project seeks to increase the employability of artists in schools. Infusion offers training for artists to develop a complementary teaching practice, woven into their robust artistry. Teaching artists have greater opportunities to work in schools as they can speak the language of education. Infusion provides educators with professional development to expand their understanding of art in education. Our project seeks to change: - Basic routines: Artists interested in working in schools need support as navigating school culture can be intimidating and even prohibitive. Teachers teach the way they teach and need a compelling reason to explore new approaches like arts integration. - Resources: The role of artists in schools needs to be expanded in order to re-establish the flow of resources. - Beliefs: Young people are taught that art is separate from the rigor of ‘academic’ subjects. Since 2012, we have supported 97 artists to become teaching artists. This grant will help us launch the next phase, which is to deploy resources to the following: mentorship, marketing systems, advocacy and evaluation. This next phase will help us examine whether the role of art is actually expanding in the education system, and inevitably our community, and if the perception of how young people are taught to perceive art is actually changing.
$225,000.00
2017

British Columbia's Women's Hospital and Health Centre Foundation

Changing Perceptions: Reimagining Sexual Assault to Better Support Survivors

In BC (2014) there were ~70,000 self-reported incidents of sexual assault (SA). In contrast only 2,341 SA were reported to police in the same year. Victim-blaming contributes to a culture where SA survivors’ credibility is undermined, evidenced by a reluctance to disclose or report to authorities. Low conviction rates and well-publicized SA case rulings reinforce public perceptions that minimize the severity of SA. Systemic re-victimization compounds survivors’ trauma and creates barriers that reduce willingness to disclose and access support services. Never has public awareness about SA in Canada been so high, creating an opportunity for changes in both public attitude and policy. The social innovation this research project will explore is how to stimulate a shift in the public discourse around SA toward less victim-blaming and more trauma-informed responses across multiple systems (health, justice and education). BCW and EVA BC will work with survivors, community-based organizations, and SA response systems, to investigate how power holders influence public perceptions of SA and how public perceptions of SA influence survivors’ willingness to disclose and access support. Knowledge generated from this project will facilitate safer environments for survivors to disclose and access support services and improve trauma-informed responses to SA across multiple sectors in BC.
$224,553.00
2016

CCEDNet

Social Finance for Community Health and Well Being in British Columbia

Firstly we will compile a summary of existing research on impacts and models of place-based social finance in Canada and BC, and use that evidence to invite participation in and inform a "Learning Community" of practitioner and policy stakeholders in BC that will be convened over the lifetime of the project. Secondly we will support the implementation of two investment vehicles by the Vancouver Island Community Investment Cooperative that are currently in development. One is a Community Loan Fund in partnership with an Island based Credit Union that will invite contributions to a dedicated GIC the deposits in which will serve as collateral for loans to affordable rental housing, renewable energy, sustainable agriculture and fisheries, First Nations economic development, and other local owned ethical enterprises that create social benefits and community impacts. The other vehicle is a securities regulated investment fund that is RRSP eligible that will be implemented in partnership with a Securities Registered Investment Management Company to support the same types of community benefits. Thirdly we will evaluate both the social and economic impact of the funds and use that information to inform stakeholders and the Learning Community and assist with dialogue with the BC Government, the media, the finance sector, the Securities Commission, and municipalities on enabling public policy needed to help a place-based retail social financing to grow to scale in BC.
$225,000.00
2016

Christ Church Cathedral

The Maundy Cafe

This project aims to initiate a cultural shift in faith-based food programs from one that favors arms-length charity to a justice-based approach that combines a focus on food and social inclusion. This project will share learnings gained in the Cathedral’s transformation from emergency food provider to facilitator of food security committed to honoring the agency, creativity, dignity, intellect, and worth of all participants. Since faith communities play a significant role in the city’s food system, this project will have direct effects in progressing towards a more just, inclusive, and participatory food system.
$225,000.00
2017

City of Surrey

All Our Relations: Indigenous Children and Families Thriving in Surrey

45% of Indigenous children in Surrey live in poverty. We are compelled to act. Multiple systems interact in complex ways to create Indigenous child poverty. Band-aid solutions will never get at the deep systemic change required. We are proposing a Social Innovation Lab process, bringing all parts of the system together to gain insight into the roots of Indigenous child poverty in Surrey and identify a range of opportunities with the potential for high impact and uptake. We will test solutions, designing, implementing and evaluating together. We envision a ripple effect of change throughout the system, ultimately creating a city where all Indigenous children and families thrive.
$225,000.00
2017

Disability Alliance BC

The Right Fit Pilot Project: Facilitating Occupancy of Wheelchair Accessible Housing

DABC and our RFPP steering committee partners are seeking to change the system of wheelchair accessible housing provision in Metro Vancouver. Our desired outcome is the removal of the systemic barriers we have highlighted, so that wheelchair users can obtain the housing and supports they need through an accessible, timely and efficient process. The 3-year RFPP is designed to be a systemic intervention to test the development of fast track policies and procedures in MSDSI, the region's Health Authorities, linking and growing an enhanced registry of available accessible housing, and utilizing financial incentives for housing providers to maintain vacancies until wheelchair users can occupy their available accessible units. The RFPP will accommodate a constant caseload flow of 20 wheelchair users with the expectation that 60 or more will be served over the 3-year period. The RFPP aims to test the following system changes in Metro Vancouver: • Health authorities pre-screen and pre-approve home support and occupational therapy needs assessments; • MSDSI streamlines existing equipment allocation processes for eligible RFPP participants; • Housing providers funnel all accessible housing vacancies through the RFPP; • BC Housing makes funding available to housing providers to hold appropriate units until a RFPP participant can occupy a unit; • RFPP participants receive specialized case management and peer support to enable them to access units as quickly as possible.
$223,538.00
2016

Ecotrust Canada

North Coast Innovation Lab

The North Coast Innovation Lab (NCIL) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Prince Rupert. This project will complement the City’s vision for Prince Rupert and test how an intentionally designed innovation lab will bring capacity, resources, creativity, and solutions to bear on the serious problems facing the community. Because this is about systems change at a community level, there is potential for social innovation across a number of fronts. I.e. new partnerships between entrepreneurs, the business community, and academic institutions can change resource flows in terms of capital, human resources, and authority; and collaboration between indigenous and municipal governments can change policy and create active partnerships. The NCIL will build on learnings from the Local Economic Development (LED) Lab, an Ecotrust Canada collaboration with RADIUS SFU, place- based in Vancouver’s inner city, which was supported by the Vancouver Foundation in 2015. The theory, process and design of the NCIL is modeled on LEDLab but will scale beyond a neighbourhood level and test applicability in a municipal and northern context. As a holding place for creative collaborations, co-generating solutions, and adapting and prototyping new approaches, the Lab will play a key role in activating and actioning ideas coming forward through community engagement and visioning.
$225,000.00
2017

Faculty of Medicine Digital Emergency Medicine

Evidence Supported Self-management Enablement and Cultural Engagement (ESSENCE)

In BC, doctors use evidence-based clinical guidelines when treating patients with chronic disease. BC is undergoing major health system changes, increasing patient involvement in health care decisions and self-management. For this reason, there is a unique opportunity for multicultural communities to identify recommendations for developing culturally-appropriate evidence-based guidelines, and creating accompanying patient guides. ESSENCE aims to understand barriers and facilitators for multicultural communities to meaningfully participate in health policy discussions, while identifying a pathway for cultural adaptation of clinical practice guidelines for doctors and patients.
$225,000.00
2017

Federation of Community Social Services of British Columbia

Community Based Social Services Innovation

Many BC communities face a patchwork of government services that are neither integrated nor holistic. These often fall short of what citizens need and lack community-specific requirements. Provincial governments struggle to bridge silos of regulation, funding, and administration. Our project offers an alternative to such centrally-designed and -managed services based on four successful community pilot programs that took place over the past 2 years. By empowering existing networks of community-based organizations, local governments, and First Nations, we are establishing new ways of organizing, coordinating, and delivering social services to even the smallest and most remote BC communities.
$225,000.00
2017

Fraser Basin Council Society

Rural Housing First

The project is to pilot a rural HF program, and to test the model on a small scale with a targeted group prior to scaling up the approach to meet the broader community needs. Ultimately, the entire process of housing and support will be redesigned as per the principles of HF: 1. Immediate access to permanent housing with no housing readiness requirements 2. Choice and self-determination 3. Recovery orientation 4. Individualized supports 5. Social and community integration We will redesign housing access processes and protocols to maximize the use of existing resources for a test group of clients. Current access for marginalized and vulnerable clients is based on individuals seeking housing services directly from each service. The proposed approach will coordinate access, and utilize existing outreach staff to identify clients who are need of housing and supports. We will work directly in partnership with landlords to ensure appropriate placement and ongoing support of the landlord-tenant relationship. The Housing and Homelessness Committee will serve as program advisors, redesign intake and case management protocols, and assist with client eligibility assessments. We will aim to complete integrated intake and assessment and housing for a maximum of 20 clients annually and provide ongoing supports as needed. The pilot will be evaluated from the perspective of clients, workers, community partners, landlords, and other relevant stakeholders.
$221,750.00
2016

Heiltsuk Tribal Council

Sacred Journeys -The resurgence of Indigenous Canoes -Travelling Exhibit

Social innovation and change intertwine in the main goals of Sacred Journeys. Sacred Journeys an engaging travelling exhibit about Indigenous canoe culture. At a fundamental level, it is about cultural revival,cultural health and cross cultural understanding. By touring15-20 major BC museums and Indigenous cultural centres over 4-5 years, it will engage and educate 10,000s of visitors from children to leaders. Appropriately, the exhibit will become a permanent display in Bella Bella, where it will continue to inspire both visitors and community members alike. Through its many teachings, metaphors, and values, the ocean going canoe was and is central to the daily life, culture, and spirituality of First Peoples of the Pacific Coast. Almost lost through the effects of colonization and technology, the Heiltsuk were instrumental in reviving this canoe culture and for the first time will share their story. Against the norm of museums, this story will be produced an told from Indigenous peoples prospective. By walking through a stylized ocean going canoe one will be able to touch a screen embedded in the symbolic supernatural paddles ; each screen will share the Indigenous people’s history, culture and stories, leading to the present, with an option to comment and ask questions. It will inspire visitors to engage in the revival of the Indigenous culture, thus leading to better health and wellness in our local communities and educating the general public.
$223,000.00
2017

Institute of Families for Child & Youth Mental Health

FamilySmart Network - Ready, Set, Collaborate

The World Health Organization developed a Framework for action that speaks to the necessity for interprofessional education in order to achieve collaborative practice & the Institute of Families believes this can be broadened by testing the inclusion of young people & families in collective learning that results in all being collaborative practice ready. We have tangible experiences, skills and examples that will be built on in our proposed test. For research expertise we will partner with the McCreary Centre & Stigma & Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre (SARAVYC). Our project is to test & prove our belief that there is a pre-step before implementation of collaborative practice, which we refer to as being ‘Practice Ready’ & offer recommendations & practical practices for how to ensure professionals & youth & families are ready & able to collaborate successfully together. We will build on the current knowledge & experience that we have in engagement, empowerment, collaborating & connecting & invite all disciplines to come along-side young people & families to collectively learn from each other & prepare to be collaborative practice ready. We believe that professionals & lay people can & should be empowered & supported to be contributors & influencers. Everyone has distinct & specialized knowledge that is valuable & necessary to build communities where children, youth & families are safe, included, connected & supported. They are all interdisciplinary team members.
$225,000.00
2016

Justice For Girls

Justice For Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre

JFG aims to influence systemic change in the education system by developing a Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre. This 3-year project will lay the foundation to pilot such a centre which will address the critical need for an innovative and integrated model of support, education and advocacy necessary for young women to truly transition out of poverty, homelessness, instability and violence. There are four ways that this project will influence systemic change: 1. Outreach and advocacy for girls marginalized from the school system • Targeted educational support and advocacy to facilitate school connection/reconnection and completion, freedom from violence, and adequate housing 2. Girls' Education & Empowerment • Girls rights education workshops in schools 3. Young Women’s Leadership program • 5-month full-time program providing an income, training and grade 12 or college-level course credits to young women as a pathway to graduation and leadership • young women will contribute experiential knowledge and peer support within JFG, and build the capacity of the education system by bringing their perspectives to education policies, programs and professional training 4. Public Education and Training • Professional development training for teachers, teachers in training, school counsellors and other education professionals • Public awareness campaigns • Engagement of partners, community stakeholders and champions to influence systemic change
$225,000.00
2017

Lookout Society

Tide Pools: Art Thrives

The Lookout Society has worked with people with low or no income who have few, if any, housing or support options for over 40 years in the DTES area. Regaining and maintaining stability requires access to healthy choices and livelihoods. For many here this includes creative practices and social programs. Through our partnership with Gallery Gachet this project will strengthen outreach to community art programs. We will grow external relations to enhance training and mentorship. We can advance our community artists’ livelihoods. The Canada Council recognizes arts training beyond college and university education and includes mentorship, a history of exhibition, peer recognition and civic arts involvement as contributing to an artist’s profile. We can increase artist’s access to artist fees and recognize the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2014 decision to protect the minimal rights of artists to be paid. We will find new and alternative venues for exhibition, performance, sales and social engagement and we will broaden our participation in realms of cultural production beyond our neighbourhood. This project will advance both outreach and 'inreach'. With the support of staff and volunteers we will improve points of contact with culture-producing venues to gain and share a clear picture of arts programming. Identifying gaps, Gallery Gachet will create new educational opportunities and form a community alliance for the arts.
$225,000.00
2016

Massey Theatre Society

Indigenous Arts Series (Skookum Arts Series)

The Skookum Indigenous Arts Series will celebrate some of the most dynamic Aboriginal Theatre artists, musicians, dance artists, visual and media artists from across the country. This arts celebration will help to raise awareness of First Nations talent, artistic practices, and foster cultural exchange and dialogue. With this, Massey Theatre Society is creating a new program to create a focus in its physical and cultural renewal. This celebration project will priorities inclusion of indigenous artists at the forefront as the theatre enters its 70th anniversary year and beyond. Innovation is furthered by the accompanying goals of identifying a presenting network for the series moving it beyond its host community and developing Savage Society's capacity to promote the program on an ever widening network creating opportunities to showcase Savage Society's productions along with other Aboriginal Performance works. Savage Society, an aboriginal theatre company and partner in this project has a curatorial goal is to create an arts series that brings participants into a shared experience of indigenous arts and culture in a way that is inviting, inspiring and illuminating. Performances will include dance, theatre, and music. We will also showcase Indigenous films, animation, literary and media artists and visual artists. We intend to promote socio-political dialogue as well in partnership with community organizers and institutions.
$225,000.00
2017

McCreary Centre Society

Youth Research Academy

Building on the success of previous McCreary projects which have taught research skills and supported experiential youth (including those with care experience), we propose to establish a Youth Research Academy which will train one cohort of youth in and from government care each year. Participants will be trained to design, deliver, analyze and disseminate research projects of interest to youth with care experience and service providers. The Academy will also offer opportunities for additional youth to engage in more condensed research training projects. At least one research project conducted each year will be in partnership with the Federation of BC Youth In Care Networks (FBCYICN). FBCYICN had already identified the research projects it would like Academy participants to complete in Years 1 and 2. Once the first cohort of Academy participants have been trained, the Academy will take on additional research and evaluation projects for other agencies. Project goals include increasing youth led/driven research; training youth in and from care in community based research and dissemination; supporting youth and partner agencies to consider advocacy opportunities identified within the research; assisting participants to develop marketable skills; offering community agencies access to trained youth researchers who can conduct research projects of interest to those agencies; and offering evidence of the success of this model of engaging and supporting vulnerable youth.
$225,000.00
2015

NEC Native Education College

Northwest Coast Arts Heritage Project

The project will develop and strengthen networks and systems for Northwest Coast First Nations traditional cultural arts education and transmission. The project will build on the successful Northwest Coast Jewellery Arts certificate program at the NEC and the credit laddering partnership with Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Project partnerships will expand to the Kwaguilth, Nuu-Chah-Nulth, Haida, Tsimsian, Gitksan and Nisga'a Nations to develop further structures for formline art and silver carving transmission. This will include links with the Aboriginal owned cultural tourism facilities including the Haida Cultural Centre, U'Mista Cultural Museum, Aboriginal Tourism BC and educational facilities such as the Wilp Wilxo'osh'whl Nisga'a College and the Frieda Deising School of Northwest Coast Art. In addition to one delivery of the Northwest Coast Jewellery Arts certificate program in Vancouver, the program will be delivered in partnership with one First Nation or First Nations organization on Vancouver Island and one on the north coast over the duration of the project. The support letters from the community of Skidegate on Haida Gwaii and three First Nations near Port Hardy on Vancouver Island are appended. A diploma level of the program or a second certificate in Arts and Cultural Management will be developed by the project.
$224,000.00
2016

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

The Restoring Right Relationship Circle Training Project

Systemic racial discrimination against Indigenous peoples, resulting in extensive violence, harm, marginalization and inequity that causes institutionalized ill-health, trauma, poverty and violence for Indigenous peoples, will be countered with the growth of community-based Indigenous Restoraing Right Relationship skills and tools infrastructure amongst over 18 Indigenous-focused urban aboriginal agencies in the Vancouver Inner City. The pilot connects personal and interpersonal Indigenous restorative skills and behaviours with agency, policy and structural supports to develop a critical mass of healing, positive, restorative Indigenous and Indigenous-Ally relationships and community.
$225,000.00
2017

Options Community Services

Supported Youth Independent Housing Program (SYIH)

This is a subsidized housing and support program designed for youth in the Surrey area who are 16 to 24 and do not have stable housing. The program will help youth learn techniques in maintaining stabilized housing while also receiving one-to-one life skills training support. Youth workers will also be available for support in the evening through their Intensive Support and Supervision Program.
$220,000.00
2010

Pacific AIDS Network

Collective Collaboration : An Initiative to Build Capacity & Engagement to Impact BC’s HCV Landscape

People living with hepatitis C (HCV) in British Columbia want to contribute to the development of public health strategies. However, community-based organizations lack resources to ensure their involvement in leadership & decision-making. Establishing a Peer Leadership Development program to build capacity of People with Lived Experience of HCV will enable equitable participation. The foundation is the principle ‘Nothing About Us, Without Us’; it aims to articulate the rights of people living with HCV, impact policy changes & maximize the potential for reducing new infections.
$225,000.00
2017

Pacific Autism Family Centre Society

GO Group

The GO Group strategy seeks to address the gap in employment equity services, with a focus on providing relevant vocational skills building and tangible work experience. Given our internal capacity, PAFC is uniquely able to implement a robust social enterprise strategy to fulfill operational needs. GO Group is a multi-venture social enterprise with a vocational development backbone; the GO Group ventures are: 1) GO Café, 2) GO Custodial, 3) GO Landscaping, 4) GO Business Solutions and 5) GO Innovation. GO (Goal Oriented) positions are paid, part-time employment positions, with a term ranging from 6 months to 2 years, based on person centered intake process, planning and goal acquisition. The intent of the GO position term is for individuals to articulate specific goals within a skill development framework focused on a position/industry they are interested in. When goals are achieved, individuals will be referred to an employment placement agency. PAFC will then assist the agency in securing the GO employee mainstream community employment. All operations would be inclusive, the ratio of neuro-typical staff to individuals with diverse abilities will depend on the business specific requirements of each venture. All GO employment is intentionally supportive with in house job coaching and support staff, specialized learning tools and peer mentorship components, all run through a standardized tracking and reporting method, such as the Open Badges learning management software.
$224,850.00
2016

Phoenix Transition Society

Harmony House: Holistic Perinatal Supportive Housing for Women Struggling with Substance Use

The proposed project aims to provide upstream prevention and early intervention supports to women struggling with substance use, especially Indigenous women, while they are pregnant and during the post-partum period using a decolonizing approach. The project will 1) provide safe and supportive housing in Prince George that will deliver a harm reduction, holistic model of care that has only previously been modeled in large urban centers and, 2) provide comprehensive services targeted at pregnant substance-using women adressing medical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. The program will assist women to gain life-skills, Elder mentorship, ready access to pre and postpartum education and support, assistance in moving into independent living with their infants, and break generational cycles of substance-use and child apprehension in communities. An important, and unique aspect of this project will be incorporation of Indigenous traditions and approaches to health with Aboriginal grandmothers at the center of our approach. Our project will influence systemic change towards health and well-being by targeting social determinants affecting vulnerable, pregnant women. More than solely housing, our approach aims to model culturally safe, wrap-around care for at risk women in a way that is highly scalabe to other rural and remote settings. Furthermore, this project follows a holistic and decolonizing approach to care - an emergent approach to providing care accross the north.
$225,000.00
2016

Queer Arts Festival

UnSettling: A Vision from the Margins

This 3­-year commitment redirects established flows of money & power with strategic hires at key levels—intentional & visible placements of Queer People Of Colour (QPOC) in positions of cultural authority & focused initiatives to nurture promising emerging QPOC cultural workers into future arts leaders. QAF engages Adrian Stimson (Siksika), T’uy’tanat-­Cease Wyss (Skwxwu7mesh/Sto:Lo) & Valérie d. Walker to curate our 2017­-19 visual art exhibitions respectively, with engagements in public discourse, outreach & collaborations with diverse partners. Guest lectures at grunt, ECUAD, UBC, & SFU increase QPOC visibility in public & academic contemporary visual art discourse. Exhibition tours for queer, Indigenous & street-­involved youth, artist panels & public fora provide entry points to the often exclusive visual art milieu through direct contact with QPOC role models. The project also engages emerging QPOC arts administrator Kimberly Sayson in full­-time, multi­-year paid mentorship & an emerging exhibition preparator, cultivating well-­rounded competencies & leadership skills. By interrupting the cyclical narrative of exclusion, we increase individual experience, income & influence for QPOC curators, artists & administrators that they can leverage toward future opportunities; improve organizational resilience by expanding perspectives & networks; & shift cultural beliefs to re­vision QPOC identity as a site for expertise & creative self­-authorship rather than a mark of disenfranchisement.
$225,000.00
2017

St. Paul's Foundation of Vancouver

Expanding Peer Involvement in Substance Use Care

Our project seeks to expand the involvement of the affected population – people who use drugs (PWUD) – within the substance use system of care. We see this as important and timely given the present overdose-related public health emergency. Our goal is to affect change by: • Reducing the stigma surrounding PWUD by involving them more extensively within the system of care; • Training peer health navigators to be present on site at treatment facilities and to serve as linkages to care, thereby offering further support to those seeking substance use treatment; • Providing valuable feedback to health care providers by soliciting the feedback of PWUD on presently available treatment options.
$223,998.00
2017

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