Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

British Columbia Civil Liberties Association

A Right to Food? Food Security for BC's Poorest Kids

The project will study the potential legal and constitutional rights implications of childhood malnutrition in BC. Working with other not-for-profit groups and social science experts, we will interview families on social assistance across BC focusing on the experiences of children living with food insecurity. We will compile a report with these narratives and analyze the issue of childhood malnutrition from a uniquely legal rights-based perspective that considers whether children can fully realize their constitutionally protected rights and freedoms while in a state of malnourishment. In documenting the impact of food insecurity on the enjoyment of constitutional rights, this project will provide a platform on which community groups can build their education initiatives to include a legal rights-based analysis. This research may enable further advocacy by affected communities and education of government and judicial decision-makers to ensure that food insecurity does not compromise children's rights.
$40,000.00
2013

Encompass Support Services Society

Program Coordination and Enhancement for 0-6 Services

This project will address the recent EDI results in the Langley Communities by providing some coordination of programs to further enhance our Aldergrove programs as well as expand programs to a growing neighbourhood in Langley (Willoughby). Utilizing the successes of our programs in Aldergrove and Langley, we would like to support the Langley community planning process through enhancement of services to areas where population growth is occurring. In Willoughby specifically, we would be mirroring services through our prenatal nutrition services, outreach and family resource programs, and aim to partner with an immunization clinic once a week. With expansion of programs and Willoughby being designated as a growing are of need, this coordinator would help develop and enhance a direct service hub within the Willoughby area. By providing nutritional support, it would enhance our Aldergrove Services creating a focus on healthy living.
$40,000.00
2013

PLEA Community Services Society of BC

Sto:lo Nation KidStart

PLEA and Sto:lo Nation's Community Development Department have agreed to work together to implement the KidStart Mentoring Program for children and youth living in Sto:lo Nation's Traditional Territory. KidStart was developed by PLEA 27 years ago and has already been successfully replicated in Campbell River, Courtenay and Victoria. These programs serve Aboriginal youth from the communities served, but this is the first time the program will be implemented with a specifically Aboriginal focus. KidStart's goal is to provide each participant with the opportunity to develop a supportive relationship with a Volunteer Mentor who is a consistent and positive role model. Mentors plan weekly activities in the community that will provide participants with experiences that will foster a sense of personal achievement, reinforce their strengths, and create new interests. The program is fundamentally preventative, rooted in the belief and supported by research that early engagement with a mentor improves participants' capacity to overcome adversity and become more active in their communities.
$50,000.00
2013

Project Limelight Society

Project Limelight - Performing Arts Program

Recognizing a need for a creative outlet for youth living in Vancouver’s DTES, Project Limelight Society developed a free performing arts program, running four months long, twice a year. Participants are introduced to various theatre arts disciplines such as acting, creative writing, singing, mask, dance, stand-up comedy and improvisation. Participants spend 3 months rehearsing a full length production and then perform on a professional stage, giving them the opportunity to showcase everything they’ve accomplished. The last show was performed to two sold-out audiences of more than 600 people. Project Limelight Society provides food security and a safe place to build a community, which is particularly important for families who are also dealing with the additional challenges of addiction, poverty, discrimination or isolation. Providing this outlet for their children is very important to the families in our community, and it is reflected in the pride they experience, when they see their children perform.
$50,000.00
2013

Richmond Family Place Society

Family Fun Cafe Project

The Family Fun Cafe project will provide free nutritious home cooked meals and healthy snacks to those families accessing the evening food banks. The project will deliver a family resource program focussing on family support, early learning and child development activities. The project will reach vulnerable and isolated families that do not typically access our universal family resource programs; in addition to this over time the project will facilitate a bridge for those families to more actively participate in mainstream family resource and early childhood development programs. By participating in this innovative project children will receive programming that is developmentally appropriate, enhance their learning, build their skills and confidence, increase their self-esteem and build strong supportive networks. Programs focus on learning through fun activities that are play based and provide opportunities for social and emotional development. The project will focus on providing parents with the necessary skills and resources to ensure their children reach their full potential.
$40,000.00
2013

Society for Children and Youth of BC

Municipal Strategies for Implementing Child and Youth Friendly Communities

The concept of child and youth friendly communities (CYFC) is “not based on an ideal end state or a standard model. It is a framework to assist any city to become more child-friendly in all aspects of governance, environment and services*.” SCY will partner with the City of New Westminster (NW) and The City of Surrey Community and Recreation Services Department (CRS) to implement this concept. Results will be unique to each community depending on their particular needs and the stage to which they have already implemented CYFC concepts. NW is interested in an overarching CYFC vision to attach its initiatives and to engage more children, youth, and families in planning the CYFC vision. They have a particular interest in guidelines around family friendly housing. CRS is interested in how the CYFC vision and their existing city Child and Youth Friendly Strategy can shape the implementation of their 0-18 Framework, including staff training and department policies and practices. *BUILDING CHILD FRIENDLY CITIES, A Framework for Action (page 2-3), UNICEF, 2004
$40,000.00
2013

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

"Amlilas": Toward a 'Namgis Community-Driven Curriculum for Early Childhood Development'

This project addresses an identified priority of the 'Namgis First Nations people living in Alert Bay, British Columbia - to enhance the cultural relevance of early childhood education (ECE) so that children are entrenched in their language and cultural practices from their earliest days. Amlilas is the community's existing early childhood program. Through a community-based participatory process, we will build on the existing strengths of this program to support a more culturally relevant curriculum - creating a place where young 'Namgis children learn within their cultural traditions and language. Drawing on existing indicators of early childhood development and data generated in this project, we will propose curricular strategies reflecting unique dimensions of ECD within this community. The knowledge generated in this project will enhance the cultural relevance of ECD for 'Namgis First Nation children and contribute to knowledge informing ECD curricular planning and implementation within First Nations communities in British Columbia.
$40,000.00
2013

West Coast LEAF Association

Mothering with Disabilities

This project will investigate legal and policy reform solutions to the challenges that disabled mothers encounter. We will collect qualitative data using feminist narrative inquiry (focus groups and semi-structured interviews with mothers with disabilities, and women with disabilities seeking to be mothers) and through interviews with key informants (service providers and advocates). We will also conduct legal research. Research questions include: 1. What are the legal issues facing mothers with disabilities? 2. What are the legal rights of mothers with disabilities and how do existing laws and policies impact these women’s rights as parents? 3. How should these laws and policies be reformed to ensure greater respect for the rights of mothers with disabilities? We anticipate addressing the following topics: reproductive rights; child protection; adoption law; family law; immigration law; social services; violence against mothers with disabilities; and employer responsibilities. Findings will be presented in a report to policy-makers, and will include law reform recommendations.
$43,000.00
2013