Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Quesnel

Organizational Development

We are a very efficient and successful agency. In 2009, with only 1.7 FTE staff, the organization served over 120 children/youth in the community. The Executive Director is responsible for fund development, marketing, strategic planning, community involvement, organizational development, board related tasks and overall operations. She is also responsible for all mentoring programs (casework duties - recruiting/screening/training volunteer; screening children/youth matching and monitoring. The Administrative/Marketing Assistant' s duties include: office manager, bookkeeping,financial duties, and local fundraising events coordinator). An In-School /Teen Mentor Coordinator position would help to sustain the integrity of the school program and the continued need for mentors. The Executive Director would then be better able to address other pertinent areas such as fund development, building more community partnerships and financial sustainability. To continue to maintain our high standard of servicce, we need to augment our staff.
$40,000.00
2010

Birthing Families Foundation

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Boys and Girls Clubs of South Coast BC

Pre-Teen Nights

This project addresses the need for evening programming for pre-teens and helps them deal with issues they face as they become teens. It will provide support and social and recreational skill building to pre-teens in a safe, supportive space at six sites in Metro Vancouver. They integrate social and recreational activities with discussions and themes in order to provide a comfortable environment for individuals to raise issues they face moving into the teen years.
$45,000.00
2010

British Columbia Civil Liberties Association

A Right to Food? Food Security for BC's Poorest Kids

The project will study the potential legal and constitutional rights implications of childhood malnutrition in BC. Working with other not-for-profit groups and social science experts, we will interview families on social assistance across BC focusing on the experiences of children living with food insecurity. We will compile a report with these narratives and analyze the issue of childhood malnutrition from a uniquely legal rights-based perspective that considers whether children can fully realize their constitutionally protected rights and freedoms while in a state of malnourishment. In documenting the impact of food insecurity on the enjoyment of constitutional rights, this project will provide a platform on which community groups can build their education initiatives to include a legal rights-based analysis. This research may enable further advocacy by affected communities and education of government and judicial decision-makers to ensure that food insecurity does not compromise children's rights.
$40,000.00
2013

BCCLA Rural Education & Outreach Project

To develop and implement a model for low-overhead, membership-driven, community-based civil liberties and human rights advocacy and education groups that provide aboriginal and rural community members with legal information and peer casework advocacy support. This model would also offers opportunities for civil libertiesrelated education and interactive workshops by local and long-distance lawyers, advocates and experts, and build relationships between rural communities and urban service providers, lawyers and advocates on civil liberties and human rights issues.
$40,000.00
2010

British Columbia Council for Families

Celebrating All Families: Building LGBTQ Inclusive Programs

The BC Council for Families, with an advisory committee of parents, community representatives and service providers, and working collaboratively LGBTQ organizations, will develop specialized educational resources for parent educators and others who work with parents, on the needs of same-sex parents and their children. Resources will focus on raising awareness of the potential for heterosexual bias in programming, and on approaches to make programs more welcoming and inclusive for LGBTQ-led families and children. Because of the need to reach practitioners in smaller centres around BC, the Council will investigate several dissemination models – creating a video and accompanying workbook that agencies can use to hold their own in-service discussions and trainings, and/or train the trainer workshops at conferences or by webinar. Project activities will include developing and disseminating tip sheets for family service practitioners, a podcast series of interviews with experts and parents exploring issues relevant to LGBTQ families as well as a training video and workbook.
$43,000.00
2012

Canadian Institute of Reading Recovery

Targeted Early Intervention for Literacy - A Vancouver Training Institute

Reading Recovery is an evidenced-based effective 12-20 week intervention that changes the life trajectory of the students. It is based on the understanding that for children who are struggling to learn to read, the best investment is a highly trained teacher. The RR Network for professional development is three-tiered. Teachers in schools receive an additional year's training and ongoing mentoring from a Teacher Leader. The teachers then support the 15 - 25% of grade one students who are struggling to read with expert one-on-one teaching. The Teacher Leaders are trained for a year by Regional Trainers. BC does not currently have a resident Regional Trainer and candidates have to travel to Winnipeg or Toronto for a full year to receive the training. This project aims to establish a Centre in Vancouver to support the Teacher Leaders in the Region and to meet the training demands created as the program expands throughout the Region. Working with the Vancouver School District and others in the Region, the CIRR will train and support Teacher Leaders for RR.
$41,450.00
2013

Canadian Mental Health Association - BC Division

Living Life to the Full: increasing connection and resiliency among BC youth

Adolescence is a high-risk time for mental health problems like depression and anxiety and a key time to boost coping skills. Living Life to the Full (LLTTF) is an evidence-based course designed to teach youth skills for dealing with life's challenges. In 8 fun group sessions the course examines worry, low mood, isolation, healthy thinking, problem-solving, confidence, and anger. Canadian Mental Health Association, BC Division (CMHA BC) and its Blue Wave Youth Team (aged 13-18) have adapted the course for BC youth. Older youth facilitators delivered pilot courses in three BC communities in summer 2014, and a Fall evaluation is being used to improve the materials. The course will be delivered to 28 communities in urban and rural communities in 2015-2016. It will equip 560 youth with coping skills that promote resilience, reduce the risk of mental illness and risky behaviours, and encourage connection and engagement with peers and community. Investments in training will build community capacity to reach hundreds more youth BC-wide annually after 2016.
$45,054.00
2014

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Changing the face of conservation

Conservation is based on a colonial model that has a long history of contributing to systemic oppression, devaluing non-white worldviews, and Indigenous erasure. Governments would move people off land, violate their title and rights, and designate the area a park or protected area. Not surprisingly then, land and ocean conservation movements, and the people that work in conservation, are predominantly white and middle class. Meanwhile, marginalized communities are often the most affected by changes in climate or the environment, and today’s youth will bear the long-term burden of our current choices. As part of our ongoing work to both decolonize our organization – and influence decolonization in the movement – and to create more spaces for marginalized voices in decision making processes, we would like to more proactively challenge the status quo. While we do more decolonization, anti-oppression and diversity, equity and inclusion work with our staff and board, we would also like to create two new roles on our staff team for young Indigenous youth and folks of colour. The goal would be to have them work directly within our program teams and be fully engaged in decision making, policy development (both at an organizational level and a government level), and all aspects of programming. They will be mentored by staff at the organization to develop strong skills, while having space to shape conservation plans with their own knowledge and experience.
$50,000.00
2018

Canadian Society for Social Development

Internet Business Development for Entrepreneurs (IBDE)

IBDE is an online, accredited training program that helps persons with disabilities (PWD) become web designers or establish a business website. Curriculum is accessed from www.ibde.ca, allowing participants to learn comfortably from home. Participants receive one-on-one assistance from qualified, caring personnel who understand the challenges they face. Assistance is offered in our virtual classroom and through instant messaging, email, and telephone. We offer two IBDE programs: (1) IBDE Web Essentials, a six-month introductory web design program, and (2) IBDE Web Advanced, a four-month program offering training in web programming and web marketing. Through this project we plan to provide supports to 17 individuals in total, eleven in IBDE Web Advanced and six in IBDE Web Essentials. This project will increase employment for PWD by equipping them with technical skills and experience that are in high demand by employers and the business community.
$40,000.00
2011

CanAssist, University of Victoria

Addendum to "Apps for Employment" (DSF12-0037)

CanAssist had initially proposed developing apps on the Apple platform in our 2012 request, targeting release on the Apple App Store at the conclusion of the project so that they are available to people with disabilities on a wider scale. This decision was made as support apps for the disability community traditionally have been overwhelmingly written for Apple devices. Through consultation with the Employment Apps Advisory Committee (clients, their job coaches and service providers), we have learned that device use among the target population accessing supported employment services is now more in line with the general population, with Android representing the majority of users. In fact, due to the lower cost of Android-based devices, these devices are now common for individuals with disabilities that may be living on a fixed or lower income. In order to maximize the accessibility of the apps created from this initiative, CanAssist would like to develop them on both Android and Apple platforms (and by extension, easing future versions for Blackberry or Windows Phone devices).
$50,000.00
2014

Teen Work and Tech Work

The concept for TeenWork originated during discussions in 2008 among a group of partners, informally called the Greater Victoria Supported Teen Employment Consortium, the members of which provide a wide range of disability support services across Greater Victoria and the surrounding areas. CanAssist acted as the catalyst to bring this group together and continues to play the role of faciliatator and secretariat for all Consortium activities. The TeenWork program is a truly innovative pilot project designed to change the life path of young people with special needs by helping them find and retain part-time employment. A TeenWork staff member works with participating teens and their families, as well as local businesses, to prepare each youth for a part-time job and help them find work. A job coach then works with the teens as each develops new skills and becomes comfortable in his or her position.
$45,000.00
2011

Carcross/Tagish First Nation

Sensitive Ecosystem Mapping & Holistic Land Use Planning

Carcross/Tagish First Nation (CTFN) is a Tlingit self-governing First Nation that began the process of Holistic Land Planning in 2012. An Environmental Scan began in December of 2012 with the goal of synthesizing all current, historical and relevant data. Nearing completion, the final steps include; sensitive ecosystem mapping, community engagement, implementation planning and finalization of the land use plan. Work will be conducted exclusively in the BC portion of the Traditional Territory (TT) addressing the habitat needs of identified species at risk through the development of a land use plan for the conservation and preservation of these valuable areas. The benefits of this project will extend beyond the Southern Lakes area; facilitating proactive ecosystem based planning and management, meeting the priorities of the Carcross/Tagish First Nation, the priorities and recommendations of the Southern Lakes Wildlife Coordinating Committee, planning and research priorities of Species at Risk Management Plans and will assist in the conservation and protection of critical habitat.
$50,000.00
2014

Central Vancouver Island Multicultural Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$40,000.00
2021

Cetus Research & Conservation Society

Expanding Killer Whale Protection

The effects of living in a heavily industrialized,urbanized area & a massive increase in vessel traffic (as well as the live-capture business which killed/captured at least 47) has put intense pressure on KWs. With a complete picture of vessel interactions, this project will enhance their immediate well being and contribute to bringing about the systemic change necessary for their survival. The southern resident population has fluctuated since the 70's (hitting a known high of 98) but is now at 78, with the loss of 6 individuals in the last year. Their crisis is caused entirely by human activities. Only meaningful action on our part will bring about the conditions needed for them to survive.
$45,000.00
2017

Check Your Head: The Youth Global Education Network

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$40,000.00
2021

Workshop Enhancement Project

For more than 10 years, Check Your Head has been presenting workshops on key global issues to high school students, reaching over 70,000 youth. They started with globalization and now have 13 workshops in high demand from youth and educators from across Metro Vancouver and BC. This demand coupled with the pace of social change makes updating and improving their workshops a significant challenge. They seek support for all of their high school workshops in order to remain effective, accessible and affordable to all populations and schools.
$40,000.00
2010

Chemainus Theatre Festival Society

The Discovery Series (the Series)

The Discovery Series is a dynamic, diverse season of theatre for youth and family audiences, presented by Chemainus Theatre Festival Society. Munsch Ado About Nothing celebrates the work of Robert Munsch in Shakespearean style. The Remarkable Emily Carr partners with Victoria playwright Susan Shillingford. Wilde Holiday Shorts engages local artists and students in creating a 45-minute image-rich work based on Oscar Wilde’s short stories. The Society aims to demonstrate a strong commitment to local audiences and developing new work.
$40,000.00
2010

Children's Health Foundation of Vancouver Island

HerWay Home

HerWay Home (HWH) supports pregnant or early parenting women who are impacted by drug or alcohol use, have experienced violence or abuse, and often face mental health challenges. The program focuses on women and their families who face multiple barriers to good health, healthy babies and safe lives. The outcomes of HWH are an increased number of mothers who have healthy pregnancies, keep their babies, and establish successful families. HWH includes integrated health and social services for these women with 'complex' lives, services which focus on their substance use and interrelated issues. Services are provided through drop-in groups, outreach and personal one-on-one support. Pre- and post-natal support and information is provided by a Public Health Nurse, and HWH facilitators operate a Recovery Group. Women access one-to-one counselling support, breastfeeding and child feeding support, parenting information, infant development resources, a dietician, an income assistance worker and a dental hygienist. Staff also work with the women to obtain necessary health care services.
$40,000.00
2014

Chilliwack Community Services

Gateway Family Literacy Programs

Chilliwack Community Services (CCS)delivers two dynamic adult upgrading programs in partnership with the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV). While parents pursue grade 9, 10 & 11 math and English upgrading courses their infant/toddler and preschool children receive free childcare in a high quality, literacy rich environment. Participant demographics include marginalized families, families living in poverty and “at risk” situations, First Nations, and immigrants. CCS has over 20 years experience in operating these family literacy programs. The agency’s Strategic Plan includes a goal of expanding both family literacy programs to operate 10 months a year, and a new and very exciting initiative to extend the program to include workplace essential skills. This expansion addresses the root causes of social and economic inequality by providing practical work place, pre-employment skills as well as one on one employment counseling. Participants may now register for 10 months wrap-around programming offering free upgrading with a UFV instructor, parenting instruction, workplace.
$40,000.00
2014

Chinese Community Library Services Association

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$40,000.00
2021

Community Social Planning Council of Greater Victoria

Youth Employment Development for the Capital Region

This is a Youth Employment Development Initiative to prototype and test best practices and models we have identified in other places in Canada to create effective labour market pathways for young people who are disadvantaged. We have conducted research for the Enterprising Non Profit Program and the BC Centre for Employment Excellence on models in other jurisdictions of employment development systems inclusive of "employment social enterprises" to create pathways for young people to sustainable livelihoods. We discovered that there are best practices in engaging and promoting employer partnerships with community training agencies that are market based and entrepreneurial We are proposing to adapt and test these models in our own region which currently lacks infrastructure for youth employment development. We also intend to engage a larger group of stakeholders in BC in a learning community on our experiences and lessons learned to inform practices in other regions, through our partnerships with the Canadian Community Economic Development Network and the BC Centre for Employment Excellence. We will have a strong evaluation component to test impacts on income, skills and educational attainment, and employment to share with policy and program stakeholders to embrace more innovative and effective public policy. We will test this model in growth sectors of the economy that also have sustainability impacts, like the resource recycling and renewable energy sectors.
$50,000.00
2015

Pathways From Poverty - Community Action Plan on Poverty

In 2012, the Community Social Planning Council (CSPC) led a process that developed an Action Plan on Poverty (CAPP) to address the need for coordinated responses for poverty prevention and reduction in the Capital Region. Community stakeholders identified two priority areas within our Action Plan that currently lack the appropriate infrastructure in our region to provide “pathways out of poverty”. These two pathways are financial literacy, and social enterprises that offer training opportunities for low-income residents to experience greater economic self-sufficiency. To facilitate the expansion of these pathways, we are leading the development of a community strategy for financial literacy for the Capital Region and exploring innovative ways to support the creation of social and training enterprises with community partners. We are seeking funding for projects that contribute towards these pathways, with an overall theme of creating opportunities for economic empowerment of people with low incomes and barriers to employment.
$50,000.00
2014

Community-Based Research Centre Society

Mapping the Intersects of Determinants and Development in Young Gay Men (Dr. Terry Trussler)

CBRC and HIM in cooperation with a network of collaborating agencies will develop and conduct the first Determinants Survey of gay men in BC in order to investigate how health determinants affect young gay men (YGM) ages 18 to 26 – a critical transition on the road to gay adulthood. According to the most recent HIV surveillance study conducted in Vancouver (Moore et al. 2010), 1 in 5 (20%) local gay youths will likely have an HIV infection by the time they reach 30 if current conditions continue. We wish to investigate how social factors have determined this outcome. A Young Investigators Team will receive operational training in all aspects of survey research including question development, sample recruitment and statistical analysis. The research activities will be nested within the day to day life of HIM, a community health organization offering counseling and STI testing services. The baseline data gained from this research will help inform future community level programs and social policy. This research would represent a breakthrough in knowledge development for gay men’s health.
$47,000.00
2010

Cowichan Family Caregivers Support Society

Being Heard: A Youth Caregivers Program

This three year project is a natural extension of the successful Ending the Silence project which uncovered the challenges faced by youth caregivers. These youth courageously take on responsibilities beyond their years to care for a family member in need. They work hard to keep their families together and often feel overwhelmed because they have nowhere to turn for help. Struggling alone with the stresses of their role can adversely affect their mental and physical health, relationships, schooling, job prospects and finances. This project is the first in BC to develop a program that supports these valiant but troubled youth. The program will include: support groups; 1-on-1 emotional support; family support; work with health-care, education and social service systems to provide respite, help at school and other supports in the mainstream and First Nations communities. Two areas of focus will be outreach to youth caregivers and training for service providers. All work will be guided by a youth-led resource team of diverse youth, including caregiving youth, and mentoring adults.
$40,000.00
2012

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