Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Nawican Advancement Society o/a Nawican Friendship Centre

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Nelson CARES Society

Earth Matters ECO Store Year 3

Earth Matters ECO Store Year 3
$49,650.00
2010

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Social Credit Lending System For Young People

The goal of the project is to assess the viability of a social credit lending system for young people who have aged out of care. During crises, these young people often lack a financial safety net. NICCSS has undertaken preliminary conversations with YACs from VACFSS and Aunt Leah's in order to locate the gaps for young people who have aged out of care that could be filled by an ethical lending system. They reported that young people often lack funds for basic needs such as food, housing, medical cost and transportation, as well for aspirational needs like technology, education, career and personal development. The project would work with young people, community partners, financial institutions, health care providers, housing providers, and corporations to develop an ethical social credit lending system responsive to the needs of young people, giving them choice without miring them in needless debt. The project would work to establish a social credit score system whereby young people would receive "credit" for demonstrating connectedness to community and pro-social activities that would give them access to much-needed capital. Young people often face poverty; the project’s repayment system would allow young people to be successful in meeting the terms of their loan by accepting cash repayments, as well as goal-related and meaningful experiences such as volunteer work or work skills development, which will further increase community connections and pro-social activities.
$50,000.00
2016

Community Planning Capacity for Development of Collective Impact Strategies

This project would expand on existing relationships to develop a placed-based community response strategy addressing the underlying issues putting our youth at risk. Establishing strategic coordination and collaboration between After-Hours, MCFD, VACFSS, VPD, non-profit organizations, housing providers and landlords, Hospital Emergency and health care. The creation of a comprehensive strategy resulting in the collaboration of multiple stakeholders rather the crisis driven intervention response that currently exists. A two-pronged approach will enhance the community's ability to continue work with youth at risk while facilitating the needed changes. Implementing a Circle of Care through one to one work with youth, their identified supports and networks; addressing both immediate needs and facilitating community involvement in the place-based community response strategy. This would result in the creation of a cooperative integrated model that builds the capacity of the community and strengthens positive outcomes for youth.
$49,800.00
2014

Northern Family Health Society

Mothers for Recovery Peer Mentoring Project

This project is a women centered, peer driven initiative that offers support, encouragement, awareness in personal journeys and mentoring for mothers struggling with addiction. It aims to enhance the group by providing bi-weekly mentorship workshops for the mothers, including resources and wages for two senior mothers in recovery to facilitate one mentoring workshop a week. The second workshop every week will be facilitated by community professionals on various topics pertaining to the recovery process.
$40,000.00
2011

Nuu-chah-nulthaht/WCVI Aquatic Management Society

The Future is Born from the Seeds of the Past

West Coast Aquatic Management Society proposes an intergenerational leadership project that brings together successful people who have a strong connection to the West Coast of Vancouver Island with young First Nations who show leadership capacity. The program will provide an opportunity for leaders to mentor youth in business, governance, management and science, thus building bridges between generations and building capacity in the region. One of the key opportunities that WCA has identified in its extensive consultations is building capacity of young leaders in the region by connecting them with leaders. Traditionally NTC youth were involved in mentorships (haa-huu-paa), but that system was broken by the residential schools. We believe that good leadership is key to making things happen. Part of leadership is passing on the wisdom from those who have been successful to those who will be successful. Mentorships that are created in response to specific community needs and the mutual interests of the mentor and apprentice will benefit everyone.
$45,000.00
2012

Nzen'man' Child and Family Development Centre Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Okanagan College Foundation

Aboriginal Access and Service Project

This pilot project is a culturally relevant, proactive program of support for first year Aboriginal students enrolled in university-level courses. It is a multidimensional support system that seeks to maintain cultural integrity to enhance Aboriginal student success. The program aims to provide individualized support, recreate the family dynamic, and monitor student progress. It is based on existing research and best practice examples. Aboriginal students voluntarily register for the program. Once registered, they are engaged one-on-one in order to co-create a program of support tailored to their needs, otherwise known as an Achievement Plan. This allows the learner to take ownership of their learning. Support is monitored and provided in a holistic fashion ensuring that physical, intellectual, emotional, and spiritual supports are available as needed. Each student uses a Passport to Achievement to record their interactions as per their Achievement Plan. Upon completion, students will have their passport evaluated to ensure they are eligible for the completion bursary.
$40,400.00
2013

Pathways Serious Mental Illness Society

Building Capacity Family to Family

Family-to-Family connects, empowers, and liberates family members who have been traumatized by their situation, marginalized and isolated by the fear of stigma. People attending the course have often not told even their close relatives what is happening to their son, daughter, or spouse. Because the course is taught by volunteer family members with an ill relative, participants find themselves in a ‘safe place’ where they can open up and share their feelings. NSSS has delivered Family-to-Family since 2001, a 12-part structured education course covering all aspects of severe mental illness. It raises levels of confidence and provides a forum where families can talk openly. Although it’s not considered a support group as such, support and emotional anchoring are an integral part of the course, perhaps its most important elements. Family Educator Course: Once participants have completed the course, selected participants are invited to attend Family Educator course. Once completed, family teachers will teach 'Family-to-Family' as a two-person co-leadership team to the next round.
$48,231.00
2014

PeerNet BC

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development

Engaging British Columbians in shaping our collective climate legacy

This year, project staff met with 150+ organizations to better understand why & how these groups might wish to engage on climate policy. Several have become central allies. Clean Energy BC (power producers), Green Jobs BC (labour+NGOs), Climate Smart (businesses), the Bowen Group (high-emission industries + ENGOs), the Urban Development Institute (building developers), Union of BC Municipalities, Organizing for Change (ENGOs) and others have worked with us to highlight opportunities to advance climate policy collectively with their members. We are seeking funding for a 3-year Test Grant to strategically expand & deepen the participation of British Columbians in climate action. This will also allow us to respond to more requests from grassroots groups, First Nations and community leaders to provide analysis and assistance on development issues relevant to them. With climate policy windows officially open federally and provincially, groups can now advocate effectively (using a GHG emissions lens) on issues such as pipelines, tankers, fracking, LNG, etc. We will test & expand our engagement, by partnering with key allies across strategic sectors (e.g., buildings, industry, ENGOs, labour, local government, First Nations, grassroots groups and media) to engage their networks in shaping climate policy. This work will change “how we act”, “money, knowledge & people”, and “laws, policies & rules”, and in promoting a more engaged society, will inform our “values & beliefs".
$50,000.00
2016

PHS Community Services Society

Creating Bee Space

Our mandate is to enhance community through apiculture and to connect people & pollinators. We believe in the therapeutic value of beekeeping, its ability to connect all people to community, to nature and to themselves. We bring bees into marginalized urban communities and manage them side by side with community members through our mentorship program; we create green spaces and green opportunities for training, employment and education; we diversify our ecosystem by supporting pollinators and increase our food security by pollination of local food and production of local honey. The bee hive is the centre point of our programming, out from which a spectrum of opportunity radiates. The bees are an incredibly fertile substrate for meaningful connection, green skills training and access to nature. Our programming is socially innovative in its ability to reach out and connect to those considered hard-to-reach, welcoming and supporting individuals and their communities, building bridges of communication, de-stigmatizing bees and people and taking leadership in environmental stewardship. There is a wealth of opportunity in the city for bees and people of all kinds, and our project is helping our city to realize its potential and be a model for other cities. This project will grow our ability to offer meaningful programming that builds community capacity to support native pollinators & honey bees; extend our programming to new geographies & peoples; and embeds us in our community.
$50,000.00
2015

PLEA Community Services Society of BC

Sto:lo Nation KidStart

PLEA and Sto:lo Nation's Community Development Department have agreed to work together to implement the KidStart Mentoring Program for children and youth living in Sto:lo Nation's Traditional Territory. KidStart was developed by PLEA 27 years ago and has already been successfully replicated in Campbell River, Courtenay and Victoria. These programs serve Aboriginal youth from the communities served, but this is the first time the program will be implemented with a specifically Aboriginal focus. KidStart's goal is to provide each participant with the opportunity to develop a supportive relationship with a Volunteer Mentor who is a consistent and positive role model. Mentors plan weekly activities in the community that will provide participants with experiences that will foster a sense of personal achievement, reinforce their strengths, and create new interests. The program is fundamentally preventative, rooted in the belief and supported by research that early engagement with a mentor improves participants' capacity to overcome adversity and become more active in their communities.
$50,000.00
2013

posAbilities Association of British Columbia

Don't Sweat It: Promoting System Sustainability and Employment (Formerly titled Lady Bug Art Gardens) Year 2

$46,280.00
2011

Pride in Art Society

Drama Queer: Seducing Social Change

QAF’s mandate is the very definition of systemic intervention—interrupting basic routines, interrogating ingrained beliefs of truth & right/wrong. From Oscar Wilde to General Idea, queer artists have been the vanguard of civil rights; with social & aesthetic innovation inextricably entwined. Curated by renowned scholar Jonathan Katz—best known for co-curating Hide/Seek, the Smithsonian’s 1st ever openly LGBT exhibition—the exhibition Drama Queer: Seducing Social Change explores this legacy. Katz explains: Wildly diverging queer artists have shared credence in art’s ability to, if not produce social change, at least lubricate its prospects. Central to this generalized belief is the idea that queerness works a seduction away from naturalized, normative & thus invisible ideological creeds towards a position that is precisely other to, at a tangent from, social expectation. In deviating from social norms, queer art thus calls the viewer, of whatever sexualities, to an awareness of their own deviancy. Our artists seek to change beliefs by making the viewer accomplice, queering their perspective, to see from a dissident vantage point. A curator tour & hands-on workshop for street-involved youth, public discussion salon & panel invite debate, with active participation from our most disenfranchised. Katz’s importance entices eminent artists to exhibit openly as queers, promoting greater regard in the art world, increasing visibility & engaging individuals in complex inquiry.
$45,000.00
2016

Project Limelight Society

Project Limelight - Performing Arts Program

Recognizing a need for a creative outlet for youth living in Vancouver’s DTES, Project Limelight Society developed a free performing arts program, running four months long, twice a year. Participants are introduced to various theatre arts disciplines such as acting, creative writing, singing, mask, dance, stand-up comedy and improvisation. Participants spend 3 months rehearsing a full length production and then perform on a professional stage, giving them the opportunity to showcase everything they’ve accomplished. The last show was performed to two sold-out audiences of more than 600 people. Project Limelight Society provides food security and a safe place to build a community, which is particularly important for families who are also dealing with the additional challenges of addiction, poverty, discrimination or isolation. Providing this outlet for their children is very important to the families in our community, and it is reflected in the pride they experience, when they see their children perform.
$50,000.00
2013

Public Health Association of BC

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

PuSh International Performing Arts Festival Society

Vancouver 125th Anniversary Suite

To commemorate Vancouver’s 125th Anniversary, the PuSh Festival plans a suite of contemporary works involving local and foreign artists, commissions and adaptations of iconic works. The project will explore questions of identity, memory, urban politics and experience. It involves six separate works: City of Dreams, PodPlays, Complaint Choir, Portraits in Motion, Bonanza (Colorado) and Iqaluit. Collectively, these works are characterized by community engagement and collaboration, and will be presented in the 2011 PuSh Festival.
$40,000.00
2010

Qmunity BC's Queer Resource Centre Society

LGBTQ Community Building Project

It's true we have come a long way. Yet, LGBTQ youth are still at higher risk for bullying and suicide, seniors face re-closeting as they enter assisted-living facilities, and trans people continue to fight legal discrimination. QMUNITY believes that every human being deserves to feel a sense of belonging and to live a life free of hatred and violence. We believe in the power of community conversation to help achieve this goal. The purpose of this project is to facilitate a community dialogue that will: 1. Provide a platform for LGBTQ individuals and communities to address queer health issues, build social networks and increase connection. 2. Gather useful input to optimize the design of a new facility for all stakeholders 3. Identify key issues affecting LGBTQ communities to improve future services/programming across organizations The project will provide a structured process deliberately designed to provide a springboard where people can increase connectivity by working together, building social networks, and directly influencing the future of LGBTQ communities in BC.
$45,000.00
2014

QQS (EYES) Projects Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$40,000.00
2021

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Keeping BC's North Coast Oil Free

This project will enable Raincoast Conservation Foundation and Living Oceans Society to participate in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency review process. They want to research and identify the risks to ecosystems associated with Enbridge’s proposal to build a pipeline from the tar sands terminal in Alberta to the BC coast and transport this oil by tanker from Kitimat to offshore markets, which presents the likelihood of oil spills in some of world’s most ecologically valuable and unique ecosystems, including the globally renowned parks and waterways of the Great Bear Rainforest and Haida Gwaii.
$40,000.00
2010

Red Fox Healthy Living Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Richmond Addiction Services Society

Community Action Ambassadors

The Community Action Ambassadors will be seniors who will be trained, supported and connected to their community. They will offer peer counselling support, public education forums, workshops and will use the media to educate their community about the issues that are impacting seniors today. The outcomes will be to connect seniors across cultures to community services such as Senior’s Centres, recreation centres, their cultural community and to the mainstream community. Community contacts will increase, isolation will decrease and referrals and community service contacts will increase. Public policy will be impacted as motivated and educated seniors will be connecting with the system of care. Importantly, seniors dealing with new or chronic alcohol and drug use including medications, mental health and other health issues will know where to go and who to turn to regardless of their language of choice or cultural group. The Community Action Ambassadors will fill the large gap in services as they will outreach to the community enabling isolated seniors access to trained volunteers.
$41,000.00
2013

Richmond Family Place Society

Family Fun Cafe Project

The Family Fun Cafe project will provide free nutritious home cooked meals and healthy snacks to those families accessing the evening food banks. The project will deliver a family resource program focussing on family support, early learning and child development activities. The project will reach vulnerable and isolated families that do not typically access our universal family resource programs; in addition to this over time the project will facilitate a bridge for those families to more actively participate in mainstream family resource and early childhood development programs. By participating in this innovative project children will receive programming that is developmentally appropriate, enhance their learning, build their skills and confidence, increase their self-esteem and build strong supportive networks. Programs focus on learning through fun activities that are play based and provide opportunities for social and emotional development. The project will focus on providing parents with the necessary skills and resources to ensure their children reach their full potential.
$40,000.00
2013

Family Resource Outreach Project Phase Two

The Richmond Family Place Society delivers accessible, quality resource programs that respond to the needs of families with children ages 0 to 6 in the local community. Programs include parent and child drop-in, parent education, family support, resources and referrals. The project implements programs in neighbourhoods that lack preventive early childhood development programming. By reducing barriers of transportation and time costs, families that need the programs can receive them. Families benefit from an increased connectedness to other families and their community. Parents receive parenting support and children learn valuable skills.
$40,000.00
2010

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