Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

The Arts Club of Vancouver Theatre Company

Helen Lawrence, A Cinematic Stage Work

Helen Lawrence is an ambitious and innovative new work. World renowned visual artist Stan Douglas, award-wining screenwriter Chris Haddock (Da Vinci's Inquest) and internationally acclaimed stage and film director Kim Collier are co-creating what will be the crown jewel in the Arts Club's 50th season. Inspired by post-war Film Noir, Helen Lawrence intertwines theatre, visual art, live-action filming and computer-generated recreations of historical backgrounds for a groundbreaking multi-media showcase. With Canadian Stage and the Banff Centre as co-producers, we will develop and workshop the piece in 2013 and will premiere the new play in March 2014 at the Stanley Theatre. While Helen Lawrence represents our largest ever investment in a new play, we have undertaken this project as part of our 50th season because it serves our commitment to develop new work, it reveals an important part of our local history, it underscores our commitment to the evolution of the art form and because the collaboration of such an incredible artistic team must be supported.
$50,000.00
2013

The Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada

Leadership through the seasons

$50,000.00
2019

The Mustard Seed

The Capital Regional District Food Rescue

The CRD Food Rescue is about rescuing good, edible and healthy fresh food from heading to the landfill or laying on the farmer's field. Food Banks for the past 30 years have been alleviating food insecurity, but have not addressed the root causes of poverty causing individuals to access social supports. Moreover, non-perishables, which have been the staple of food banks, have created long-term health issues for vulnerable communities as they are high in sugar and sodium. Our project is about reclaiming fresh foods, diverting it from the landfill, gleaning it, then re-distributing it to local non-profit agencies not only to increase the health outcomes of their clients, but also to cut agency food budgets so as to increase spending on supportive or poverty elimination programs, specifically housing supports. Most importantly however, with such high expected volumes of food, we will create a social enterprise where low-income earners who do not access food banks, but are food insecure due to economic barriers, may access this project through extremely subsidized cost. This would not be the sale of the food so as not to cut into the market share of retailers, but for the service of distribution including online component and operations costs. This piece would be linked to income levels to ensure a different customer base than our retail partners. We project generating 30% of our operations cost in the form of revenue within the first 3 years and 50% within 5 years.
$50,000.00
2015

The Only Animal Theatre Society

SLIME

SLIME is a world premiere of a play by Bryony Lavery about the impact of climate change on ‘the great animal orchestra' from which we have become disconnected by our infatuation with the sound of our own voices. The play is set in a fictional conference on marine extinction. Audience are welcomed as conference delegates and seated among animals. You hear a dolphin at your elbow or a sea bird on your shoulder: animals too have something to say. We come together to face an absolute threat to life on earth—an insatiable creature taking over seas called SLIME. Like other forces in our 21st century lives, facebookslime or googleslime, SLIME moves with viral force, gobbling up all available resources. We must learn a new way to survive. This conference is the last hope for salvation. SLIME is an immersive event, where audiences are decision-makers with the world at stake. It requires us to tune into our animal sensibility and operate within natural systems instead of as super-predators. SLIME requires of its audience a new kind of listening - listening to our indivisible relationship with the biosphere. As we return from the world of the play to our lives, SLIME asks that we confront our connection to all inhabitants of the earth. The Only Animal's process of creation extends each show into a year of curated programming to more deeply affect audiences and issues. This year of SLIME also engages the ensemble in seeding future work creating legacy and impact in the community.
$50,000.00
2017

Tinkers

Known for ambitious theatre set anywhere from swimming pools to igloos, The Only Animal now takes us deep into the wilderness. Tinkers is a large-scale, site-specific theatre show set off-grid in a threatened old-growth forest. We were drawn to the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Paul Harding, because of the transcendentalism: it proposes that Human = Nature = Divine. This is the heart of the piece--a deeply hopeful message in our times. As activists trying to protect a local old-growth forest, we saw the opportunity to create a sited performance piece with a conservationist agenda. Working with both professional artists of the highest caliber (including international art superstar, Cornelia Konrads) and up to 30 local community makers/performers, and an activated audience, our goal is to nurture a deep, creative relationship to place. The story centers on an epileptic peddler, estranged from his wife, distant from his children, but in an ever-ecstatic relationship with the natural world. Our version of Tinkers asks: How can we embrace the wilderness within ourselves? With a surreal set that integrates with the growing forest and choral music based on local birdsong we nurture in our team and audience a new connection with their nature. For 10 months, we host a weekly events combining theatrical elements of the show and solutionary activism. Summer 2016 we rehearse and premiere the piece as the first professional theatre show created in/for the rural Sunshine Coast.
$49,000.00
2015

The Polygon Gallery

Speaking Pictures (Photographs and Oral Histories)

Arts and culture institutions have historically separated photographic representations and oral accounts of events, while prioritizing the validity of the photograph qua historical record, resulting in the exclusion of oral accounts in the presentation of culture and history. The Polygon Gallery’s Speaking Pictures project will facilitate a change in this largely unexamined dichotomy. It will include an exhibition of historical photographs of Vancouver’s North Shore, combined with oral histories relating to the photographs. Through witnessing this presentation, audiences will broaden their expectations, and the presence of multiple sources for a story should come to be expected.
$44,000.00
2018

The Starfish Environmental Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Theatre Conspiracy

Victim Impact

Victim Impact examines the Samji Ponzi scheme involving $110 million & over 200 victims – mainly the elderly in Surrey’s South Asian community.  Over two years, the project will fuse investigative journalism, community engagement, media and inter-disciplinary theatre. With direct community engagement in the creation, the project is a catalyst for education and outreach.. Engagement consist of: Research: Ongoing process attending court trials/hearings; interviewing victims & key players including lawyers, regulators, psychologists and victim support groups; sourcing/ analyzing of documents (transcripts; judgments; media, legal & accounting reports); research into financial law and practices.   Creation: October 2017 workshop - two weeks with artists of diverse practices, staged reading with community feedback session.   Podcasts: Five 35-45 min. episodes of interviews and dramatizations: Through the Samji case examine the causes of fraud; educate & provide context to recognize fraud; destigmatize victims; facilitate support networks; encourage participation in future episodes, workshops and theatre attendance.   Performance/ Events: Workshop Production Performance (PTC, 2017) and The Cultch Premiere Performance (Spring, 2018) will include community activities such as: Open rehearsals, post-show talks, a facilitated public forum by experts on financial law; facilitating dialogues with victim services; address the social stigma & its effects on families/ communities.
$40,000.00
2017

Tides Canada Initiatives

Inner Activist - Engagement and Building capacity with diverse young adults

The Inner Activist (IA) completed a comprehensive research project in 2006-2010 that acted as the foundation for the IA project, and the development of our course curriculum to date. The premise was to address and support the connection between our own individual development, intentions, and our external impacts and actions for change in the world, also taking into consideration systemic issues and oppression. However, the IA has recognized that it needs to do more in order to be reflective of more diverse populations, and be more responsive to the complex issues the world is facing. This comes with a strong commitment to diversify the IA spaces of decision making, together with strengthening the offerings through courses, workshops and events that build leadership with more diverse populations, in particular, young adults, racialized immigrant youth and indigenous communities. The IA is seeking support through this grant to increase job security for the Engagement and Events Manager, who is a young Muslim woman, and increase the resources offered to help young adults become coaches at the IA courses, in order to build their capacity through mentorship and community engagement with the hope of them eventually expanding their role with IA.
$44,444.00
2018

Reconciliation Canada - New Way Forward

Reconciliation Canada is engaging Canadians through experiential transformative change processes delivered by the following: Reconciliation Dialogue Workshops & Action Plans are targeted at youth, community and organizational leaders, these workshops provide the opportunity for participants to engage in meaningful dialogue, build relationships and develop reconciliation action plans. Leadership Training & Core Competencies Assessment - Targeted to existing and emerging youth, community and organization leaders to develop reconciliation values-based leadership skills. In conjunction Reconciliation Canada will assist organizations with assessments of core reconciliation competencies and development of roadmaps to guide reconciliation initiatives. Sustainable Economic Reconciliation Dialogue & Action Plans - Workshops focused on economic reconciliation bring together stakeholders for creative dialogue to build meaningful partnerships and the co-development of Sustainable Economic Reconciliation Action Plans. Workshops and leadership training includes a youth specific stream.
$50,000.00
2014

Protecting Fish Habitat and Freshwater in the Upper Fraser Basin

This project will further the work between the First Nations of the Yinka Dene Alliance (YDA) and Dr. Jack Stanford, a Professor of Ecology at the University of Montana specializing in river and freshwater ecology. It will combine Dr. Stanford’s impact assessment of the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline on the Sutherland, Stuart, and Salmon Rivers within the YDA traditional territories with the traditional ecological knowledge holders of the YDA First Nations. The final results will inform the YDA traditional decision-making process.
$40,000.00
2011

Tsow-Tun Le Lum Society

Creating Culturally Safe Workplaces for Indigenous Workers in the Social Care Sector

Over 52% of the children in youth in MCFD care are Aboriginal yet only 5% of MCFD’s 4200 staff are of Aboriginal heritage. Similar disparities exist in community agencies. However, research suggests that life outcomes are improved when Aboriginal children and families are served by staff who share cultural knowledge and experience, and who integrate cultural perspectives and teachings into their practice and care. This project will assist MCFD and community-based child, youth and family-serving agencies to address significant human resources and organizational issues that are compromising the capacity to deliver effective services and care to Aboriginal children, youth and families, i.e. recruitment, retention and practice challenges that are amplified within culturally unsafe workplaces. Specifically, the proposed project will complement cultural agility work that is currently underway in MCFD and through FCSSBC's Leadership 2020 initiative to: 1. Engage Aboriginal staff within MCFD and community agencies to better understand current state, key recruitment and retention factors and qualities of culturally safe workplaces 2. Convene staff, organizational, community and thought leaders in an 'innovation lab' to co-design an Aboriginal Organizational Development strategy and practices to enhance cultural safety 3. Share stories, emerging knowledge and practices to inspire organizations to address barriers and build cultural safety for clients/staff
$50,000.00
2016

Turning Point Ensemble

Ahakista-Air India Flight 182

Turning Point Ensemble is a co-producer of Ahakista – Air India Flight 182, a new opera commissioned by the Banff Centre for the Arts, Cork Midsummer Festival (Ireland), and the PuSh International Performing Arts Festival. As the story of Air India Flight 182 begins in Vancouver, stops in Toronto, and tragically explodes over Ireland, this opera weaves together local, national and global threads to tell a human story of our time.
$50,000.00
2010

U'Mista Cultural Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

UBC - Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Building Resiliency: Growing Food and Farmers

Four-Season Food Literacy: Hands-On Training for Farmers & Eaters (FSFL) will provide season extension education & training for aspiring & established farmers, gardeners, urban farmers and the general public. By modeling 4 methods of protected agriculture (hoophouses, high & low tunnels, and cold frames) we will provide the basis for hands-on workshops on season extension for all growers. The curriculum of our Practicum in Sustainable Agriculture (PSA) will be diversified to include season extension practices and we will expand the physical space used for farmer training. The increased scope of the PSA will help us provide aspiring agriculturalists with high-quality, hands-on, experiential training in ecologically based growing methods that will prepare them to meet today’s farming challenges. We willl present workshops to the general public that will equip Vancouverites with the necessary skills to eat locally year-round. FSFL has the overarching goal of creating a more food & farming literate population that can grow & eat more food year-round, increasing local food system resiliency.
$40,000.00
2012

UBC - Learning Exchange

Contributing through Computers Pilot Project

The goal of this project is to raise the overall digital literacy in Vancouver’s DTES and surrounding neighbourhoods, while building confidence and a range of skills in facilitators. The Learning Exchange will train and support 80 local residents to take a leadership role in the community by delivering free computer classes to people with little or no computer skills. By creating opportunities for facilitators to lead workshops, the project will ensure people have the IT skills increasingly needed to function in our technology-dependent world.
$50,000.00
2010

UBC - Office of Research Services

The Youth Injection Prevention YIP Project (Dr. Jane Buxton)

This project will disseminate the results of ten focus groups (FGs) and fifteen interviews with 60 street-involved youth aged 15-24 years in Metro Vancouver region, Nov 2009-March 2010. The FGs/interviews explored resiliency factors from the youth’s perspective, services available to reduce harms from drug use and perceived barriers to accessing these services. A team of 6 youth participated as co-researchers providing input into script design, co-facilitating FGs, performing data analysis and presenting at National conferences and local partnership meetings. These youth will continue to be involved in this project 1) Conduct 5 interactive community workshops (one in each health authority) to present the findings of the previous study to the local youth. These workshops will be led by one member of the YIP youth team, a research coordinator and a local youth from the respective health authority. 2) Feedback from youth participants at the workshops will be used to compare/contrast issues and experiences of local youth in their communities with those identified by Metro-Vancouver youth. 3) Create a DVD showing the process of youth engagement and empowerment. 4) Create a website, on-line forum and face book. 5) Produce a community friendly summary report and fact sheet re findings in Metro Vancouver and similarities and differences in other regions. The report will also be individualized for each community we visit so they can obtain some information specific to their needs.
$42,820.00
2010

UBC - Okanagan

Palliative Care without Borders: Trail/Castlegar Augmented Response (TCARE) Project

Dying, when complicated by uncontrolled symptoms and without the benefit of specialized palliative resources, is traumatic for all involved and leaves a collective community memory. Local community members and care providers in the regions of Trail and Castlegar have identified a critical need for a community-based team approach to respond to the significant challenges that exist in providing high quality, cohesive rural palliative care. UBC Okanagan School of Nursing faculty member, and Canada Research Chair, Dr. Barb Pesut, along with community health nurse, bereavement counselor, and Trail Hospice Society board member Brenda Hooper, are currently engaged in building connections with local health and palliative care professionals and volunteers so as to provide an integrating link for patients and families to community resources. This multi-sector team will work to create a sustainable model of care that will provide coordinated and accessible end-of-life support, impacting the quality of care, and ultimately the quality of life, for dying individuals and their families.
$50,000.00
2012

Aboriginal Mentorship Program

Some Aboriginal students face challenges when returning to their communities. Both communities and students often feel that students’ new skills and knowledge were not developed through an indigenous lens. This project identifies and mitigates breakdown points, and helps students share what they’ve learned with their community. Using a structured, three-month mentorship model, students develop, deliver, manage and evaluate a community development program while building relationships with their community.
$50,000.00
2010

Unique Get Together Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$40,000.00
2021

United Way of Northern British Columbia

Northern Rockies Social Planning Council (NRSPC)

This project will pay for a coordinator to facilitate and sustain the activities needed to achieve its mission and vision, and to examine the social impact from present and future growth resulting from the Horn River Basin and Cordova shale gas discoveries. The project will facilitate strategic planning and establish a model to identify critical and emerging issues; facilitate inception of the Fort Nelson branch of the Northeast Community Foundation; research funding opportunities and facilitate meetings and disseminate information to the public.
$40,000.00
2010

University of British Columbia Department of Pediatrics

Youth ON TRAC: A Health Advocacy Voice for youth with chronic health conditions

Youth aging out of pediatric care report feeling abandoned and helpless in the adult health care system. ON TRAC, a collaborative initiative involving UBC, Child Health BC, BCMA, BC Children’s Hospital and health regions, aims to improve health transition for B.C. youth. Key to success is genuine community-based youth engagement and an active and empowered youth voice. Healthy outcomes for youth will be actualized when youth are involved, active participants in their health care. Youth ON TRAC will directly engage youth with chronic health conditions/disabilities (CHC/Ds) in all processes to create a new, relevant, meaningful, effective, authentic youth health advocacy voice through skills-building training to 1)co-create a needs assessment; 2)develop a youth-led “transition workshop template” and hold workshops; 3)develop online social mentorship; 4)provide education for youth/families; 5)inform health care decision makers on youth-friendly health care transition. Creation of a Provincial Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) within Patient Voices Network (PVN) will ensure sustainability.
$50,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

"Amlilas": Toward a 'Namgis Community-Driven Curriculum for Early Childhood Development'

This project addresses an identified priority of the 'Namgis First Nations people living in Alert Bay, British Columbia - to enhance the cultural relevance of early childhood education (ECE) so that children are entrenched in their language and cultural practices from their earliest days. Amlilas is the community's existing early childhood program. Through a community-based participatory process, we will build on the existing strengths of this program to support a more culturally relevant curriculum - creating a place where young 'Namgis children learn within their cultural traditions and language. Drawing on existing indicators of early childhood development and data generated in this project, we will propose curricular strategies reflecting unique dimensions of ECD within this community. The knowledge generated in this project will enhance the cultural relevance of ECD for 'Namgis First Nation children and contribute to knowledge informing ECD curricular planning and implementation within First Nations communities in British Columbia.
$40,000.00
2013

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Indigenous Child Well-being Training Initiative

UVic has developed an Indigenous Child Well-being Research Network and has piloted training for Indigenous communities on child well-being best practices for the last 2 years. Each training session is developed in advance with community input. The training supports the Indigenous knowledge inherent in the community engaging Elders, adults and youth to learn about positive Indigenous child well-being best practices in order to inform public policy at all levels. They want to know how the current system works and how they can become more independent eg. through Granny Clubs, youth mentorship groups, etc., in order to protect and keep their children in their own communities. The training facilitates knowledge mobilization and the adaptation of promising practices to local contexts. Cultural metaphors such as basket weaving, dip nets or disappearing oolichan fish are used to provide an appropriate cultural context grounded in respect, relevance, reciprocity and responsibility.
$50,000.00
2012

Upper Skeena Development Centre Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$44,000.00
2021

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