Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Environmental Youth Alliance

Developing a Leadership Continuum for Indigenous and Immigrant Youth

$50,000.00
2019

Farm Folk City Folk Society

New City Market Phase III: PEOPLE, PLACE, PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

Vancouver Farmers Markets is a leading partner in the development of a local food hub for the City of Vancouver. With construction anticipated to start in 2014-15, the New City Market (NCM) will provide a significant public asset for generations of Vancouverites and BC farmers, featuring a year-round farmers market, supply aggregation & distribution support and commercial micro-processing kitchen. NCM will increase long-term capacity and revenues for local small and medium scale rural and urban growers and value-added micro-processors, and will increase access to these local products by Vancouver food buyers such as institutions, community groups, chefs, small retailers and the general public. As a result, NCM will provide environmental benefits, local economic development, increased training, skills development and employment opportunities, and increased public awareness about locally-produced foods and BC agriculture for generations to come. A site has been identified and a final governance model and business plan is anticipated for fall, 2012. Project details: newcitymarket.org.
$55,000.00
2012

Fraser Region Aboriginal Friendship Centre Association

Surrey Indigenous Youth Advisory Council

$50,000.00
2019

Young Warriors Indigenous Youth Leading Change

Building on the relationships established, and needs identified in Phase One of the FCGrant, FRAFCA will develop an innovative program that would offer youth in, and from foster care a chance to represent themselves in the City of Surrey’s planning and decision-making process. We will complete this task by: 1) Creating a safe youth-only space to provide resources and meet on a regular basis; 2) develop an Indigenous Youth Leadership Training model and train two youth facilitators using the Indigenize Curriculum and addresses the 6 domains as well as their unique barriers to post care services. 3) establishing the Surrey Indigenous Youth Planning Table with key stakeholders. 4) Hold a Youth Honouring Event in partnership with Kwantlen First Nation that would invite the public to learn more about the experiences of Indigenous youth aging out of care; 5)prepare a gap analysis report and briefing note for the City of Surrey Council meeting in the fall. This year in the City of Surrey 56 Indigenous youth will age out of foster care. Surrey is home to 12000 aboriginal people. The median population age is 25.2 years old, which means it’s a young population with 50 percent under the age of 25. In our Phase One project, titled the Rites of Passage Project a major need identified was for appropriate and safe housing for youth aging out of care in Surrey. 50% of our participants were homeless at one point during our last project.
$50,000.00
2016

Georgia Strait Alliance

Building community strength and resilience to oil spills in vulnerable coastal areas

This project represents a social innovation that can be executed within a medium-term timeframe and contributes to an over-arching societal shift - away from a belief system that accepts as inevitable our dependence on fossil fuels and towards a system which acknowledges the inherent risks in this dependence and works toward a clean energy future. In a time of growing concerns about global climate change and with our increasing recognition of the local impacts of oil spills, this project works from the ground up to change how communities prepare for and invest in local oil spill response and stand together to voice their opposition to projects like Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. Kinder Morgan’s proposal would greatly increase the risk of a spill that would devastate local communities and ecosystems and significantly contribute to climate change. By working with local governments and individuals to identify and address gaps in local oil spill preparedness and response, the project will address the imbalance of resources, power and knowledge that currently prevents local governments from adequately planning for oil spills. This will increase the ability of vulnerable communities, and the people who will be most directly affected by a spill, to have a voice in creating a strengthened spill response regime which will protect and restore their local natural habitats and ecosystems and foster community resilience.
$54,000.00
2015

Gitanmaax Band Council

Youth on Water (YOW!)

The mandate of the Youth on Water! (YOW!) is to educate, empower and engage youth, with a focus on youth at risk, from communities of the Skeena Watershed. We do this by conservation education, job skills training and healthy physical activity during five-day rafting programs on local rivers with certified guides. There are three main goals of the YOW! Program: i) provide a dependable, safe and supportive recreational opportunity with a strong leadership component for Hazelton area youth who are considered at risk and/or marginalized within their family or social situations, ii) provide critical support in the development of the region's future stewards and conservation leaders across geographic and ethnic communities, and iii) educate local youth with regard to the character, location, ecology and diversity of their local river ecosystems. The positive that we have seen in young people attending YOW! has a positive effect on their families and the wider community, including aspects of school life. YOW! was developed by SWCC as a pilot program in Hazelton in 2009.
$60,000.00
2013

Golden Community Resources Society

Golden Youth Engagement Project

The Golden Youth Engagement project is a collaborative youth-lead project that enhances opportunities for youth and strengthens the links between youth and the community. This project aims to empower youth to be leaders in our community and enhance civic engagement opportunities for youth. The Golden Youth Engagement project will operate out of the newly created Golden Youth Centre. The Youth Center will create formal and informal engagement opportunities between the community and youth and serve as a bridge between youth and the community. Key community organizations have committed to providing in-kind staff support to engage with youth out of the Youth Centre by committing to working or volunteering at of the Youth Centre one evening per month as well as co-facilitating workshops and activities with youth and youth centre staff.
$50,000.00
2012

Greater Vancouver Professional Theatre Alliance Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Haida Gwaii Museum Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Hope in Shadows Inc.

Learning about illicit alcohol harm reduction options in BC

This project will train and take facilitators (themselves drinkers of non-beverage alcohol) to 10 communities outside the Greater Vancouver area to research how people who drink illicit alcohol see and experience the harms associated with their alcohol consumption and what they think the solutions to address these harms might be. They will share findings with decision-makers and work to see their recommendations implemented.
$51,980.00
2011

Inclusion BC Society

Phase 2 Opening Doors to Work 2

Phase 2 Opening Doors to Work 2
$50,000.00
2010

Jewish Community Centre of Greater Vancouver

Bagel Club Catering Social Enterprise Year 3

The Bagel Club Catering Social Enterprise project is a catering business that specializes in Vegetarian Mediterranean Cuisine. This service offers high quality food while training and employing adults with special needs. Participants learn all the elements of how to work and operate a catering business. These include meal preparations, food safety, and customer service. Participants are paid an hourly rate for their service. This is led by Bagel Club Catering trained staff, assisted by outside professionals such as chefs, nutritionists, and business people. Participants are trained and employed with Bagel Club Catering with the goal of part time employment. This project meets the growing need of training and employment opportunities for able special needs adults. Our persons served want to contribute to their community and society. It heightens their self worth and allows them to increase their income and lessen reliance on government funds. In addition, we see that in the past year there is a great need for this business in the community.
$50,000.00
2012

Bagel Club Catering Social Enterprise

The Bagel Club Catering Social Enterprise project is a catering business that specializes in Vegetarian Mediterranean Cuisine. This service offers high quality food while training and employing adults with special needs. Participants learn all the elements of how to work and operate a catering business. These include meal preparations, food safety, and customer service. Participants are paid an hourly rate for their service. This is led by Bagel Club Catering trained staff, assisted by outside professionals such as chefs, nutritionists, and business people. Participants are trained and employed with Bagel Club Catering with the goal of part time employment. This project meets the growing need of training and employment opportunities for able special needs adults. Our persons served want to contribute to their community and society. It heightens their self worth and allows them to increase their income and lessen reliance on government funds. In addition, we see that in the past year there is a great need for this business in the community.
$50,000.00
2011

John Howard Society of Victoria

Feeding Ourselves and Others Therapeutic Community Garden Project

After being approached by members of the community last year, our society began a new type of project – a therapeutic community garden designed with and for some of our most isolated and vulnerable citizens. They included people suffering from mental illnesses, addiction issues and others with a history of homelessness, many of whom were heavy users of police and emergency services and/or were offenders at risk of re-offending. Our organization was chosen because of its extensive experience working with many of these people. With support from VIHA’s innovative ACT (Assertive Community Treatment) and VIC Outreach Teams, together with members of the Victoria Integrated Court (VIC) subcommittee, we piloted a very successful community garden at Seven Oaks Care Facility. It involved 16 participants together with community volunteers and VIHA support staff. Having proven that this model works, we now are working to establish a larger, permanent and sustainable therapeutic and income generating community garden that will serve as a model for others to learn from and emulate.
$51,700.00
2013

Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies-JUMP

Increase math achievement among students in Aboriginal communities

In response to teachers' and community leaders' requests for curriculum and training, JUMP Math (JUMP) will undertake a two-year pilot project to implement its programs in 7 schools in Nisgaâ, Terrace, Kitwanga and Kitkatla communities, to: - Increase program dissemination to reach 930 students each year. - Increase math achievement among all students, even as we eliminate the gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students. - Increase math teaching skills of over 50 teachers in Aboriginal communities over the next 2 years. - Eliminate math anxiety among teachers and students. - Demonstrate efficacy of the program through evidence-based evaluation. JUMP will undertake to: - Provide training and ongoing support to teachers working in communities and schools with predominantly Aboriginal students. - Provide teacher handbooks, student workbooks and related materials. - Measure the efficacy of these programs. JUMP programs will be evaluated by UBC Professor, Linda Siegel. We expect this research to stimulate greater community and philanthropic support for expansion of these programs.
$60,000.00
2011

Justice For Girls

Indigenous Young Women and Teenage Girls Recruitment and Hiring

$50,000.00
2019

JustWork Economic Initiative

Social Enterprise Support Years 2 & 3

Our mission is to foster employment for individuals facing major barriers to work, particularly those with mental and physical disabilities. We do this through the social enterprises we support which provide (a) sustained, dignified, and meaningful employment for our participants and (b) a way for consumers to support social values through their purchases. Social enterprises have gained recognition as excellent tools for providing employment to individuals facing barriers to work, including those with disabilities. Through our own social enterprise work since 2006, we too have had success: 30 individuals facing major barriers had employment in 2010, 28 of these faced a disability, 17 of those 28 have been employed for more than one year, and 11 have been employed for more than two years.
$55,000.00
2012

Social Enterprise Development and Support

Our mission is to foster employment for individuals facing major barriers to work, particularly those with mental and physical disabilities. We do this through the social enterprises we support which provide (a) sustained, dignified, and meaningful employment for our participants and (b) a way for consumers to support social values through their purchases. Social enterprises have gained recognition as excellent toold for providing employment to individuals facing barriers to work, including those with disabilities. Through our own social enterprise work since 2006, we too have had success: 30 individuals facing major barriers had employment in 2010, 28 of these faced a disability, 17 of those 28 have been employed for more than one year, and 11 have been employed for more than two years.
$50,000.00
2011

Kinsight Community Society

Kudoz: From Prototype to Scale

One's possibilities are limited to one's experiences, and for persons with intellectual disabilities (PWD), there is often a significant a poverty of experiences. Too many are repeating the same daily routines, and recycling the same conversations with the same people. They are not flourishing in our professional systems nor in our communities. Kudoz is an experience catalogue that bridges PWD with community members around shared passions--from song-writing to animation. The platform is based on evidence-based theory and design-thinking, and is built to address the determinants that lead to outcomes around quality of life, social connection, employment, and the reduction of social stigma.
$50,000.00
2017

Knowledge Network Corporation

Working People: The Unknown History of British Columbia

Knowledge Network proposes to commission, produce and broadcast a series of three original half-hour documentaries, each made up of ten 2-3 minute short films, telling the stories of ordinary people who played extraordinary roles in the evolution of our province. Working People: The Unknown History of British Columbia will reach upwards of two million people in BC through television and the internet. Through this unique partnership opportunity with the Vancouver Foundation, our project will challenge filmmakers, engage viewers and create a lasting legacy.
$60,000.00
2011

Learning Buddies Network of the Lower Mainland Society

Learning Buddies Network tutoring (LBN)

Dr. A. Lipson, a pediatrician conceived of LBN in 2008. She observed a population of disadvantaged struggling grade 1-4 learners whose self esteem was faltering related to low school achievement. These children could access high quality medical care and pediatric assessment, yet their family circumstances did not allow access to simple one-on-one learning support and mentoring. She saw an unmet need for support for these children who typically have social and/or educational disadvantages. The idea of LBN was to pair secondary school or UBC students seeking meaningful volunteer experiences with these children. We provide one-on-one trained tutoring weekly in their schools in group sessions, focussing on academics, games, providing mentoring and instilling confidence. The children of interest attend inner city schools and may be disadvantaged economically and/or socially. LBN has grown and developed our own resources, and now provides reading and math volunteer tutoring in 15 programmes in Vancouver, Richmond and Burnaby.
$60,000.00
2013

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

Burnaby Youth Hub Support Project

The Burnaby Youth Hub opened in 2010 to give vulnerable youth easier access to educational, health and therapeutic services. A range of services previously scattered throughout Burnaby are now offered in one warm and welcoming location. Your support would help maintain the position of a Coordinator to facilitate this one-stop shop of services. Services are offered by individual agencies and organizations that collaborate to customize support for youth with multiple needs. These youth are not connected to the community and the Hub offers them opportunities for better life chances, greater economic independence and ensures they are living out of harms way. Services include an educational program, clinic, youth centre, counselling and job readiness and skills training and other services. Government, non-profit and community agencies work together to help each youth reach their potential. The Coordinator supports youth, service providers and staff, provides oversight of the network of agencies at the Hub, attends to physical plant issues and promotes the Hub to the community.
$60,000.00
2012

Makeway Charitable Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Mascall Dance Society

Put The Kettle On

Put the Kettle On (PKO) is a youth-led dance community event that provides marginalized youth access to creation, production and management. The PKO artistic team will partner with community service agencies in Port Hardy and inner-city Vancouver. PKO disrupts basic routine (how we act and what we do), providing structured workshops that offer a foundation in dance and rhythmic movement, a physical outlet for self-expression and a shared dance experience that creates a sense of community/culture. Further, PKO disrupts resource flow (money, knowledge, people) to provide youths unique access to artistic expression. Participants will learn to create, produce and manage a community dance event from start to finish. In recognition of the time and commitment of involved youth, PKO will pay honoraria. Shoes and socks are supplied. Meals will be provided at workshops for the duration of the project. A sense of authentic achievement comes from making art with others and bringing it to life in event form. From a healthy creative outlet for self-expression, a toolkit of practical and emotional skills, and a connection with others comes empowerment. It is likely that with this experience, participants will go on to engage in artistic production in future.
$57,447.00
2016

Matsqui-Abbotsford Impact Society

Indigenous Co-Executive Directors (ICED)

$50,000.00
2019

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