Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Matsqui-Abbotsford Impact Society

Who We Are, What We Are, Why We Are (WWA3)

WWA3 develops from the words of Sq’éwlets elder Reg Phillips: "The past can either imprison us, or set us free. That is our choice. And so, link that with the tremendous culture and customs and traditions that we have as Xwelmexw people. All of the sacred things that the native people do or live through—like culture is a way of living. And I think just beginning to understand who we are and what we are and why we are. And I believe that last one… why we are, what are we really here on this earth, at this time, for—I really believe it has to do with a lot of healing." (digitalsqewlets.ca) This project allows us to support a staff person to continue to span the Fraser-Salish region—collecting the aspirations communities have for their youth (especially youth in care), and helping them come together to realize these aspirations. This position (2014-2016 VYPER, 2016-2018 YEP) has been widely embraced and utilized to support the sharing of power with young people so they can have a consistent and growing role in community-developed projects and develop their own projects—their own ways of defining who, what and why they are—constructing their own healing, identity & freedom—to steward the land, themselves, and the future 7 generations. The project has been developing along 5 streams: 1) Youth co-facilitated interactive workshops, 2) Youth-led, adult-supported regional conferences, 3) Local youth and elder events, 4) Youth advisory/action groups, 5) Knowledge exchange activities.
$50,000.00
2017

Minerva Foundation for BC Women

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Moccasin Footprint Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Multi-Lingual Orientation Service Association for Immigrant Communities

Can You Dig It: Immigrants and Refugees Engagement Project

Can You Dig It helps immigrants and refugees break down isolation by building a community garden on East 8th Avenue at Commercial Drive. The project will facilitate connections between immigrants and local community people, with the goal of social and economic integration. Over two years, this project will sponsor gardening training sessions; recruit newcomer volunteers to meet with neighbours and invite them to participate; and invite 240 newcomer families to establish and maintain a produce garden at their homes.
$50,000.00
2010

Museum of Vancouver

LEVEL BIPOC Grants 2021

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Nanaimo Association for Community Living

COCO's Catering Project

The purpose of COCO's Catering Project is to help fulfill the cafe's mission. Catering will allow us to provide increased employment hours and expand the diversity of work experience for our staff with developmental disabilities. Catering has been identified as critical to helping the cafe achieve financial sustainability. It is anticipated that catering would also bring additional marketing and advertising benefits to the cafe, which would be incredibly beneficial for our small social enterprise. The project involves renovating the kitchen area, to offer more space that is suitably designed and equipped for preparing catering orders. This would greatly benefit our staff with developmental disabilities who can find working in confined spaces difficult and who also frequently suffer with back issues along with other mobility challenges. This renovation would allow us to undertake catering and at the same time better accommodate our staff with developmental disabilities by providing a bigger and more effectively designed workspace.
$50,000.00
2013

NACLWorks! "Employment First" Bridging Project

Nanaimo Association for Community Living supports and advocates for citizens with developmental disabilities and the people who care for them by promoting inclusion through various residential and community opportunities, activities, and services. NACL would like to continue its development by expanding its successful employment service, and requires financial assistance in bridging the gap between now and when our next day program employee is due to retire. This assistance will allow us to meet the employment needs of an additional five to seven job seekers without negatively impacting our staff or participants in our day program. Our intention is to continue our gradual transition to a more diversified model of service delivery. This transition time is an opportunity for people who want to work to have the means to access support, in order to reach their employment goals.
$60,000.00
2011

Nanaimo Child Development Centre Society

Creating Systemic Change for Physically Disabled Youth in Need of Mental Health Services

Navigation programs are an important short term strategy to help families make their way through a complex & often segregated array of mental health services. They are also a path to direct action to resolve barriers to care, achieving systemic reform. Having recently received a grant & some Board funding to test such a program, the NCDC will assess the extent to which it can influence the latter. At a systems level, by liaising with families with lived experience, mental health support groups & clinicians, adjunct care agencies & funding bodies, the navigator will “map the system” resulting in the identification of the common challenges & service gaps facing families & highlight promising practices & potential opportunities for systemic change. At a clinical level, clients are initially triaged by a NCDC Zone Team. If a Team cannot manage a client's needs, the navigator will enlist support from the broader community, promoting agency collaboration & integration of mental health services. At an individual level, families engaged in program development will, with peer support, begin to advocate for change. Work at all levels will, we believe, change the way we interact with clients, provider groups & funders; identify pressure points & force a reallocation of resources internally & externally; inform public policy. It expects us to be innovative, to rethink the current landscape & acknowledge that systemic change requires patience, persistence, & commitment.
$50,000.00
2016

Native Courtworker & Counselling Association of B.C.

Building Consensus Towards a Better Outcomes Strategy for Aboriginal Children

The newly-formed Aboriginal Justice Council, a collaborative partnership between three major First Nations change agents in BC, aims to facilitate social inclusion for Aboriginal children who are impacted by ongoing exclusion, stigmatization, and trauma as a result of their involvement in the child protection and justice systems. The Aboriginal Justice Council will work with government agencies as equals to identify issues in existing mechanisms, policies, procedures, and processes and develop consensus on a better justice outcomes strategy to reduce the numbers of Aboriginal children removed from families and communities and placed into foster care and jails, and to increase their belonging and inclusion. This project will disrupt the existing system by creating a new highly credible and trusted key player that cannot be ignored or merely accommodated but whose recommendations must be adhered to. This requires frank dialogue on years of disinvestment and disempowerment resulting from colonial governance and practice and the profound lack of interest, sense of accountability, and empathy concerning the legacy of adverse results for Aboriginal people. The council will focus its attention, as mandated by the people, on creating meaningful change in existing systems that will facilitate social inclusion for all Aboriginal children in BC who are part of the overrepresentation in or vulnerable to becoming part of the justice and child protection systems, and their families.
$59,830.00
2016

Nawican Advancement Society o/a Nawican Friendship Centre

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Neil Squire Society

Employ-Ability in West Kelowna

The Neil Squire Society will partner with First College in West Kelowna, to deliver our Employ-Ability program. It is a twelve week program for people with physical disabilities, and will be delivered online and supported with a local facilitator. The core modules of Employ-Ability are Career Development, and Wellness for Work. Graduates of the Employ-Ability program have an action plan for better health, a plan to enter the labour market, and a clear career goal. The financial support of the Vancouver Foundation will support the staffing costs and the rent for the classroom space to deliver the program. Over two years, this project will: - Launch the Employ-Ability program at First College; - Market the program to local service providers, agencies, people with disabilities and other local stakeholders; - Serve 40 people with disabilities over two years; - Assist at least 20 people to move onto employment or further education; - Establish a local Disability Services Committee to sustain programming based on community needs.
$56,000.00
2014

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Social Credit Lending System For Young People

The goal of the project is to assess the viability of a social credit lending system for young people who have aged out of care. During crises, these young people often lack a financial safety net. NICCSS has undertaken preliminary conversations with YACs from VACFSS and Aunt Leah's in order to locate the gaps for young people who have aged out of care that could be filled by an ethical lending system. They reported that young people often lack funds for basic needs such as food, housing, medical cost and transportation, as well for aspirational needs like technology, education, career and personal development. The project would work with young people, community partners, financial institutions, health care providers, housing providers, and corporations to develop an ethical social credit lending system responsive to the needs of young people, giving them choice without miring them in needless debt. The project would work to establish a social credit score system whereby young people would receive "credit" for demonstrating connectedness to community and pro-social activities that would give them access to much-needed capital. Young people often face poverty; the project’s repayment system would allow young people to be successful in meeting the terms of their loan by accepting cash repayments, as well as goal-related and meaningful experiences such as volunteer work or work skills development, which will further increase community connections and pro-social activities.
$50,000.00
2016

North Island College Foundation Trust Fund

Employment Transition Construction Labourer Program

The Construction Labourer Employment Transition (CL-ET) program is a unique and innovative program designed by North Island College to provide skills-based Post Secondary Education to learners who experience barriers to education and employment due the impact of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and brain injuries. The program offers a unique, hands-on, active-learning approach, combining employment skills, workplace essential skills, and carpentry skills. The program also offers valuable life supports through community mentors who provide one-on-one guidance and training to the students in a number of areas where the impact of their disability causes barriers or challenges e.g. budgeting, transportation, and food preparation. On completion of the program, persons with disabilities will acquire employment skills to help them maintain work and acquire entry level construction skills leading to employment opportunities as construction labourers or carpenter assistants. North Island College's Construction Labourer - Employment Transition program is the only program of its kind in BC.
$50,455.00
2014

North Shore Multicultural Society

NEONOLOGY 2.0

NEONOLOGY 2.0 emerged from the success of the NEONOLOGY Initiative. Under the direction of NSWAC (NS immigrant planning table - 17 orgs), NSMS developed NEONOLOGY as a model of best practices in diversity and anti-oppression education. NEONOLOGY has engaged more than 3000 grade 10 students in workshops exploring power, privilege, stereotypes, and the underlying causes of discrimination. Over 80% of these students indicated that the workshops increased their understanding of discrimination and its impact on the community. Students and teachers urged NSMS staff to offer a similar workshop to younger students, saying that students need to understand issues of diversity before entering high school. Research confirmed discrimination and isolation as risk factors for NS children preparing for high school1. In response to this need NSMS will deliver NEONOLOGY 2.0, a program engaging grade 6/7 students in developmentally appropriate anti-oppression and anti-bullying themed workshops in their classrooms. Students in grades 10-12 will be trained to provide mentorship to the grade 6/7 student.
$60,000.00
2012

Nzen'man' Child and Family Development Centre Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Pacific Community Resources Society

Surrey Youth Collaborative Project

The City of Surrey has the largest population of youth in the Province and grows at a rate of approximately 1000 new people a month. Many of these new residents are youth who come from diverse backgrounds that place them at risk. At present there has been no one providing overarching leadership in bringing youth and youth providers together to plan for youth. This deficit has left youth served by overstretched services and one-off projects that often are unsustainable. The Surrey Child and Youth Committee, with the support of its member agencies including the City of Surrey, Surrey School District, and MCFD, is proposing to assume a role similar to the Surrey Children’s Partnership (ECD and Middle Years) by working with youth and their families, funders, agencies and the community to collaboratively establish a plan for Surrey youth. The project will establish a funders framework agreement, an MOU with funders and youth providers, data analysis, work with youth groups to identify their priorities, leading to a collective impact planning session and follow-up youth project
$52,500.00
2014

PeerNet Association of British Columbia

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development

Engaging British Columbians in shaping our collective climate legacy

This year, project staff met with 150+ organizations to better understand why & how these groups might wish to engage on climate policy. Several have become central allies. Clean Energy BC (power producers), Green Jobs BC (labour+NGOs), Climate Smart (businesses), the Bowen Group (high-emission industries + ENGOs), the Urban Development Institute (building developers), Union of BC Municipalities, Organizing for Change (ENGOs) and others have worked with us to highlight opportunities to advance climate policy collectively with their members. We are seeking funding for a 3-year Test Grant to strategically expand & deepen the participation of British Columbians in climate action. This will also allow us to respond to more requests from grassroots groups, First Nations and community leaders to provide analysis and assistance on development issues relevant to them. With climate policy windows officially open federally and provincially, groups can now advocate effectively (using a GHG emissions lens) on issues such as pipelines, tankers, fracking, LNG, etc. We will test & expand our engagement, by partnering with key allies across strategic sectors (e.g., buildings, industry, ENGOs, labour, local government, First Nations, grassroots groups and media) to engage their networks in shaping climate policy. This work will change “how we act”, “money, knowledge & people”, and “laws, policies & rules”, and in promoting a more engaged society, will inform our “values & beliefs".
$50,000.00
2016

Communities, Water & Carbon: Mitigating shale gas impacts in northeast BC

Shale gas development in northeast BC will significantly increase with the emergence of an export-oriented LNG industry. At the same time, the current regulatory framework is insufficient to protect communities from the negative impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Initial conversations with First Nations and community leaders in the northeast indicate that impacted communities would welcome information to enhance understanding of technologies, policies and best practices that could reduce the impact on water (quality and quantity – which are serious local concerns) and climate (GHG emissions). We propose to undertake research and engagement to reduce upstream shale gas development impacts in northeast BC: to provide accessible research findings and communications tools to First Nations and communities; to undertake coordinated outreach to strengthen networks across the north and to increase public awareness across the province; and to promote policies and practices with the provincial government and industry in collaboration with leaders in northeast BC.
$60,000.00
2014

PHS Community Services Society

Creating Bee Space

Our mandate is to enhance community through apiculture and to connect people & pollinators. We believe in the therapeutic value of beekeeping, its ability to connect all people to community, to nature and to themselves. We bring bees into marginalized urban communities and manage them side by side with community members through our mentorship program; we create green spaces and green opportunities for training, employment and education; we diversify our ecosystem by supporting pollinators and increase our food security by pollination of local food and production of local honey. The bee hive is the centre point of our programming, out from which a spectrum of opportunity radiates. The bees are an incredibly fertile substrate for meaningful connection, green skills training and access to nature. Our programming is socially innovative in its ability to reach out and connect to those considered hard-to-reach, welcoming and supporting individuals and their communities, building bridges of communication, de-stigmatizing bees and people and taking leadership in environmental stewardship. There is a wealth of opportunity in the city for bees and people of all kinds, and our project is helping our city to realize its potential and be a model for other cities. This project will grow our ability to offer meaningful programming that builds community capacity to support native pollinators & honey bees; extend our programming to new geographies & peoples; and embeds us in our community.
$50,000.00
2015

Youth Housing First

The PHS Youth Housing First Project was piloted in 2011 through the Vancouver Foundation Youth Homelessness Initiative. The objective of the project is to house chronically homeless youth between the ages of 18-25 residing in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver. Youth Housing First offers unconditional supported housing and stability for young people who have become homeless as a result of mental illness and addiction. In the next year we are developing the sustinability of our youth work through two streams - developing a product or products that fund the training and employment opportunities for youth at East Van Roasters and Community Thrift and Vintage (coffee, granola etc) - and creating youth specific clinics using the fee for service model at the Portland Clinic
$51,540.00
2015

PLEA Community Services Society of BC

Sto:lo Nation KidStart

PLEA and Sto:lo Nation's Community Development Department have agreed to work together to implement the KidStart Mentoring Program for children and youth living in Sto:lo Nation's Traditional Territory. KidStart was developed by PLEA 27 years ago and has already been successfully replicated in Campbell River, Courtenay and Victoria. These programs serve Aboriginal youth from the communities served, but this is the first time the program will be implemented with a specifically Aboriginal focus. KidStart's goal is to provide each participant with the opportunity to develop a supportive relationship with a Volunteer Mentor who is a consistent and positive role model. Mentors plan weekly activities in the community that will provide participants with experiences that will foster a sense of personal achievement, reinforce their strengths, and create new interests. The program is fundamentally preventative, rooted in the belief and supported by research that early engagement with a mentor improves participants' capacity to overcome adversity and become more active in their communities.
$50,000.00
2013

Positive Women's Network Society

Leading the Way: A Province Wide Peer Support Network for Women living with HIV

Leading the Way will establish a Province-wide peer support network that will provide gender-specific support and interventions for women living with HIV. Peer Mentor candidates will be chosen from a pool of women who have graduated from Leadership Training through the Pacific AIDS Network Leadership Institute, our current volunteer pool and from our long-standing members who have served as national and regional delegates. Participants will represent the mosaic of women living with HIV in BC. The network will be established in all health regions of British Columbia (two representatives from the Interior) and will work in partnership with local service providers to ensure women are receiving optimum care and support, and address the issues and community priorities identified in LEAD that are specific to women living with HIV.
$60,000.00
2012

Project Limelight Society

Project Limelight - Performing Arts Program

Recognizing a need for a creative outlet for youth living in Vancouver’s DTES, Project Limelight Society developed a free performing arts program, running four months long, twice a year. Participants are introduced to various theatre arts disciplines such as acting, creative writing, singing, mask, dance, stand-up comedy and improvisation. Participants spend 3 months rehearsing a full length production and then perform on a professional stage, giving them the opportunity to showcase everything they’ve accomplished. The last show was performed to two sold-out audiences of more than 600 people. Project Limelight Society provides food security and a safe place to build a community, which is particularly important for families who are also dealing with the additional challenges of addiction, poverty, discrimination or isolation. Providing this outlet for their children is very important to the families in our community, and it is reflected in the pride they experience, when they see their children perform.
$50,000.00
2013

Public Health Association of BC

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

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