Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Ecojustice Canada Society

Protecting Marine Habitat and Orcas in the Salish Sea

In June 2016, Ecojustice launched a legal challenge of the National Energy Board’s (NEB) report and recommendation to approve Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. As participants in the two year review, we filed uncontroverted evidence of harm to at-risk southern resident killer whales. For one, Kinder Morgan concedes it cannot mitigate noise impacts on the whales from a seven-fold increase in tanker traffic, as is required under SARA. Also, Raincoast (our client) filed a study showing that if the project is approved, there is a greater than 50 percent probability that the whale population will drop below 30 in the next 100 years, tantamount to extinction. We aim to set a clear precedent that regulators cannot avoid their legal responsibility to protect endangered species. T2 will add a second container terminal in deep-water by Delta—directly within southern resident killer whale critical habitat. By 2030, the expansion will increase container ship transits through Vancouver’s port and shipping channels by 500 vessels per year. Ecojustice is representing four clients as participants in the environmental assessment for T2. A review panel was recently appointed to conduct a hearing and submit a report and recommendation to Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change, likely by the end of 2017. We will work with our clients and their experts to submit evidence on how increases to vessel traffic will affect southern resident killer whales and other marine species.
$70,000.00
2016

A Tale of Two Pipelines: Securing Legal Protections for British Columbia

Ecojustice represented Raincoast Conservation Foundation, Living Oceans Society and ForestEthics Advocacy at National Energy Board (NEB) hearings for Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipelines. We submitted expert evidence on environmental threats and argued the project was not in the public interest. In July, the federal government approved the project, and we have now brought three legal actions: one alleging the review panel’s recommendation was based on a flawed environmental assessment and two challenging government approval and NEB certificates to authorize the project. Ecojustice is also representing Raincoast Conservation Foundation and Living Oceans Society in the regulatory review of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. We will focus on environmental risks while raising awareness of barriers to a transparent and participatory process. As a result of 2012 amendments to the National Energy Board Act, the review is compressed and will not include cross examinations or community hearings. We have been preparing for Kinder Morgan’s formal project application since 2011.
$60,000.00
2014

EVA BC

Building Safety Through Community: Safety for Aboriginal Women and Children

This 18-month project aims to increase the safety of on- and off-reserve Aboriginal women and their children in the Smithers region. It will expand the hours and mandate of two well-respected Aboriginal anti-violence workers to build relationships, share knowledge and develop community safety protocols with Aboriginal leaders and other Aboriginal social and health service providers. By building on existing safety networks and creating critical new ones the project will address sexual and domestic violence, and will help create a legacy of safety through the tools, coordination agreements and knowledge that will be generated and go beyond the life of the project.
$65,000.00
2011

Family Services of Greater Vancouver

Stay at Home - A Project to Keep Famlies in our Community

Family Services of Greater Vancouver plans to develop and operate a 10-bed emergency shelter for homeless women and their dependent children in Richmond, BC, in collaboration with the City of Richmond, CHIMO Crisis Services and the Richmond Women’s Resource Centre. The City of Richmond has provided a house and they are negotiating with BC Housing for operating funds. They seek support in order to provide services to residents of the shelter, including an outreach worker/housing advocate who will help residents find and maintain housing.
$68,200.00
2010

Fraser Health Authority

Exploring the experiences of adult home tube feed users and their caregivers within British Columbia

Home tube feeding (HTF) provides food and water through a tube when people cannot meet their nutrition needs by mouth. Despite its importance, there is very little research about the lived experiences of HTF users and their caregivers in Canada. Recent data suggests that adult HTF users in BC frequently visit hospitals for HTF-related problems. However, few adult HTF users (25%) accessed community dietitian services. This research is the first BC and Canadian study to explore the experiences and challenges of adult HTF users and their caregivers. It also is the first to bring users, caregivers, healthcare professionals and decision-makers together to create “best practice” recommendations.
$65,340.00
2019

Community-Based Program to Support Women and Families in Pregnancies after Stillbirth

This community-based participatory research project seeks to address the systematic challenge of stigma and fatalism in the area of stillbirth with a focus on the care of families who are pregnant after stillbirth. With an intersectoral team of researchers, clinicians and bereaved community members, the components of group care within a primary health care (PHC) setting will be explored using focus group discussions with bereaved families. This information will be used to develop and test a group program to address psychosocial support as an adjunct to regular antenatal care with the goal of expanding this program to satellite sites outside of the city centre. The introduction of this innovation would trigger change in several ways. Firstly, the bulk of research on prevention and care conducted in the area of stillbirth occurs in academic and tertiary care settings. By situating the study in PHC with an intersectoral team of researchers and collaborators who are representative of community and hospitals, this study aims to ensure that care and support will match the longitudinal nature of grief and reproductive trajectories of bereaved families. Secondly, by placing this program within a PHC clinic, such as South Community Birth Program and its satellite clinics makes the invisible visible and counters the societal stigma and fatalism associated with stillbirth. Grief and loss will be made visible and acknowledged within a maternity clinic setting.
$60,828.00
2016

Gitanmaax Band Council

Youth on Water (YOW!)

The mandate of the Youth on Water! (YOW!) is to educate, empower and engage youth, with a focus on youth at risk, from communities of the Skeena Watershed. We do this by conservation education, job skills training and healthy physical activity during five-day rafting programs on local rivers with certified guides. There are three main goals of the YOW! Program: i) provide a dependable, safe and supportive recreational opportunity with a strong leadership component for Hazelton area youth who are considered at risk and/or marginalized within their family or social situations, ii) provide critical support in the development of the region's future stewards and conservation leaders across geographic and ethnic communities, and iii) educate local youth with regard to the character, location, ecology and diversity of their local river ecosystems. The positive that we have seen in young people attending YOW! has a positive effect on their families and the wider community, including aspects of school life. YOW! was developed by SWCC as a pilot program in Hazelton in 2009.
$60,000.00
2013

Haida Gwaii Museum Society

Digitally Accessing Haida Culture

Our goal is to enrich the visitor experience in our museum, as well as in our partner’s institutions by providing a more in-depth learning experience through dialogue that stimulates interaction with visitors, and collaboration with researchers, scholars from other museums. We see the Haida cultural treasures in other museums as resources through which we can help educate people about Haida culture from the past and the present. The proposed project will allow us to “virtually repatriate” important cultural treasures, while, at the same time, building cultural knowledge that we can offer our partners that will help support their collections and provide knowledge about Haida culture. The proposed project will investigate the use of a technology called telepresence robots. This technology allows people to move virtually through a museum by remotely controlling a wheeled robot equipped with a camera, microphone, loudspeaker and screen display of a live video of the face of a museum interpreter. Using this technology, it is possible to visit a museum in an interactive, innovative, that has the potential for dialogue. This technology helps visitors who are geographically distant from a museum, and/or people who cannot travel, to follow a virtual guided tour from a remote location, and with complete independence. We would like to explore how this technology can be used by our museum and partners to make Haida culture more accessible to the public and to our communities.
$63,700.00
2016

John Howard Society Fraser Valley

The Prisoners' Health Care Project

This project will provide prisoners in BC with legal assistance on health care issues. It will employ a Prisoners’ Health Care Legal Advocate, working under the supervision of a lawyer, who will conduct intake interviews with prisoners and assess each case. The Advocate may then provide summary legal advice, act on behalf of prisoners with staff at the prisons, write submissions to prison officials or tribunals, or represent prisoners at hearings where health care is an issue.
$65,000.00
2011

Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies-JUMP

Increase math achievement among students in Aboriginal communities

In response to teachers' and community leaders' requests for curriculum and training, JUMP Math (JUMP) will undertake a two-year pilot project to implement its programs in 7 schools in Nisgaâ, Terrace, Kitwanga and Kitkatla communities, to: - Increase program dissemination to reach 930 students each year. - Increase math achievement among all students, even as we eliminate the gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students. - Increase math teaching skills of over 50 teachers in Aboriginal communities over the next 2 years. - Eliminate math anxiety among teachers and students. - Demonstrate efficacy of the program through evidence-based evaluation. JUMP will undertake to: - Provide training and ongoing support to teachers working in communities and schools with predominantly Aboriginal students. - Provide teacher handbooks, student workbooks and related materials. - Measure the efficacy of these programs. JUMP programs will be evaluated by UBC Professor, Linda Siegel. We expect this research to stimulate greater community and philanthropic support for expansion of these programs.
$60,000.00
2011

Knowledge Network Corporation

Working People: The Unknown History of British Columbia

Knowledge Network proposes to commission, produce and broadcast a series of three original half-hour documentaries, each made up of ten 2-3 minute short films, telling the stories of ordinary people who played extraordinary roles in the evolution of our province. Working People: The Unknown History of British Columbia will reach upwards of two million people in BC through television and the internet. Through this unique partnership opportunity with the Vancouver Foundation, our project will challenge filmmakers, engage viewers and create a lasting legacy.
$60,000.00
2011

Learning Buddies Network of the Lower Mainland Society

Learning Buddies Network tutoring (LBN)

Dr. A. Lipson, a pediatrician conceived of LBN in 2008. She observed a population of disadvantaged struggling grade 1-4 learners whose self esteem was faltering related to low school achievement. These children could access high quality medical care and pediatric assessment, yet their family circumstances did not allow access to simple one-on-one learning support and mentoring. She saw an unmet need for support for these children who typically have social and/or educational disadvantages. The idea of LBN was to pair secondary school or UBC students seeking meaningful volunteer experiences with these children. We provide one-on-one trained tutoring weekly in their schools in group sessions, focussing on academics, games, providing mentoring and instilling confidence. The children of interest attend inner city schools and may be disadvantaged economically and/or socially. LBN has grown and developed our own resources, and now provides reading and math volunteer tutoring in 15 programmes in Vancouver, Richmond and Burnaby.
$60,000.00
2013

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

Burnaby Youth Hub Support Project

The Burnaby Youth Hub opened in 2010 to give vulnerable youth easier access to educational, health and therapeutic services. A range of services previously scattered throughout Burnaby are now offered in one warm and welcoming location. Your support would help maintain the position of a Coordinator to facilitate this one-stop shop of services. Services are offered by individual agencies and organizations that collaborate to customize support for youth with multiple needs. These youth are not connected to the community and the Hub offers them opportunities for better life chances, greater economic independence and ensures they are living out of harms way. Services include an educational program, clinic, youth centre, counselling and job readiness and skills training and other services. Government, non-profit and community agencies work together to help each youth reach their potential. The Coordinator supports youth, service providers and staff, provides oversight of the network of agencies at the Hub, attends to physical plant issues and promotes the Hub to the community.
$60,000.00
2012

Nanaimo Association for Community Living

NACLWorks! "Employment First" Bridging Project

Nanaimo Association for Community Living supports and advocates for citizens with developmental disabilities and the people who care for them by promoting inclusion through various residential and community opportunities, activities, and services. NACL would like to continue its development by expanding its successful employment service, and requires financial assistance in bridging the gap between now and when our next day program employee is due to retire. This assistance will allow us to meet the employment needs of an additional five to seven job seekers without negatively impacting our staff or participants in our day program. Our intention is to continue our gradual transition to a more diversified model of service delivery. This transition time is an opportunity for people who want to work to have the means to access support, in order to reach their employment goals.
$60,000.00
2011

North Shore Multicultural Society

NEONOLOGY 2.0

NEONOLOGY 2.0 emerged from the success of the NEONOLOGY Initiative. Under the direction of NSWAC (NS immigrant planning table - 17 orgs), NSMS developed NEONOLOGY as a model of best practices in diversity and anti-oppression education. NEONOLOGY has engaged more than 3000 grade 10 students in workshops exploring power, privilege, stereotypes, and the underlying causes of discrimination. Over 80% of these students indicated that the workshops increased their understanding of discrimination and its impact on the community. Students and teachers urged NSMS staff to offer a similar workshop to younger students, saying that students need to understand issues of diversity before entering high school. Research confirmed discrimination and isolation as risk factors for NS children preparing for high school1. In response to this need NSMS will deliver NEONOLOGY 2.0, a program engaging grade 6/7 students in developmentally appropriate anti-oppression and anti-bullying themed workshops in their classrooms. Students in grades 10-12 will be trained to provide mentorship to the grade 6/7 student.
$60,000.00
2012

PeerNet BC

Building Inclusive Communities (BIC)

BIC brings youth together with older community members to develop and share facilitation and community engagement skills, culminating in inter-generational community projects. Each year, 14-16 registrants participate in 6 days of facilitation training focused on engagement practices and concepts. They participate in two five-week learning circles to mentor each other and explore ideas emerging from their training and conversations. PeerNetBC’s youth and community program staff facilitate, mentor and coach as the project evolves, supported by The Society for Children and Youth.
$70,000.00
2011

Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development

Communities, Water & Carbon: Mitigating shale gas impacts in northeast BC

Shale gas development in northeast BC will significantly increase with the emergence of an export-oriented LNG industry. At the same time, the current regulatory framework is insufficient to protect communities from the negative impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Initial conversations with First Nations and community leaders in the northeast indicate that impacted communities would welcome information to enhance understanding of technologies, policies and best practices that could reduce the impact on water (quality and quantity – which are serious local concerns) and climate (GHG emissions). We propose to undertake research and engagement to reduce upstream shale gas development impacts in northeast BC: to provide accessible research findings and communications tools to First Nations and communities; to undertake coordinated outreach to strengthen networks across the north and to increase public awareness across the province; and to promote policies and practices with the provincial government and industry in collaboration with leaders in northeast BC.
$60,000.00
2014

Playhouse Theatre Centre of British Columbia

Reanimating the Vancouver Playhouse

This is an ambitious plan to “re-animate” the Playhouse Theatre and its auxiliary spaces. Components include introducing a Theatre for Young Audiences series in partnership with a youth company, and adding their Recital Hall to the inventory of Vancouver performance spaces, with a series of curated and produced works, readings, workshops, classes, rehearsals, auditions and industry gatherings. A permanent box office window will be created as a visitors’ information booth.
$70,000.00
2010

Positive Women's Network Society

Leading the Way: A Province Wide Peer Support Network for Women living with HIV

Leading the Way will establish a Province-wide peer support network that will provide gender-specific support and interventions for women living with HIV. Peer Mentor candidates will be chosen from a pool of women who have graduated from Leadership Training through the Pacific AIDS Network Leadership Institute, our current volunteer pool and from our long-standing members who have served as national and regional delegates. Participants will represent the mosaic of women living with HIV in BC. The network will be established in all health regions of British Columbia (two representatives from the Interior) and will work in partnership with local service providers to ensure women are receiving optimum care and support, and address the issues and community priorities identified in LEAD that are specific to women living with HIV.
$60,000.00
2012

Qmunity BC's Queer Resource Centre Society

Aging Out: Belonging in Health Care for LGTB Seniors

Aging Out is a three-year public education and policy development project aiming to increase inclusion and belonging for lesbian, gay, transgender, and bisexual (LGTB) seniors in BC's health care system. Workshops will increase awareness among health care providers of the health-related needs specific to LGTB seniors. Public dialogues will help create community-driven policy on health care for LGTB seniors. Work within health/community care facilities will decrease barriers LGTB seniors face in accessing health care. With the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, a community-driven document of policies and practices to improve health care for LGTB seniors will be developed and delivered to the BC Ombudsperson's office.
$60,000.00
2011

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Restoring Governance for Salmon Conservation in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary

This project addresses the failure of governments and agencies to protect salmon habitat in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary. This failure has come at the detriment of globally significant salmon runs and the First Nations, local communities, economies and other wildlife that rely on these fish. A huge opportunity now exists to test governance and funding models for delivering a First Nations and community-lead initiative that envisions salmon resilience in the Lower Fraser. Using salmon as the indicator for freshwater sustainability, an initiative focused on habitat conservation will guide planning, restoration and management, facilitating recovery of a degraded river and its salmon.
$70,000.00
2017

Richmond Food Bank Society

Communities Mobilizing for Justice - Addressing Poverty through Dialogue to Action

Our project, 'Communities Mobilizing for Justice' aims to examine, influence and change the systemic behaviours, rules and processes that create barriers to access for people experiencing poverty and do not address the social determinants of health. These people are disproportionately single parents, seniors, immigrants, youth, LGBTQ, disabled people and people with mental health and/or addiction issues. With networking, skills-building and mentoring, this project gives voice to the unheard, and encourages inclusion and participation for people experiencing poverty so they can actively advocate and promote their collective ideas for change and be decision-makers in the larger community.
$61,500.00
2017

Ridge Meadows Association for Community Living

Rotary at Work BC

Participating Rotary Clubs take on the role of educating their members and businesses about the benefits of hiring people with disabilities and the importance of creating stronger and more vibrant communities.Once a business considers filling vacancies with people who have a disability, Rotary at Work will connect employers to local employment agencies.The Rotary Liaison will create and manage a database of Supported employment agencies that are equipped to match job seekers to postions. The www.employmentforall.ca website is designed to educate and provide a seamless way for employers to request supported employment services in their area.Once the employer registers their services request the Rotary Liaison will match a Supported Employment service which will collaborate to;locate potential candidates who have a disability,pre-screening these candidates,provide on-the-job training,assist with workplace accommodations and provide on-going support.Rotary Clubs recognize the benefits of people who have a disability. Tapping into this labour pool is good business.
$62,100.00
2014

School District #5 - Southeast Kootenay

Continuing the Journey with the Elders

The project is to continue to have Elders at Mount Baker Secondary School. We have for the past two years had 3 Ktunaxa Elders and 2 Metis Elders as part of our school. It is part of the school’s comprehensive plan to support Aboriginal learners and Aboriginal Education. This continuation will allow for a fuller and deeper integration of the Elders into the school system. Currently, the youth seek out the Elders when they need their guidance, help and support as do teachers and staff. The Elders interact in many ways: they teach cultural practices, help students research their ancestry, support and teach Ktunaxa language, provide support in all aspects of Aboriginal Education programs, are part of Restorative Justice, provide a first voice in classes especially First Nations Studies 12, Social Studies and English First Peoples, develop leadership skills with students, are role models, are advisors on Aboriginal Education, take part in events and most importantly are Elders (in the deepest most authentic sense). Knowing that culture cannot be programmed, programs can reflect culture).
$60,000.00
2011

School District #50 - Haida Gwaii/Queen Charlotte

Haida Gwaii Semester in Natural Resource Studies

The HG Semester in Natural Resource Studies addresses the paucity of post-secondary opportunities for residents of Haida Gwaii and provides economic development for rural communities. The vision is for locally integrated university education inspired by the people, communities, and environment of Haida Gwaii. The program offers students from Haida Gwaii and across British Columbia an immersion opportunity in a unique resource-dependent community where the issues facing resource managers around the globe converge at a local scale. By improving access to education for aboriginal and non aboriginal students this innovative program contributes to the sustainability of rural communities and households by increasing economic opportunities for local workers and businesses. Our approach to teaching allows students to learn from local knowledge holders, academics and researchers, providing critical linkages between traditional knowledge and western science. This dialogue between knowledge systems re-enforces collaboration and partnership between aboriginal and non aboriginal communities.
$60,000.00
2011

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