Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

School District #62 - Sooke

Nature Kindergarten

Sooke School District intends to offer a Nature Kindergarten program, beginning in September 2012, that provides Kindergarten students with outdoor learning every morning regardless of the weather. In natural, outdoor settings, the students will engage in increased physical activity and develop strong connections to the natural world and the Aboriginal Ways of Knowing. This model was inspired by forest preschools, which were started in northern Europe almost fifty years ago, and can now be found throughout Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. The Nature Kindergarten will be taught by both a Kindergarten teacher and an early childhood educator (ECE). This teaching model and program are unique within the B.C. public school system. Nature Kindergarten aims to address a growing need for young children to spend more time outdoors connecting to nature. University research partners will study the academic, personal and social benefits of this model. This is a two-year 'proof of concept' pilot, that, if successful is hoped to be replicated in school districts across B.C. and beyond.
$60,000.00
2012

Sea to Sky Community Services Society

Mentorship Employment Program (MEP) - Years 2 & 3

The Mentorship Employment Program will provide opportunities for both young adults with developmental disabilities and the local business communities to broaden their expectations of how persons with disabilities can meaningfully contribute in the workplace. The Program will help participants discover and develop their interests and skills in the pursuit of employment opportunities, and will facilitate increased accessibility and inclusion in Sea to Sky communities and labour markets. The Program will provide participants with opportunities to explore 3 employment options through supported unpaid and short term employment experience in order to find the best/most appropriate employment opportunities, where both employee and employer needs are satisfied. SSCS is uniquely positioned to successfully deliver this program using our related experience and existing collaborative networks. We have been helping adults in their career choices since 1990 and have worked effectively with partners in many of our employment and disability focused programs.
$60,000.00
2012

Sea to Sky Family Drop in Centre

Over the past decade, the Sea-to-Sky region has seen significant growth, with many new families. To ensure these families are able to connect with needed resources, Sea-to-Sky Community Services Society wants to open a Drop-in Family Centre in Squamish that offers referrals and information, workshops, peer support and child-minding to families with children ages 0 to 18. The program would be led by one half-time Family Support Worker who would host two drop-in sessions per week and offer one-on-one support with families as needed.
$60,000.00
2010

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation

Coastal First Nations Regional Monitoring Strategy

This project aims to increase the capacity of First Nations to monitor and steward important cultural and natural values in their territories by implementing a coordinated approach to gathering data and monitoring impacts. Phase two of this project will help to ensure data collected is used in planning and decision-making; explore mobile technologies to increase effectiveness of data collection and analysis and provide ongoing training and support to communities to integrate the project.
$65,000.00
2010

Sunshine Coast Association for Community Living

Garden to Table Food Hub

SCACL is embarking on a three year initiative to develop their commercial store front into a sustainable social enterprise that offers community inclusion and employment opportunities to persons with disabilities. The concept is to operate a "Garden to Table Food Hub". The store front would offer sales of local produce and value added food products, resources, training in food production and catering, sustainable gardening workshops, community kitchens and a shared commercial kitchen. The "Food Hub" would offer exciting sustainable employment opportunities in agriculture and food production and expand social and community inclusion opportunities to persons who are marginalized by traditional work hours and places. The idea for the project came from meeting other successful social enterprises such as SOLE Foods in Vancouver and the growing of our own food over the past two years. SCACL has been meeting for over a year with community groups about the concept of the "Food Hub" and has several partnerships and consultants in place to assist in the development and success of the project.
$60,000.00
2012

The Children's Foundation

Chili, Chai and Chat Family Nights

This pilot will respond to the need for parents to informally engage with each other, mingle, share experiences and acquire parenting skills. The pilot will operate out of the existing “MyZone” (low cost low barrier after school drop in program offered by the City of Surrey) at Guildford Recreation Center.The City of Surrey has committed to working with community partners to use the My Zone programs as an aopportunity to outreach to parents to provide specific connecting activities; community dinners, parent education and other activities.MyZone staff have already developed relationships with parents/caregivers of children who are enrolled in the after school programs at Guildford. OPTIONS Services to Community and The Children’s Foundation will collaborate to provide a range of supports including: a part time outreach worker that connects with the children’s parents/cargivers and identifies new parents; develops weekly activities and monthly community family dinners; a parent educator to identify facilitate parent driven parenting education and support sessions.
$66,000.00
2013

Tides Canada Initiatives

Campaign Accelerator

Campaign Accelerator (“CA”) seeks to change how people act in the political arena to ensure their environmental values are a key part of the debate. CA’s theory of change is that if organizations visibly mobilize pro-environment voters on election day, then government and opposition will be more inclined to strengthen environmental protection because they believe those voters can be decisive in elections. As parties see how their stance on various environmental issues helped or hurt them in the election in key parts of the Province, government will become more positively responsive to those issues and see the value of a strong environmental track record, resulting in better laws and policies. Engagement organizing (“EO”) is based on the belief that “organized people beats organized money.” BC’s tanker campaign is a prime example, particularly the work of Dogwood Initiative to mobilize thousands through locally-grounded organizing nodes across the Province. The 2013 BC election saw all parties wanting to “look strong” on tankers in response to this force. CA flips this approach on its head: training and mentoring grassroots leaders so they can apply EO tools on local environmental issues. CA is building a network of community leaders using EO to enable local citizens to hold their elected officials to account and ensure government recognizes that environmental values (beyond big campaigns like tankers) are widespread and can move voters. The 2017 election is a first test.
$70,000.00
2016

Reconciliation Canada - New Way Forward

Reconciliation Canada is engaging Canadians in reconciliation through experiential transformative change processes delivered by the following: Reconciliation Dialogue Workshops & Action Plans Targeted at community and organizational leaders, these workshops provide the opportunity for participants to engage in meaningful dialogue, build relationships and develop reconciliation action plans. Workshops will include a youth specific stream. Leadership Training & Core Competencies Assessment - Targeted to existing and emerging youth, community and organization leaders to develop reconciliation values-based leadership skills. In conjunction Reconciliation Canada will assist organizations with assessments of core reconciliation competencies and development of roadmaps to guide reconciliation initiatives. Sustainable Economic Reconciliation Dialogue & Action Plans - Workshops focused on economic reconciliation bring together stakeholders for creative dialogue to build meaningful partnerships and the co-development of Sustainable Economic Reconciliation Action Plans.
$70,000.00
2014

Hartley Bay Great Bear LIVE

The Gitga’at First Nation, located in Hartley Bay on the north coast of B.C., have developed land and marine use plans for their territory that include as key principles: protecting ecosystem integrity, ensuring their unique and rich culture is preserved and enhancing their capacity to engage in research and resource management. Gitga’at entities have requested that PWI collaboratively develop and deploy a Great Bear LIVE remote camera project in Gitga’at territory. Great Bear LIVE is a technologically advanced remote monitoring system developed by PWI to monitor terrestrial and marine wildlife through video and audio which can be streamed live online for broader public engagement and education. This project will meet 2 key community-identified objectives: 1. To employ non-invasive research and broad-based public education tools to further environmental protection, understanding and long term monitoring of Gitga’at traditional territory. 2. To engage and prepare youth as future stewards of Gitga’at territory by providing training in technology,wildlife monitoring and stewardship.
$60,000.00
2014

Pacific Wild/Coastal Connections-Virtual Rainforest Initiative

Coastal Connections- Virtual Rainforest Initiative (CC-VRI) is an educational program focused on utilizing new technology, experiential learning and locally-relevant resources connect youth in place-based communities to with the lands and waters of their traditional territories. Piloted in the coastal First Nations communities of Bella Bella and Hartley Bay, the program uses interactive white boards, remote wildlife webcams, and outdoor natural history training to bring ecology and conservation to life and to cultivate a new generation of stewards and natural resource managers in the Great Bear Rainforest. This collaborative effort between Pacific Wild, local community groups such as QQS Projects and the Gitga'at Land and Resources Stewardship Society, the Bella Bella and Hartley Bay community schools, along with the American Museum of Natural History and the Nature Conservancy, strives to develop an educational model that will provide youth with the passion and skills needed to pursue education and employment opportunities in science and conservation for years to come.
$70,000.00
2011

UBC - Okanagan

An Action Plan for Sustainability of TCARE: Building Health-Care Navigation

This new project, adapted from the innovative nurse-led navigator TCARE project funded by Vancouver Foundation in 2013-2014, will now sustain a volunteer model for care. The purpose of this project is to pilot the use of trained volunteers who are partnered with a nurse mentor, to provide navigation services for older adults living in rural communities with life-limiting chronic illness. These rural, older adults often live isolated in the community with little knowledge of, or access to, vital services. The navigation concept is an innovative model for addressing their needs, and there are now a set of navigation competencies to guide this new role. After receiving specialized training, volunteers will provide navigation services to frail, rural, older adults for one year. In their navigation role, they will: advocate for the patient and family; facilitate connections with the community; coordinate access to services and resources; and facilitate active engagement. A comprehensive evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of the volunteer navigator role will be conducted.
$60,639.00
2014

Umoja Operation Compassion Society of BC

Reaching out to African Immigrant and Refugee Families and Youth

Umoja's Literacy and Life-Skills program that has been running successfully for three years. The program has been designed to address the specific needs of immigrants and refugees from war-torn countries. Our most recent survey indicates that 100% of the participants are satisfied with the program and have reported that the program has met their literacy and life skills needs and has helped them adapt to their new country. So far more than 100 immigrants have participated in the program. Our intention is to continue to offer this vital program and also extend it to the youth. The project has two components to it: (A) The Literacy: English reading, writing, conversation and numeracy. For the youth, we will add the homework assistance component. Participants will attend Literacy/homework program 3 times a week from 4:30-6:30pm. (B) Life Skills: Once a week 6-8pm the project will build Canadian life and leadership skills to integrate successfully into the society through workshops, speakers and out trips.
$70,000.00
2010

University of British Columbia

Mathematics First Nations and Inner City K -12 outreach

This project focuses on enabling inner city aboriginal youths in the Lower Mainland and at First Nations schools throughout BC to acquire the necessary mathematical skills to enroll in post-secondary programs in science, engineering and other technical professions. This will be achieved through a combination of activities targeting both students and teachers, including summer math camps, mentorship programs, homework clubs and teacher training workshops. In Vancouver, a year-round support network will be established for at-risk students, including: tutoring by undergraduate mentors, homework clubs and summer math camps. There will be a camp for students transitioning into high school and a separate one for seniors, where students will have an opportunity to work with scientists and other faculty at UBC. Summer camps and mentorship programs will be further expanded to First Nations schools throughout BC. In addition, regular teacher training workshops on mathematics will be organized both in Vancouver and at several First Nations schools, seeking to enhance teaching skills.
$60,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia - Faculty of Medicine

Burn survivor quality of life in British Columbia: challenges and opportunities (Dr. Anthony Papp/Ms. Lisa Lacamell)

The objective of this research is to identify the fundamental barriers and facilitators to recovery and reintegration back into work and society among burn survivors living in British Columbia. Considerable research has shown that burn-related injury is a significant contributor to both short- and long-term physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impairments that have significant consequences on individuals, their families, and society at-large. However, we have very limited information about what factors influence the recovery and reintegration of BC’s burn survivor community despite the fact that burn-related injury is a leading cause of injury morbidity across the province. This gap significantly reduces the ability to understand the type of contexts that help populations recover following injury. In recent years, advancements in trauma care have led to tremendous decreases in mortality and reduced hospital length of stay. Unfortunately, the consequences of these improvements are that patients must now face many responsibilities for their care on their own. As such, it is important to obtain information about the resources and social environments that fundamentally contribute to recovery. As many injury survivors likely face similar barriers to recovery, it is important that these information is drawn from narratives from individual survivors to identify how best to strengthen local resource infrastructures. Research Team: Nathaniel Bell, UBC; Heidi Cave, Author; Anthony Papp, BC Professional Firefighters' Burn Unit; Lisa Lacamell, BCPFF Burn Fund
$63,178.00
2012

University of Victoria School of Social Work

Engaged research on implementations in response to overdose

This current proposal builds on a Vancouver Foundation Develop Grant (UNR15-0134) held by Wallace (with Pauly) in which we were immersed in community when drug overdose become a public health crisis and our results informing responses. Also, a NSERC Engage grant supported a unique partnership and the creation of a spectrometer drug testing instrument by the Co-investigator (Hore) with Vincent at STS Pharmacy. The advancement is novel due to the cost-effectiveness of the invention which allows for unprecedented scale-up and integration. Most recently, Wallace, Hore and Vincent were successful in an application to the Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy’s Innovation program to implement this technology, pilot drug checking and build capacity in Victoria BC. Our proposal pairs the piloting of this innovation in drug checking with community-based research through the partnership with AIDS Vancouver Island and its Street College program. Specifically, we will engage people who use drugs (PWUD) in research that can inform how drug checking can effectively be implemented and integrated in harm reduction. There is a lack of knowledge on many aspects of implementation such as; who may use or not use such services, what barriers exist to using the services, how individuals will respond to test results, how drug checking could impact the toxic illicit drug market, what opportunities drug checking may hold for reducing stigma, increasing access to supports, and develop relationships.
$70,000.00
2017

UVIC - Centre for Addictions Research

The Role of Transitional Housing in Health and Recovery from Homelessness

Although transitional housing has been shown to be effective in helping people move from homelessness to housed, little is known about staff and residents’ perspectives on the role of transitional housing programs or how experiences may vary with gender and history of substance abuse. This project will gather data on the factors in transitional housing that foster or inhibit transitions out of homelessness for men and women and those with or without problematic substance abuse. It will also provide evidence on how, or if, transitional housing can or should be supported as an intervention in response to homelessness in Canada.
$65,014.00
2011

UVIC Faculty of Social Sciences

Improving Food Security, Food Safety, and Health in Remote BC Communities (Dr. Aleck Ostry)

We will evaluate a new system of infrastructure support, licensing and training for slaughter providers which have been especially adapted for rural and remote communities. This system, enacted in 2010 by the Ministry of Healthy Living and Sport, is expected to improve both food safety and food security in these communities. This program of infrastructure support and upgrading of food production and processing skills is unique and requires evaluation to determine whether or not it works and, because it is a potential model for improving food security in rural and remote communities for other types of food and in jurisdictions in other parts of BC and Canada and other countries.
$61,913.50
2010

Vancity Community Foundation

Home Front: Making homelessness in Metro Vancouver rare, brief and one-time

Homelessness is a regional issue. Decisions made by one Metro Vancouver municipality can have an impact on its neighbours. A collaborative systemic approach to ending homelessness that engages government, business, philanthropy, non-profit organizations, community groups and citizens will make the best use of limited resources in order to make homelessness in Metro Vancouver rare, brief and one-time, and enable specific targeted strategies for vulnerable populations. Leveraging the skills and resources of many players to successfully achieve impact, Home Front will enhance the effectiveness of policies and strategies used in each municipality and engage the entire community in common cause.
$60,000.00
2017

Victoria Women's Transition House

Stepping Stones for Families: Ready to Rent

The Stepping Stones Steering Committee of 11 agencies developed a program for families who cannot find, keep and/or maintain housing. Many of these families have poor housing references and are not accepted into even the most basic of housing units. This program offers a 12-hour course called Ready to Rent that prepares families to be good tenants and provides support for up to six months to the families. They are seeking funding to stabilize the program, which started a year and a half ago, and also to develop a business plan, do a cost-benefit analysis and create a strong governance model.
$70,000.00
2010

Watari Research Association

Transition to Independence Program - TIP II

$70,000.00
2012

Wildsight Living Lakes Canada

Citizen Science Series

Outcomes will help influence systemic change through: 1. Normalizing active water stewardship with robust, scientifically defensible monitoring protocols that have been adjusted to be accessible and user friendly for citizen scientists. 2. Strengthened community understanding and engagement on the inter-relationship between land use, climate change and watershed health and that this stewardship is a collective responsibility. 3. Inform existing and newly emerging watershed and land use management policies, practices and pluralistic frameworks at the municipal, regional or sub-basin level. Our Citizen Science Series is an important initiative to engage, train and empower citizens and community groups to collect water data for policy implementation within their communities in lakes, rivers, wetlands, aquifers and glacial environments. We use provincial and federal protocols such as the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network in rivers and will be testing the adaptation of the protocol in partnership with Environment Canada to assess wetland health. We use Provincial Ambient Water Monitoring and Groundwater Protocols, and will be testing citizen science protocols for blue-green algae and glacial monitoring, which has not been done before in BC. We will work with the Adaptation to Climate Team - SFU and our science advisory board to implement and test the ability to asses climate change impacts within each of the monitoring protocols we use.
$65,000.00
2016

Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative Foundation

Keeping the Peace Fully Wild

The Peace River Break is the only connection between the abundant wildlife of northern BC and the Rocky Mountain Parks. This key ecosystem is currently threatened by poorly-planned road networks, coal mines, hydroelectric projects and other renewable energy developments which are outpacing the understanding of the area’s value to wildlife and traditional land uses. This project will raise awareness among decision makers of the region’s ecological importance and build the capacity of local organizations to advance policies and practices that protect and restore the vitality of the Peace River Break.
$60,000.00
2011

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