Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Access to Media Education Society

DisPLACEmeant

Providing an avenue of expression for youth with firsthand experience of displacement, this program honours their lived experiences while supporting efforts to enrich public understanding of the contributing factors + consequences of displacement + forced migration. The production phase of the program will see 24 youth creating 6 new (dis)placed-based digital stories, and up to 24 vlogs. The outreach phase will see participants publically screening and presenting their work, creating / facilitating workshops + online resources designed to increase awareness and prompt dialogue in schools + beyond. Featuring youth-made videos, lesson plans, background info + activities, the resources developed will: • Enable newcomer + indigenous youth to see themselves/their experiences reflected in the school curriculum, while easing some of the burden of explanation off of them. • Assist educators, students, + support workers in: (i) unlearning biases, dispelling misconceptions, challenging racialized violence, and institutionalized hate; (ii) learning about circumstances forcing Indigenous, refugee and newcomer students to leave their homeland, challenges faced in the process, and possible ways forward. The learning/unlearning that these resources facilitate are essential aspects of creating educational environments that are inclusive, support marginalized youth in “transitioning through and out of the education system”, and enhance their potential for broader civic engagement
$75,000.00
2017

Arts in Action Society

Groundswell: Grassroots Economic Alternatives

Our proposal comes in two parts: first a training institute where young people (up to age 35) can come together for a year's intensive program to imagine, design and build new enterprises including cooperatives, collectives, non-profits, arts and artisanal enterprises, self-employment scenarios and other grassroots configurations: all explicitly contributing to a community economic fabric of reciprocity. Each program will run for ten months: 4 months of intensive work, a month of strategizing and proposal planning, then 5 months of supported project development. Participants will develop the comprehensive skills - individually and collectively needed to run their own enterprises. The second piece is that we will link graduates and their new initiatives into a network of mutual aid and support. Each graduating participant and enterprise will be a member of the Groundswell Co-op relying on and supporting one another, and being supported by the collective institutional, organizational and financial resources. Ongoing reciprocity and interconnectedness is the key to our proposal.
$70,000.00
2012

Ashoka Canada

Changemaker Showcase and Challenge

Ashoka Canada will collaborate with colleges and universities to organize a series of Changemaker Showcases that will connect students to local innovators and opportunities for changemaking. Each showcase features a main speaker, two youth-led projects, an open mic session for students to share current projects, followed by an informal networking session. Ashoka Canada will record each 10-minute talk and showcase them on its website as free resources that can benefit other social innovation educators. Our partner schools in BC will take turns hosting and organizing each of the showcases, which are open to the public. In conjunction with this series, we invite all students who are inspired to take part in a daylong social innovation bootcamp and launch a project as part of our Changemaker Challenge. Educators from Ashoka's partner schools will co-design the bootcamp ahead of time at a special educators summit and then co-facilitate the bootcamp as well as guide participants through the challenge. Qualifying teams will be able to receive funding to start their projects.
$77,000.00
2013

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Frog Hollow Neighbourhood House Pathways Out of Poverty

Pathways Out of Poverty pilots a strength-based collaborative project to build capacity among immigrant women & their families to: -Understand possible pathways out of poverty & for achieving a living wage. -Navigate training/employment services & related community supports -Develop problem solving, networking & assertiveness skills needed to address personal & systemic barriers. -Develop leadership & speaking skills to facilitate participation in public dialogue to address systemic barriers & key employment issues. The need for programming to support local immigrant women to move into paid employment was identified in 2006 and 2009-10 through the Frog Hollow Community Connections Project. In 2009, Jennifer Chun, Department of Sociology at UBC, broadened this exploration by facilitating 4 city wide neighbourhood cafes to identify the issues prevent women obtaining a "living wage" or work in their field of expertise. Pathways Out of Poverty is a collaboration between organizational stakeholders & immigrant women to positively address issues of personal & systemic exclusion.
$76,302.00
2012

Astrolabe Musik Theatre Society

The Lake / n’-ha-a-itk

The Lake / n’-ha-a-itk is a musical documentary about, and that re-interprets as a film (the only Canadian opera on film), a historic BC opera integrated with contemporary syilx / Okanagan culture in an extraordinary cross-cultural collaboration. It addresses under-representation of Indigenous peoples; raises awareness of Canadian women composers; and removes barriers of access, changing an established social system which allows only certain segments to experience opera. Widely accessible through low ticket prices, community venues and, eventually, online, it liberates an entrenched art form, opening its doors to all.
$75,000.00
2018

Bard on the Beach Theatre Society

Bard on the Beach - Community Diversity

Our proposed project is an overall Community Diversity Strategy that is aligned with three categories: 1. Training/Employment: We will expand our Artistic Associates by adding two new positions to include more gender and culturally diverse voices. Bard’s Associates are involved in aspects of artistic planning including programming, casting and development activities. These new Associates will identify new projects, build new relationships, and work on increasing diversity in our audience. In addition, we will hire cultural consultants for specific productions to protect cultural sensitivities. We will increase the Bard Studio workshops and train more diverse performers, increasing the number of qualified artists to be employed on our stage and across Canada. Bard’s artistic team will travel throughout Canada to identify and collaborate with more diverse artists. 2. Education: We will add additional Bard in the Classroom and Neighbourhood workshops (provided for free); develop a Distance Education Streaming Education component; and train more Teaching Artists to establish a more diverse roster of teachers for all our programs. We will host and engage in community wide forums to discuss diversity issues, share our findings and encourage others to be more inclusive of many perspectives and voices. 3. Development of New Work: We will develop diverse plays from different cultures through the Bard Lab Program and focus on engaging more gender diverse playwrights and creators.
$73,875.00
2017

Enhanced Training and Coaching Initiative

We hope to create the Bard Artist Training Department, expand on our existing training offerings and build a strategic three year plan to make a significant contribution to artist training in Vancouver. We will create a Head of Training and Coaching position who along with the Artistic Associates will identify what training will be most beneficial, source and consult with appropriate coaches, and create a curriculum that addresses the ongoing needs of the company and community. Over the course of three years, we will expand and enhance existing training opportunities by adding time and additional instructors and experts; we will increase the honorarium for participants making training more accessible and we will offer more coaching resources throughout the performance season, ensuring the health and safety of our company. We also plan on developing a workshop program for the community year-round, welcoming local and international master instructors, and will offer professional development opportunities to our artistic staff to benefit both the Bard Company and greater arts community.
$71,000.00
2014

Britannia Community Services Centre Society

Thingery - A Lending Library of Things

Equipment lending libraries are proven models for reducing a neighbourhood's ecological footprint. Despite long established lending library organizations in most Canadian cities, lending libraries struggle to scale. We've worked with three neighbourhoods in Vancouver to show that there's an appetite for more lending libraries that are located directly in neighbourhoods. Our project will pilot three equipment lending libraries, called a Thingery, in shipping containers and through donations of underutilized equipment, provide community members with access to equipment that they don't ever need to own.
$75,000.00
2017

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Building Climate Justice Education in British Columbia

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA), through its Climate Justice Project (CJP), will develop an education strategy to share current research findings about climate change and inequality with schools and the broader public. Since 2009, the CJP has generated a body of research that explores such areas as transportation policy, food security, resource and forestry policy, employment and green jobs, energy policy and carbon pricing strategies in the BC context and through an equity lens. This research serves as building blocks of an integrated and equitable climate strategy, and a bold vision of how BC can move forward in a zero-emissions future. This project is an engagement and education strategy that will translate the CJP's findings and research into educational materials that can be used by teachers and schools, along with community groups and other popular education efforts, with a focus on curriculum resources and professional development for teachers. This project will enhance young peoples' understanding of salient issues around climate change and climate action.
$70,000.00
2012

Canadian Mental Health Association - Kelowna & District Branch

Connected by 25

Connected by 25 is an innovative, cross-sectoral project that addresses the needs of young people between the ages of 16 and 24 in the Central Okanagan vulnerable in their transition to adulthood. Feedback from young people and community stakeholders identified both the need and rationale for the project, and a CAI service innovation grant allowed a two year pilot of Connected by 25 to start in early 2012. The project builds capacity within the community to ensure that young people at risk of falling through the cracks in their transition to adulthood have access to the services they require. It further serves to build capacity in youth themselves by offering the relational, emotional, and material supports they need. The project incorporates a dedicated part-time community capacity coordinator, who works with community based organizations to enhance collaboration, and identify and address systemic barriers. Concurrently, a full-time youth navigator provides directs supports and assistance to navigate complex systems, build connections and achieve success in their lives.
$80,000.00
2012

Collingwood Neighbourhood House Society

Expanding Curriculum for Change to Lower Mainland Municipalities

In 2011-2013, Living in Community (LIC) developed and delivered a Vancouver Foundation funded sex work sensitivity curriculum that addressed the gap in awareness, knowledge and skills for front-line service providers in Vancouver - service providers who do not always know how to effectively respond to the unique needs of sex workers nor address the impacts of sex work and sexual exploitation on neighborhoods. In this project, LIC will build on the successful public education initiative we have created. We will expand the training to key stakeholders in neighboring municipalities that are ready for action and education. Training will be provided to municipal government, law enforcement, business, health and social service providers and residents. We hope that education on sex work and sexual exploitation issues will also encourage neighbouring municipalities to adopt Living in Community’s model of community development strategies in regard to issues related to sex work and sexual exploitation as recommended by the Missing Women’s Commission of Inquiry Report.
$75,000.00
2014

David Suzuki Foundation

Protecting the Peace: Enhancing Local Voices in the Greater Peace Break Region

The Peace Break Region supports agriculture and diverse wildlife, including threatened populations of bull trout, grizzly, fisher, and woodland caribou. The region has been severely degraded by logging, mining, oil and gas development and earlier large-scale hydro development. The region's lowlands are dominated by seismic lines, fracking operations, roads, pipeline crossings and other industrial infrastructure that seriously threaten the region's critical ecosystem services that regulate climate, disease outbreaks, and wastes, and that provide aesthetic, recreational and spiritual value. Unfortunately, the true worth of the region's natural capital is often poorly understood by policy-makers. For this reason the DSF and its partner West Moberly FN are proposing to complete a full natural capital valuation that will inventory and enumerate, in dollar terms, the non-market wealth of the region. This research will be accompanied by online mapping and other public engagement tools that will communicate the importance of natural capital to sustaining communities in the north.
$80,000.00
2012

DIVERSEcity Community Resources Society

Sports and Me Program

Sport and Me program is a partnership project between DIVERSEcity and the City of Surrey to provide outreach, family support, and sports readiness services to multi-barriered and Government Assisted Refugee (GAR) children. The project reaches out to children with the goal to provide a safe environment where they often have their first exposure to a recreation center and rec services, and the opportunity to learn sport etiquette, language and skill. Through this route, children can feel comfortable participating in school and community sports/recreation as they understand expectations around participation. The project also provides nutritional support through teaching of healthy children’s development, nutritional snacks/meals, and link to physical health opportunities – with the goal to engage children in active living for life. The funding request to the Vancouver Foundation will allow us to expand the current program and increase participation with other multi-barriered newcomer and at-risk children.
$70,000.00
2012

Ecojustice Canada Society

Protecting Marine Habitat and Orcas in the Salish Sea

In June 2016, Ecojustice launched a legal challenge of the National Energy Board’s (NEB) report and recommendation to approve Kinder Morgan’s pipeline expansion. As participants in the two year review, we filed uncontroverted evidence of harm to at-risk southern resident killer whales. For one, Kinder Morgan concedes it cannot mitigate noise impacts on the whales from a seven-fold increase in tanker traffic, as is required under SARA. Also, Raincoast (our client) filed a study showing that if the project is approved, there is a greater than 50 percent probability that the whale population will drop below 30 in the next 100 years, tantamount to extinction. We aim to set a clear precedent that regulators cannot avoid their legal responsibility to protect endangered species. T2 will add a second container terminal in deep-water by Delta—directly within southern resident killer whale critical habitat. By 2030, the expansion will increase container ship transits through Vancouver’s port and shipping channels by 500 vessels per year. Ecojustice is representing four clients as participants in the environmental assessment for T2. A review panel was recently appointed to conduct a hearing and submit a report and recommendation to Canada’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change, likely by the end of 2017. We will work with our clients and their experts to submit evidence on how increases to vessel traffic will affect southern resident killer whales and other marine species.
$70,000.00
2016

Fair Mining Collaborative

Transboundary watershed protection: building relationships, better laws and public awareness

Our work centers on creating strong, respectful relationships between BC First Nations, Alaska Tribes, and NGO’s on both sides of the border to collaboratively change antiquated ineffective mining laws and policy. Knowledge is power. FMC will provide our proven education program to the CTC, including; Fair Mining Practices: A New Mining Code for British Columbia (FMPC), Mine Medicine Manual (MMM), Fair Mining Training Program (FMTP), and the Northern Secwepemc Tribal Council (NSTC) Mining Policy. Many BC communities already use FMC’s products to increase their understanding of the mining regulatory system, and leverage change through shared decision-making and implementation of innovative best management practices that protect their interests. Very diverse users of FMC’s education program, (Amnesty International to the Tsilhqot’in National Government to Argentinian filmmaker Hernan Vilchez to mining industry organizations), have successfully changed conflicted relationships and made effective changes in regulatory systems. Forward thinking mining companies are recognizing First Nations as decision-making equals, knowing their projects must receive a social license from all affected communities, or the economic viability of their project will be jeopardized. Our work proves that sharing effective tools with the most affected groups, can change the status quo rapidly from the ground up, leaving legislators and recalcitrant industry to catch up.
$80,000.00
2016

Family Services of the North Shore

Connecting a Caring Community - Supporting Quality of Life

This innovative new community based volunteer project was identified and is being developed in partnership with 30+ local residents, volunteers and community partners in order to improve the quality of life for those who are marginalized and isolated as a result of being disabled, nearing end-of-life, or bereaved. It will reduce isolation, advance the health and well-being of individual adults and families, mitigate the effects of poverty, and improve access and linkages to systems of care and support. The volunteers will provide weekly in-home visits, bereavement support groups, telephone companionship calls, walking groups, therapeutic healing modalities (e.g. foot rubs, therapeutic touch, guided meditation) and social activities in collaboration with the needs and wishes of the participants. Volunteers will also gather data through case studies and surveys over 1-3 years to support and inform the development of public policy solutions, in collaboration with our community partners, to create long term systemic change within our community.
$75,000.00
2013

Fraser Region Aboriginal Friendship Centre Association

Indigenous Youth Affecting Change

Under an Indigenous youth led process, 4 new youth facilitators will begin training on an Indigenous cultural competency based learning tool which they will learn and then deliver and share under a social enterprise business plan. The social enterprise will generate revenues to address the needs of Indigenous youth aging out of care. Through a partnership table including academia, a series of workshops from a cultural competency curriculum will be delivered by youth facilitators to audiences on colonization and steps needed towards reconciliation. The workshops will be presented to municipal & provincial government departments, to public schools, for profit sector and special interests groups. Within the presentations will be an overview of issues affecting Indigenous youth and will present suggestions on how to better serve Indigenous youth through changes to policy, where to place enhanced resourcing for community based services and contribute to awareness on gaps in research. With the involvement of youth and community, a new youth position will be created to guide the social enterprise activities contributing to a legacy of supports for Indigenous youth aging out of care in Surrey. This project will create awareness of urban Indigenous issues, provide Indigenous youth with an advocacy voice and will contribute to a better understanding of the needs and supports needed to reduce the over representation of Indigenous children in care. Our youth are engaged and prepared.
$75,000.00
2017

Global Youth Education Network Society

Next UP grow program

Next UP is our flagship program at genius. Next UP (NU) is an intensive seven-month leadership program for young people age 18-32 who are committed to working on social justice issues, environmental issues and climate change. Next UP began eight years ago in Vancouver and now operates programs in Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon, Winnipeg and Ottawa. We have 384 graduates across the country with about 120 of them in BC. After 8 years of delivering and refining the NU program we want to offer new formats and versions of the program to different constituencies over the next three years. Next UP grow will allow us to deepen the scope and impact of our work and grow our network of social change leaders. The full-length NU programs run from September through to the following May. Each fall people apply to get in to the various NU programs and at the end of each selection process 12-16 participants are invited to form a program cohort in each program city. The program is free of cost to all participants and funding dependent we can provide support for childcare and participant travel. The cohort meets 1 evening a week and 1 full Saturday a month over the course of the 7 months and participants do work to explore their own leadership styles, learn about solutions to topical issues, develop key leadership skills and receive training in an array of areas to provide them with an excellent tool kit to draw upon in their respective leadership journeys.
$77,000.00
2015

Greater Vancouver Society to Bridge Arts and Community

SpaceFinder Vancouver

The Society to Bridge Arts & Community is leading a local consortium of organizations in launching the digital platform SpaceFinder in Vancouver. SpaceFinder is a free online matchmaking tool for artists and art spaces, intended to help facilitate the connection between artists and space. It provides extensive search functions with a focus on short or medium term rentals of creative spaces for rehearsal, performance, film production, workshops, & other arts related activities. SpaceFinder was designed by Fractured Atlas, an American based national non-profit arts service organization. It is currently in use in 11 US and two Canadian cities. This is a well-tested tool with thousands of current users. Operating in Toronto since November 2014, SpaceFinder users have found it to be an easy to use system that meets the needs of renting and/or finding space. As an accessible, free marketplace, SpaceFinder can be used by any size organization regardless of budget. The City of Vancouver and the Social Purpose Real Estate networks both have simple creative space directories. They lack the technological sophistication to contain detailed information and complex search functions based on the needs of artists and creative spaces.
$71,000.00
2015

Hope in Shadows Inc.

Developing the Hope in Shadows and Megaphone Vendor Program

This project will substantially develop the Hope in Shadows and Megaphone vendor program by expanding its reach while filling gaps in the support and training that vendors receive. The project's objectives - to increase vendors' sales and the number of active Megaphone vendors, to help vendors build their skills and to provide them with meaningful social connections - were developed after consulting with vendors and staff from successful North American street newspapers. This project will achieve its objectives through hiring a full-time vendor coordinator who will organize training workshops, team-building events and meetings for vendors. In addition to these group activities the coordinator will support and encourage vendors through field visits and individual check-ins. The co-ordinator will also do outreach to make vendor opportunities accessible to homeless and low-income people while building support for vendors among residential and business communities. This project will allow for the continuation of a Vendor Advisory Board, which had a successful three month trail in 2011.
$80,000.00
2012

Kootenay Career Development Society

Capacity Building Project - Year 2

Capacity Building Project - Year 2
$76,805.00
2010

Lu'ma Native Housing Society

Traditional Healers/Elders Project at Lu'ma Medical Centre

The disparity in health for Indigenous people is no longer acceptable. In order to improve health outcomes we must reconcile how health care is delivered to Indigenous peoples. who have experienced a much higher amount of consistent trauma over long periods of time from systemic discrimination and removal of children. Traditional Healers/Elders can engage Indigenous patients to actively participate in healing their body, spirit, mind and emotions to restore their health. Culturally integrated health care is innovative because the teachings and practices of ancient traditional healing is applied to empower individuals & families to solve health challenges today.
$74,983.00
2017

Meal Exchange

Real Food Challenge B.C.

Meal Exchange will bring together campus, community, and industry partners to leverage the $20M annual purchasing of B.C.’s campuses to drive demand for ecological agricultural practices-- focusing on improving water quality, wildlife habitat, mitigating climate change-- and improve animal welfare. To do this, we are adapting the award-winning Real Food Challenge from the U.S. to B.C. It w ill shift authority and resource flows on campuses, while also changing beliefs systems about the priorities of institutional procurement, through: -The Real Food Campus Commitment: university presidents publicly commit to the goal of purchasing 20% Real Food within 3 years, mandating foodservice companies and campus administration to change procurement practices. -The Real Food Calculator: provides a rigorous definition and process, based on existing industry certifications, to audit purchasing and identify areas of improvement to reach 20% Real Food on campus. Building off one-year seed funding from Real Estate Foundation and Vancity to test the program with 6 pilot campuses, support from Vancouver Foundation will allow us to adapt and sustain this program at all 11 universities in B.C. The Test grant’s funding through 2019 will give us the runway needed to measure results-- developing the evaluation tools and data to demonstrate the impact of campus purchasing on B.C.’s environment-- and establish long-term funding with campuses to scale the program across B.C. and Canada.
$75,000.00
2016

Miistakis Institute for the Rockies Inc.

Road Watch BC: Involving people in getting animals safely across the road.

Our program will integrate science, technology and innovation to address biodiversity loss associated with roads through the establishment of a citizen science program. Road Watch BC will enable the driving public to generate a large and spatially precise dataset of wildlife observations associated with Highway 3, using a smartphone application that allows passengers to immediately upload wildlife sightings and collisions to our on-line database.This information can then be shared with government agencies, scientists, civil society organizations, communities and local governments and to inform mitigation solutions, promote local awareness of crossing locations and change driving behavior. This program will influence systemic change by altering the flow of resources and how people behave. A citizen science approach improves the fluidity of knowledge and democratizes science by enabling the public to participate in information collection, analysis and sharing. Citizen science programming fosters dialogue within a community and builds engagement around a challenge, ultimately improving the diversity of stakeholders engaged in developing solutions. In addition, we expect to see behavior change whereby participants will know where wildlife are most common along the highway enabling modification of driving behavior. We also expect participants to have a general heightened awareness of the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions, and to adjust their behavior accordingly.
$75,000.00
2016

NEED2 Suicide Prevention Education and Support

Youthspace.ca

Youthspace.ca is a safe, moderated online service offering emotional support, crisis intervention, and information to youth in Greater Victoria. It provides a staff moderated forum, private one-to-one chats and the option of e-mailing a counsellor directly. It supports youth experiencing mental health, addictions and/or other crises with referral information and acts as a bridge to other local services. The program also engages Victoria youth as volunteers in a significant way in their community by providing volunteer training and a direct way to support their peers.
$71,000.00
2011

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