Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

NEED2 Suicide Prevention Education and Support

Youthspace.ca

Youthspace.ca is a safe, moderated online service offering emotional support, crisis intervention, and information to youth in Greater Victoria. It provides a staff moderated forum, private one-to-one chats and the option of e-mailing a counsellor directly. It supports youth experiencing mental health, addictions and/or other crises with referral information and acts as a bridge to other local services. The program also engages Victoria youth as volunteers in a significant way in their community by providing volunteer training and a direct way to support their peers.
$71,000.00
2011

North Shore Disability Resource Centre Association (NSDRC)

InclusionWorks North Shore

This innovative program assists and prepares young adults with developmental disabilities to transition from an inclusive high school experience to a more independent adult community based life, family governed and community supported. Not agency run, it unfolds the way life does, with skill enhancing activities in community settings (libraries, community centres, businesses, work sites, recreation facilities). Young adults participate in a “campus” type of experience that is flexible and serves a wide range of skill development, both part time or full time or on a “one course at a time” basis. Highly skilled coaches and educators provide support and instruction. CLBC currently funds some programs through North Shore agencies, however they are somewhat limited in nature, often operating in more self-contained settings outside the general community. Even those limited programs regularly face budget cuts and it is time to find a new, sustainable way to provide the education, social, recreational and employment skills programs that foster the growth young adults achieved during their high school years. Because these groups can be small and flexible, programming needs can change as needs of participants change, and they can be life-long learners and contributors to their communities through employment and/or volunteer work where they will be known by all its citizens, not just those with disabilities. This innovative and inclusive model is sustainable, economical and replicable.
$75,000.00
2017

Pacific Opera Victoria Association

MISSING; an acclaimed new opera, gives voice to the story of Canada's missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls

The opera MISSING addresses issues of enduring racism, violence against women, and threats to Indigenous arts, culture, and language. MISSING gives voice, in English and Gitxsan, to the story of Canada's missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. Scaling the piece for broader dissemination will serve to remember Canada’s missing and murdered Indigenous women and commemorate the impact of their loss with family and community. MISSING will forge deeper relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples; using art as a catalyst for healing, (re)conciliation, and revitalization of Indigenous art, culture, and language.
$75,000.00
2019

PeerNet Association of British Columbia

Building Inclusive Communities (BIC)

BIC brings youth together with older community members to develop and share facilitation and community engagement skills, culminating in inter-generational community projects. Each year, 14-16 registrants participate in 6 days of facilitation training focused on engagement practices and concepts. They participate in two five-week learning circles to mentor each other and explore ideas emerging from their training and conversations. PeerNetBC’s youth and community program staff facilitate, mentor and coach as the project evolves, supported by The Society for Children and Youth.
$70,000.00
2011

Planned Lifetime Advocacy Network

Network for Belonging

The Network for Belonging Initiative aims to extend PLAN's Personal Support Network Model in the broader community, in particular we will work with partners from the Brain Injury, Drug and Alcohol addictions, and mental health communities. The common theme of isolation is deeply felt in these communities and through initial explorations our partners believe that the Personal Support Network model, when tailored to address their unique needs will be an important strategy to increase belonging and decrease the devastation of living life in isolation. The Initiative is not just about sharing the concept of personal support networks; it is about developing financially sustainable models to support their application. Building sustainable PSN models across our partner organizations will yield rich learning which we will capture and share. This learning will both guide future PSN model replication as well as inform the public policy aspects of the Network for Belonging Initiative.
$75,000.00
2012

Playhouse Theatre Centre of British Columbia

Reanimating the Vancouver Playhouse

This is an ambitious plan to “re-animate” the Playhouse Theatre and its auxiliary spaces. Components include introducing a Theatre for Young Audiences series in partnership with a youth company, and adding their Recital Hall to the inventory of Vancouver performance spaces, with a series of curated and produced works, readings, workshops, classes, rehearsals, auditions and industry gatherings. A permanent box office window will be created as a visitors’ information booth.
$70,000.00
2010

Potluck Cafe Society

Recipes for Success

Recipes for Success (RFS) grew from more than a decade of experience working with employees from the community and the frustration of frequently failed attempts to transition those same employees into more permanent positions elsewhere. Most often this failure resulted from a lack of opportunities or a lack of human relations capacity to ensure that the job remained meaningful and supportive. For the past 2 years RFS has been working with value driven employers to promote Social Impact Employment. During those 2 years we’ve worked with 27 “traditional” employers and 6 social enterprises – each has told us the same thing: the HR best practices shared by RFS and the additional capacity provided by our Employment Support Workers help employees with identified barriers stay in the workplace. In other words, RFS is creating value for both employers and employees, and contributing to the long-term sustainability of meaningful work opportunities. With this next iteration of our work we are proposing to test an on-demand system of competency-based training supported by a digital badging campaign. At the core of this social innovation is a desire to realign the basic routines, resource flows and beliefs that are preventing the widespread adoption of Social Impact Employment; our goal is to recognize and champion the strengths and abilities of our program participants, and in the process to support the creation of a more inclusive, accessible and resilient local economy.
$75,000.00
2015

Powell Street Festival Society

Advocacy and Outreach Through Arts-based Community Development at WePress

This project will build on the ongoing work of PSFS to have a year-round presence in the DTES, to link the history of Japanese Canadian (JC) expulsion from the DTES during WWII with challenges of displacement faced by current residents, and to be a committed partner with residents and groups working in the neighbourhood. This partnership combines PSFS’ historical perspective and activity with the goals and operational infrastructure of WePress Community Arts Space, which houses a variety of art-making platforms, and welcomes people marginalized by class, sexuality, gender, race, culture, disability, mental health, and addictions. The social innovation lies in the ability to run paid workshops and sell merchandise to those who can afford them in order to generate revenue that allows PSFS and WePress to provide job and economic opportunities for low-income and marginalized people, teach new skills through free and low-cost workshops, provide a welcoming space and access to unique equipment for art-making and community-building, support DTES social justice groups, and promote JC art, culture, and history and the work of PSFS. In this way, PSFS and WePress can bring together people from diverse income levels to interact, make art together, and learn a little about each others’ lives. Furthermore, PSFS will continue to contribute to the development of a new independent social justice arts organization in the DTES and its long-term survival.
$75,000.00
2017

Presentation House Theatre

Learning and Forgetting

Young children entering the schools for the first time can have a tough time socializing, adding stress and challenge to their teachers and the school system. Parallel to this, seniors, in particular those developing dementia are experiencing more and more isolation being cut off from their communities as they enter long term care facilities. Presentation House Theatre is exploring a new program and performance experience that brings these two groups together for a shared, inter-generational connection involving live performance and interactive workshops that will increase the socialization of young children, while reducing the sense of isolation and disconnection for seniors.
$75,000.00
2018

Proton Foundation

Honour:Health to Hand - "Totems in the Forest"

Honor:Health to Hand is OMVC’s commitment & response to community requests to aid with healthy development, diversify the economic base for homes & community & offer a culturally appropriate exemplary positive initiative to transfer skills & knowledge from Elder to youth, as it is well recognized that all on-reserve aboriginal youth are at risk & the oral traditions are at risk of dying. We will engage 8 Haida youth, including male & females & those with disabilities, with 3 Master Carvers in a 27-week cultural training/skill development initiative. It includes certification courses, mentorship, health & entrepreneurial aspects; offered at NorthWest Community College Campus in Masset, the high school trade shop, OMVC’s education/ eco-tourism facility-Hiellen Longhouse Village, the carving studio in Old Massett, & Emily Carr UofAD. Endorsed & mentored by Master Carvers Chief 7idansuu Jim Hart & Christian White youth will earn certificates, learn Haida art design/carving/business skills & assist in 2 projects; replication of the historic heritage Hliialang’inagee gyaa’ang Totem that stood in Hiellen Village 150+ years ago & develop a “Welcome Sign” with two small 8’ totems for the entrance to Hiellen Longhouse Village, approved by the Haida Repatriation Society. This will be exemplary, inclusive & engaging. At completion both will be erected during a high Haida celebration during Canada 150. Youth & elders will participate. Healing & reconciliation for all will be profound.
$75,000.00
2016

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Restoring Governance for Salmon Conservation in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary

This project addresses the failure of governments and agencies to protect salmon habitat in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary. This failure has come at the detriment of globally significant salmon runs and the First Nations, local communities, economies and other wildlife that rely on these fish. A huge opportunity now exists to test governance and funding models for delivering a First Nations and community-lead initiative that envisions salmon resilience in the Lower Fraser. Using salmon as the indicator for freshwater sustainability, an initiative focused on habitat conservation will guide planning, restoration and management, facilitating recovery of a degraded river and its salmon.
$70,000.00
2017

Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre

MoreSports

MoreSports is a collaborative initiative that provides sustainable sport and physical activity opportunities for children and families, focused on kids who typically do not participate in sports. We build on existing community resources to deliver programs & events in partnership with schools, local government, community groups, private businesses and non-profits. The model is: go where children are, provide structures and programming that fit with what children and families actually want. The approach is unique in two ways: • First, barriers to participation are not only removed but are rendered invisible • Second, programs and activities are built on and integrated within existing structures and systems The strategy was designed to build on community strengths, capacities and priorities, foster social inclusion and develop the capacity to deliver a multitude of sport and skill development activities for local children and youth. Part of developing this capacity is fostering local leadership through the YELL (Youth Engage Learn Lead) initiative.
$75,000.00
2012

Salal Foundation

Beyond Coal Canada

Beyond Coal Canada is a collaborative project to oppose the export of US thermal coal through Canadian ports aimed at averting accelerated climate change for the benefit of future generations and the natural world. Beyond Coal Canada is the Canadian partner in the Power Past Coal coalition that is opposing the transshipment and export of coal from Montana’s Powder River Basin. When Fraser Surrey Docks and Lafarge Quarries first proposed their coal transshipment project in 2012 most observers thought permits would be issued within months and predicted our odds of defeating the project were slim. Our primary goal was to delay approval and construction. Three years later, the proposal is stalled, with important permits in limbo, widespread municipal opposition, organized and grassroots opposition, and a number of lawsuits working their way through the courts. The changed political circumstances have opened up promising new paths to victory, as well as new options for building a foundation to prevent future coal export expansions.
$75,000.00
2015

Salt Spring and Southern Gulf Islands Community Services Society

New Beginnings

New Beginnings is a vocational development program for adults with employment barriers. It provides individual and group-based training and support, work experience placements, and supported work search. The target group is marginalized and vulnerable people including those with disabilities, mental health issues, addictions, social isolation, poverty, and limited life skills. A second program priority is finding or developing positive, flexible and accommodating work placements for experience and entry level paid employment. The program has been overwhelmed with both the numbers and complexity of need of participants. Half of the people applying or referred to the program have chronic mental health, disabilities/autism complicated by many other challenges such as inadequate housing and poverty. On the other hand there is a rapidly increasing food security movement in the community which brings many entry level work opportunities. It is our intention to develop a farm/garden skills component to the program designed specifically for the participants with the highest needs.
$75,000.00
2013

Simon Fraser University - Faculty of Environment

Low Carbon Resilience: Practitioners as Drivers For Sustainable Communities

Climate change requires us to reduce emissions (mitigation) and prepare for impacts such as flooding, sea level rise and heatwaves (adaptation). To date, climate mitigation and adaptation have been planned separately, but it's clear there are major benefits to integrating them - an approach called low carbon resilience (LCR). As we shift to a low carbon economy and begin upgrading infrastructure to withstand climate impacts, we can save time and money using LCR approaches. This is good news for ecosystems, which are also challenged by climate change, as their health is central to innovative LCR approaches. This project facilitates and supports the role of professionals as LCR champions.
$75,000.00
2017

SPARC BC Society

Moving Towards Health: Promoting Accessible Built and Social Environments For Isolated Older Adults in Vancouver's West End (Co-lead Researchers: Karen Williams, SPARC BC; Eric Kowalski, West End Senior's Network Society)

Older adults who remain active in their community and regularly engage in physical activity report better health outcomes (Hanson et al, 2013). Conversely, older adults who are socially isolated are more likely to experience poor health (Dickens et al 2011). Our project, "Moving Towards Health: Promoting Accessible Built and Social Environments For Isolated Older Adults in Vancouver's West End", uses a senior-led community based participatory action research (CBPAR) approach to engage older adults in: a) research and promotion of accessible built and social environments in their neighborhood; b) the implementation of and research on a peer led intervention strategy that reaches out to isolated older adults to encourage them to become more active and socially connected. Phase 1 will lay the foundation for the CBPAR project and will involve forming an Advisory Committee; finalizing the research plan and completing a research ethics review process. Phase 2 will engage older adults in place-based qualitative research on the built and social environment in the West End including: a PhotoVoice process; a study of West End streets; the creation of age friendly pedestrian pathway maps. Phase 3 will consist of the development of a peer led outreach strategy to encourage isolated older adults to become more active in the West End. Phase 4 will take place alongside Phase 3 and will include researching the impact of the intervention. Phase 5 will consist of knowledge dissemination. Research Team: Jessica Smith, West End Senior's Network Society
$73,059.00
2014

St. Leonard's Youth and Family Services

Youth Innovation Lab

The Youth Innovation Lab originated out of the need for mentorship and pre employment opportunities for youth in care. St Leonard's has served youth at risk and youth in care since 1967- through a variety of traditional and non traditional programs. Outdoor adventure programs, a horse resource for girls, gang prevention, a day school and of course our residential homes have historically provided high quality care for youth. Research indicates that the jobs of the future reside in the high tech industry. A majority of youth in care struggle to achieve the training and education that they need for future employment success. There are many reasons for this, including the lack of permanency in home life, education, etc. Through our partnerships with the school district, the MCFD, the high tech community and others, we are building an accessible coding school to mentor youth through training and internships opportunities. The project started last year with an evaluation conducted by McCreary. Year two will focus on youth in care recruitment, leadership development, curriculum design, internships and with the support of Vancity and SFU, the development of the CSR and learning community framework for our tech community partners. The long range business goal is to see the tech and broader community support the ongoing financing of the program.
$75,000.00
2015

The Arthritis Society

Electronic Arthritis Triage Strategy (EATS)

The EATS Program serves to reduce barriers to treatment for people with arthritis. It will ensure appropriate treatment for their properly diagnosed arthritis by the appropriate healthcare professionals (HCPS), in a timely way that will help to reduce disease progression and disability. Earlier treatment will reduce the need for more invasive treatments including medications with higher side-effects and the need for surgery. This will be achieved through the development and implementation of an online triage tool that uses standardized examination questions where the responses are processed through a decision support system (based on BC Rheumatology guidelines) to determine the best route to treating their arthritis. EATS will generate a report summary of the patient responses combined with other key patient data from the healthcare system. This will be accessible by the primary care provider, rheumatologist and/or allied HCP. The result is the expedited referrals of high priority patients to rheumatologists, which improves specialist access, increases positive health outcomes for patients due to early disease intervention and reduces the need for costly medications. This will generate significant cost savings for the MoH. Our partnerships with healthcare professional bodies (rheumatologists, GPs & allied HCPs) will assist in the adoption and utilization of EATS.
$75,000.00
2017

Tides Canada Initiatives

Campaign Accelerator

Campaign Accelerator (“CA”) seeks to change how people act in the political arena to ensure their environmental values are a key part of the debate. CA’s theory of change is that if organizations visibly mobilize pro-environment voters on election day, then government and opposition will be more inclined to strengthen environmental protection because they believe those voters can be decisive in elections. As parties see how their stance on various environmental issues helped or hurt them in the election in key parts of the Province, government will become more positively responsive to those issues and see the value of a strong environmental track record, resulting in better laws and policies. Engagement organizing (“EO”) is based on the belief that “organized people beats organized money.” BC’s tanker campaign is a prime example, particularly the work of Dogwood Initiative to mobilize thousands through locally-grounded organizing nodes across the Province. The 2013 BC election saw all parties wanting to “look strong” on tankers in response to this force. CA flips this approach on its head: training and mentoring grassroots leaders so they can apply EO tools on local environmental issues. CA is building a network of community leaders using EO to enable local citizens to hold their elected officials to account and ensure government recognizes that environmental values (beyond big campaigns like tankers) are widespread and can move voters. The 2017 election is a first test.
$70,000.00
2016

Reconciliation Canada - New Way Forward

Reconciliation Canada is engaging Canadians in reconciliation through experiential transformative change processes delivered by the following: Reconciliation Dialogue Workshops & Action Plans Targeted at community and organizational leaders, these workshops provide the opportunity for participants to engage in meaningful dialogue, build relationships and develop reconciliation action plans. Workshops will include a youth specific stream. Leadership Training & Core Competencies Assessment - Targeted to existing and emerging youth, community and organization leaders to develop reconciliation values-based leadership skills. In conjunction Reconciliation Canada will assist organizations with assessments of core reconciliation competencies and development of roadmaps to guide reconciliation initiatives. Sustainable Economic Reconciliation Dialogue & Action Plans - Workshops focused on economic reconciliation bring together stakeholders for creative dialogue to build meaningful partnerships and the co-development of Sustainable Economic Reconciliation Action Plans.
$70,000.00
2014

Reel Youth

Started in 2004, Reel Youth is a Vancouver-based media empowerment program supporting youth to create and distribute films about their visions for a more just and sustainable world. Reel Youth works in partnership with other youth-serving organizations to facilitate mobile stop-motion animation, video production, photography and music video programs that empower young people with economic, social, or geographic barriers to create their own media, engage communities, and play a meaningful role in inspiring positive change. These messages are shared through community screenings, online distribution platforms, and as part of the youth-juried touring Reel Youth Film Festival (hereafter RYFF), a collection of youth-made shorts that celebrates and promotes youth film making. With the Vancouver Foundation's support over the next 3 years, the project will engage 1600 youth to produce 300+ issue based films, reaching an audience of 360,000 people through online, DVD and film fest distribution. The touring Reel Youth Film Fest will be screened over 120 times in communities across Canada.
$75,000.00
2013

Pacific Wild/Coastal Connections-Virtual Rainforest Initiative

Coastal Connections- Virtual Rainforest Initiative (CC-VRI) is an educational program focused on utilizing new technology, experiential learning and locally-relevant resources connect youth in place-based communities to with the lands and waters of their traditional territories. Piloted in the coastal First Nations communities of Bella Bella and Hartley Bay, the program uses interactive white boards, remote wildlife webcams, and outdoor natural history training to bring ecology and conservation to life and to cultivate a new generation of stewards and natural resource managers in the Great Bear Rainforest. This collaborative effort between Pacific Wild, local community groups such as QQS Projects and the Gitga'at Land and Resources Stewardship Society, the Bella Bella and Hartley Bay community schools, along with the American Museum of Natural History and the Nature Conservancy, strives to develop an educational model that will provide youth with the passion and skills needed to pursue education and employment opportunities in science and conservation for years to come.
$70,000.00
2011

Umoja Operation Compassion Society of BC

Reaching out to African Immigrant and Refugee Families and Youth

Umoja's Literacy and Life-Skills program that has been running successfully for three years. The program has been designed to address the specific needs of immigrants and refugees from war-torn countries. Our most recent survey indicates that 100% of the participants are satisfied with the program and have reported that the program has met their literacy and life skills needs and has helped them adapt to their new country. So far more than 100 immigrants have participated in the program. Our intention is to continue to offer this vital program and also extend it to the youth. The project has two components to it: (A) The Literacy: English reading, writing, conversation and numeracy. For the youth, we will add the homework assistance component. Participants will attend Literacy/homework program 3 times a week from 4:30-6:30pm. (B) Life Skills: Once a week 6-8pm the project will build Canadian life and leadership skills to integrate successfully into the society through workshops, speakers and out trips.
$70,000.00
2010

University of British Columbia

Communicating the Case for A New Deal for Families: Phase 2

This project builds on an existing partnership between the Vancouver Foundation, the UBC Human Early Learning Partnership, the United Way of the Lower Mainland and the YWCA of Metro Vancouver. The project aims to transform research into action to address many of the time, income, service and environmental challenges that confront Vancouver families with young children in all their diversity. Previous research shows that the standard of living for the generation raising young children has deteriorated significantly. The same research reveals that public policy has been slow to adapt. This is a bad deal for families. In the absence of policy adaption, over 30 per cent of local children start school vulnerable. Early vulnerability compromises childhood, and has adverse consequences for children’s future school achievement, health, risk of incarceration, and employment success. There is now compelling research to move from a bad deal to a New Deal for Families, including local, national and global evidence about the required policy changes. (see full document for details).
$75,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia - Faculty of Medicine

Understanding smoking cessation behaviour in Vancouver's Chinese Communities (Dr. Mark Fitzgerald/Ms. Eliza Chang)

For numerous reasons, minority and immigrant communities in Canada may be at greater risk of smoking-related illnesses. This is particularly true among immigrants from Mandarin and Cantonese-speaking communities, where smoking rates remain disproportionately high. To date, millions have been spent on developing smoking cessation interventions, but their effectiveness in diverse cultural communities has been limited, likely because of a variety of social and cultural factors. Through a series of recent focus groups, representatives of Vancouver's Chinese communities have expressed a need for more culturally sensitive strategies to support smoking cessation in their community. We plan to address this need by using community-based participatory approaches to generate new knowledge about why smokers in Vancouver's Chinese communities continue to smoke and what their smoking cessation needs are. Our study will apply a community-academia coalition model, in which a Community Advisory Council (CAC) comprising of representatives from the Chinese community including smokers and non smokers, community key-informants (well-known socially influential/ respected individuals from the Mandarin-speaking and Cantonese-speaking communities), professional groups, and knowledge-users will oversee the project. Our findings will inform the creation of community-driven culturally appropriate resources aimed at reducing smoking rates (and therefore chronic lung & heart diseases) in these communities Research Team: Milan Khara, Tobacco Dependence Clinic; Iraj Poureslami, UBC; Stephem Lam, Lung Tumour Group; Maylene Fong, Evergreen; Ka Wai Cheung, UBC; Farzaneh Osati, Canadian Multicultural Health Promotion Society
$75,000.00
2012

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