Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

Fostering Health & Human Rights: A Medical Legal Pilot Study (Judith Lynam, UBC/Kate Hodgon, Network of Inner City Community Services Society)

Our broad concern is to generate insights to foster child and family health equity. We are proposing to undertake research to to examine the ways structural violence operates in the day to day lives of children, youth & families living with marked social and material adversity in Vancouver's inner city. We propose to illustrate the impact of structural violence on health, child development & community well being and to use this analysis to inform the design of a Medical Legal Partnership (MLP). Structural violence refers to 'social structures-economic, political, legal...that stop individuals, groups and societies from reaching their full potential. The idea of structural violence is linked very closely to social injustice and the social machiner of oppression' (Farmer et al, 2004, 2006a,b). 'MLPs integrate legal services as a vital component of the healthcare team. Through direct service, transforming institutions and influencing policy change, MLPs address the non-medical, social determinants of health that have legal remedies' (MLP website). As such, this approach may assist the target community to address the systemic issues that contribute to the poor health profile of children and families. The research will provide the baseline data for an evidence-based approach for addressing structural violence and will inform the development of a strategy, a plan and a financial model. Research Team: Anthony Boardman, UBC Christine Loock, UBC; Lorine Scott, BC Children's Hospital;, Ronald G. Friesen, Continueing Legal Educaiton Society of BC; John Simpson, Legal Services Society
$71,257.00
2012

University of Victoria School of Social Work

Engaged research on implementations in response to overdose

This current proposal builds on a Vancouver Foundation Develop Grant (UNR15-0134) held by Wallace (with Pauly) in which we were immersed in community when drug overdose become a public health crisis and our results informing responses. Also, a NSERC Engage grant supported a unique partnership and the creation of a spectrometer drug testing instrument by the Co-investigator (Hore) with Vincent at STS Pharmacy. The advancement is novel due to the cost-effectiveness of the invention which allows for unprecedented scale-up and integration. Most recently, Wallace, Hore and Vincent were successful in an application to the Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy’s Innovation program to implement this technology, pilot drug checking and build capacity in Victoria BC. Our proposal pairs the piloting of this innovation in drug checking with community-based research through the partnership with AIDS Vancouver Island and its Street College program. Specifically, we will engage people who use drugs (PWUD) in research that can inform how drug checking can effectively be implemented and integrated in harm reduction. There is a lack of knowledge on many aspects of implementation such as; who may use or not use such services, what barriers exist to using the services, how individuals will respond to test results, how drug checking could impact the toxic illicit drug market, what opportunities drug checking may hold for reducing stigma, increasing access to supports, and develop relationships.
$70,000.00
2017

UVIC - School of Public Health & Social Policy

Reflecting Back, Looking Forward: Storytelling to Address HIV/AIDS Across British Columbia

HIV/AIDS persists despite advancements in HIV treatment and prevention due to persistent social inequities and stigma. In the early response to HIV/AIDS, affected communities banded together in fierce activism. Now, the earliest generation of HIV/AIDS survivors and their allies are passing away due to older age and suicide. We are loosing their stories and memories, which embody community resilience. Our novel community-based participatory oral history research project will document the experiences of these early HIV/AIDS survivors in a digital archive in order to preserve and share their cultural memories inter-generationally, re-invigorate prevention, and help eradicate HIV/AIDS in BC.
$75,000.00
2017

Vancity Community Foundation

Code Red: Testing a “CARP” approach to B.C.’s affordability crisis

Political systems respond to those who organize and show up – at the ballot box and in between elections. While aging Canadians have long had umbrella advocacy groups persistently advancing their interests, younger Canadians have not. Our "CARP for younger Canada" approach tests what we can achieve by filling that gap. We'll influence systemic change via 4 key levers: How we act - we'll engage younger British Columbians in non-partisan, evidence-based political organizing. Our public Code Red campaign will be a catalyst. Beliefs – along the way we'll tackle the belief that younger people are entitled, lazy, etc. (i.e. individually at-fault) and replace it with a belief that society is holding us back by failing to invest in us; via earned media, extensive community presentations, and our website, social and email channels. Resource flows – we'll channel the above to spur increased public investment in younger Canadians, guided by an annual analysis. Laws & policies – we'll mobilize support for policies that ease the squeeze, e.g. adequately funded universal child care, extended parental leave, housing market reform and investments. * * Rather than inflexibly committing to a SINGLE policy, we seek opportunities to advance whatever evidence-based policies have in-the-moment traction WITHIN our realm of research & expertise on the social determinants of health. This project has a clear emphasis on housing and family/affordability policy.
$75,000.00
2016

Vancouver Association for Photographic Arts

Flash Forward Incubator Program

Presenting a new model for arts education and support, the Flash Forward Incubator Program provides a solution to secondary school art programming problems: a lack or shortage of funding for arts education and no access to working artists as mentors. As an extension of high school arts programming and working with the goals of school curriculums, Incubator is distinct in that it bridges work completed within high school settings with the professional world, facilitating meaningful contemporary art experiences and mentorships for students, and establishing an essential and supportive creative community for emerging artists within the high school setting and beyond.
$70,200.00
2018

Vancouver Symphony Society

U.S. West Coast Tour

The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra has been invited to undertake a tour of the U.S. West Coast in January/February 2013. The invitation was extended by Columbia Artists Management (CAMI), one of the world's most experienced and prestigious classical music artist management firms. Interest from presenters has been high, and the tour will consist of 8 concerts taking place in Seattle, Las Vegas, Santa Barbara, Northridge and Alisa Viejo (suburbs of Los Angeles), Palm Desert, Scottsdale and Tucson. Our Music Director, Bramwell Tovey, will conduct all concerts and the piano soloist will be world-renowned Vancouverite Jon Kimura Parker. The program will include a new work the VSO has commissioned from Edward Top, our Composer-In-Residence, entitled 'Totem' (a reflection on First Nations themes), the Grieg Piano Concerto and Prokofiev Symphony No. 5. The VSO has a long history of touring and most recently toured Central Canada in 2009 with concerts in Ottawa, Toronto, Montreal and Quebec City and Asia - Korea, Macau and China in 2008. It last toured the U.S. West Coast in 1978
$75,000.00
2012

Victoria Women's Transition House

Stepping Stones for Families: Ready to Rent

The Stepping Stones Steering Committee of 11 agencies developed a program for families who cannot find, keep and/or maintain housing. Many of these families have poor housing references and are not accepted into even the most basic of housing units. This program offers a 12-hour course called Ready to Rent that prepares families to be good tenants and provides support for up to six months to the families. They are seeking funding to stabilize the program, which started a year and a half ago, and also to develop a business plan, do a cost-benefit analysis and create a strong governance model.
$70,000.00
2010

Watari Research Association

Transition to Independence Program - TIP II

$70,000.00
2012

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