Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Boys and Girls Clubs of South Coast BC

Pre-Teen Nights

Pre-Teen Nights will offer evening pre-teen drop-in programs in seven locations which will integrate social activities with discussions and themes related to participants’ needs. Participants determine both the social activities as well as discussions. Trained staff provide mentorship and support to make a safe environment where participants feel comfortable to raise issues that are affecting their lives.
$85,000.00
2011

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Strengthening Youth and Community Engagement in Poverty Reduction

The proposed project is an innovative and sustainable 3-year plan to reconnect with communities across the province through expanding our outreach and community engagement activities, and strengthening our youth engagement and youth leadership initiatives. Regardless of the outcome of the upcoming provincial election, we will need to re-establish the call for a bold and comprehensive poverty reduction plan and we aim to do this through meaningful community engagement in order to strengthen existing relationships and form new ones. This will revitalize the poverty reduction plan as a community-driven call to action. We will continue to provide support for youth in low-income families and their allies to be a driving force in this call. We will provide mentorship and resources to high-school youth to be involved in the Coalition's outreach strategy and community engagement so that youth ideas and perspectives are always at the heart of what we do, and support them in taking leadership roles in organizing in their schools and communities to raise awareness about the issues of poverty.
$90,000.00
2013

Water, the Environment and Economy and BC's Liquefied Natural Gas Plans

The provincial government says that big increases in natural gas production will boost employment and GDP, and can eliminate the provincial debt and channel billions of dollars more into healthcare programs. But how realistic are the government's economic projections? What would such an upswing mean for critical resources such as water? What does this strategy mean for BC’s GHG emission targets? And what might the alternatives to a strategy based on massive increases in gas-drilling and gas exports be? This project would bring much-needed focus to these questions by: conducting a full “cradle-to-grave” analysis of an expanded natural gas industry's impacts on freshwater resources; analysing and critiquing the economic assumptions underlying current export plans; proposing an alternative, made-in-BC gas plan that strategically uses our natural gas endowment to transition to a clean energy future; and providing a template for meaningful pre-development planning of gas projects so that the needs of First Nations and rural communities directly affected by gas developments are met.
$90,000.00
2013

Canadian Mental Health Association - Kelowna & District Branch

Connected by 25

Connected by 25 is an innovative, cross-sectoral project that addresses the needs of young people between the ages of 16 and 24 in the Central Okanagan vulnerable in their transition to adulthood. Feedback from young people and community stakeholders identified both the need and rationale for the project, and a CAI service innovation grant allowed a two year pilot of Connected by 25 to start in early 2012. The project builds capacity within the community to ensure that young people at risk of falling through the cracks in their transition to adulthood have access to the services they require. It further serves to build capacity in youth themselves by offering the relational, emotional, and material supports they need. The project incorporates a dedicated part-time community capacity coordinator, who works with community based organizations to enhance collaboration, and identify and address systemic barriers. Concurrently, a full-time youth navigator provides directs supports and assistance to navigate complex systems, build connections and achieve success in their lives.
$80,000.00
2012

Meals Matter

Meals Matter - to provide low income individuals with the means to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Also supports low-intensity part-time staffing positions to people living with mental illness.
$90,000.00
2010

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss

There is a lack of skills training and support for Canadians who are blind or partially sighted and the result is that 65 percent of working age adults with vision loss are unemployed and 50 percent earn less than $20,000 per year. CNIB's innovative Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss will support young adults at this critical stage in their lives and prepare them with the skills and confidence they need to earn a living and maintain a job. Through interaction with others experiencing the same struggles and situations this pilot project will building acceptance of vision loss through the discovery of adaptive methods, accessibility options, independent living skills and practical skills such as interview techniques and resume writing. These groups will empower young adults with vision loss by arming them with essential tools and skills. Together, participants will explore and discuss topics related to education, transitioning into the working world, assistive technology to achieve independence, social interaction, family life and more.
$90,000.00
2014

Coast Mental Health Foundation

Low Barrier Employment for People with Mental Illness

For the past 30 years, Coast Mental Health has operated supported employment programs for people with severe mental illness. We have observed the difficulty people with severe mental illness have in returning to work due to the symptoms of their illness, their medication and their lack of confidence. Coast has seen that opportunities to work need to have structured expectations but offer the client flexibility, time to practice good work skills and to become accustomed to working. In 2009,Coast had the opportunity to develop a new low barrier employment program, the” Street Cleaning Crew” with funding from the City of Vancouver. The project hires and trains people with mental illness in skills required to clean community sidewalks, gutters and alleys of refuse and debris. The workers are supported by Peer Support Workers and supervised on the job by project staff until they regain their independent work skills. Once they reach that point the clients are encourage to find other paid employment if that is appropriate for their health.
$90,000.00
2012

College of New Caledonia

Vanderhoof Youth Centre

The Youth Centre is an unexpected outcome of the Vanderhoof Diversity Project’s Neighbourhood Space (NS). Youth started frequenting the space and in 2011, as requested by members of the community, CNC pursued funding to formalize the Youth Centre. Several of the youth who frequent the centre have extremely high needs and little to no formal support. There are equal amounts of First Nations and non First Nations that use the NS. It is a very diverse atmosphere - youth at risk form a large part of the cross section. Our funding request is to hire a part time Youth Development Coordinator (YDC) to assist the existing Youth Support Worker (YSW) and to assist with covering other admin costs (see budget). The YSW, also a part time position, provides a social or holistic support role for youth as well as being responsible for various administrative functions leaving little time to expand youth programming. In order to fill the gap of much needed program development and coordination, the new YDC’s role will be to work with the youth to develop programs, training, and activities for youth.
$90,000.00
2012

Collingwood Neighbourhood House Society

Renfrew -Collingwood: Intercultural Circles of Connection and Engagement

To work with outreach connectors in the neighbourhood (which has been a successful approach in first engaging marginalized groups)to expand their capacity to work interculturally and bridge relations between peer-based groups, resulting in a more unified, interconnected, engaged neighbourhood. The project structure includes four intersecting circles that will ripple out to achieve collective connections, engagement and inter-relational impacts. Connectors Circle: Peer-based connectors will be linked to share and broaden intercultural practice and expand their relations outside their peer groups.Community Partners Circle: Interconnected neighbourhood partners will learn, adjust policy and practice to encourage intercultural connections. Communications Circle: Diverse citizens and neighbourhood workers will develop communication tools and share stories and strategies to support the intercultural connections. Knowledge Exchange Circle: conducts evaluations, shares theory and practices, delivers capacity building activities to help evolve diverse interactions and engagement.
$90,000.00
2014

SAFE (Sex work Awareness for Everyone) in Collingwood and Beyond

Our project will further address the health and safety needs of sex trade workers (STWs) working along the Kingsway stroll and will build on the success of the SAFE in Collingwood Outreach Program. We will expand outreach to include the Kingsway stroll between Boundary and Fraser Street where a need has been identified. We will develop and pilot a telephone counselling support service as there are currently no support services for STWs in Vancouver outside of the Downtown Eastside (DTES). We will also work with the East Van. youth clinic to pilot this service as most of the women working along Kingsway are youth. We will explore with Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) and the BC Centre for Disease Control the provision of accessible street-level health services. We will work with and support another neighbourhood in addressing the health and safety of STWs, businesses and residents in their neighbourhood. SAFE developed tools, resources and a successful community development approach. The SAFE Steering Committee members are committed to sharing their experience and learnings.
$90,000.00
2013

David Suzuki Foundation

Protecting the Peace: Enhancing Local Voices in the Greater Peace Break Region

The Peace Break Region supports agriculture and diverse wildlife, including threatened populations of bull trout, grizzly, fisher, and woodland caribou. The region has been severely degraded by logging, mining, oil and gas development and earlier large-scale hydro development. The region's lowlands are dominated by seismic lines, fracking operations, roads, pipeline crossings and other industrial infrastructure that seriously threaten the region's critical ecosystem services that regulate climate, disease outbreaks, and wastes, and that provide aesthetic, recreational and spiritual value. Unfortunately, the true worth of the region's natural capital is often poorly understood by policy-makers. For this reason the DSF and its partner West Moberly FN are proposing to complete a full natural capital valuation that will inventory and enumerate, in dollar terms, the non-market wealth of the region. This research will be accompanied by online mapping and other public engagement tools that will communicate the importance of natural capital to sustaining communities in the north.
$80,000.00
2012

Fair Mining Collaborative

Transboundary watershed protection: building relationships, better laws and public awareness

Our work centers on creating strong, respectful relationships between BC First Nations, Alaska Tribes, and NGO’s on both sides of the border to collaboratively change antiquated ineffective mining laws and policy. Knowledge is power. FMC will provide our proven education program to the CTC, including; Fair Mining Practices: A New Mining Code for British Columbia (FMPC), Mine Medicine Manual (MMM), Fair Mining Training Program (FMTP), and the Northern Secwepemc Tribal Council (NSTC) Mining Policy. Many BC communities already use FMC’s products to increase their understanding of the mining regulatory system, and leverage change through shared decision-making and implementation of innovative best management practices that protect their interests. Very diverse users of FMC’s education program, (Amnesty International to the Tsilhqot’in National Government to Argentinian filmmaker Hernan Vilchez to mining industry organizations), have successfully changed conflicted relationships and made effective changes in regulatory systems. Forward thinking mining companies are recognizing First Nations as decision-making equals, knowing their projects must receive a social license from all affected communities, or the economic viability of their project will be jeopardized. Our work proves that sharing effective tools with the most affected groups, can change the status quo rapidly from the ground up, leaving legislators and recalcitrant industry to catch up.
$80,000.00
2016

First Nations Schools Association

Indian Residential Schools and Reconciliation Teacher Resource Guides

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommended “provincial and territorial departments of education work in concert with the Commission to develop age-appropriate educational materials about residential schools for use in public schools.” Too few Canadians are aware of this aspect of our collective history. According to the 2010 Urban Aboriginal Peoples survey, less than half of non-Aboriginal people have heard of residential schools. Knowledge about residential school history has relevance for all Canadians. We aim to support teachers who wish to teach about the history of residential schools and reconciliation by producing high quality, age appropriate, classroom ready and BC focused instructional and professional development materials. These materials seek to fill a gap as there is currently a lack of BC focused materials at all levels as well as a lack of age appropriate materials for teaching about residential schools at the elementary level.
$90,000.00
2014

Grizzly Bear Foundation

Strategies for Human-Grizzly Coexistence and Conflict Reduction in Rural BC (“COEXIST”)

Strategies for Human-Grizzly Coexistence and Conflict Reduction in Rural BC (“COEXIST”) will address the increase in human-grizzly conflict resulting in unsafe situations for both humans and bears. COEXIST will catalyze on-the-ground action by enhancing the knowledge and resources available to local governments, First Nations, the forestry industry, and the public to promote coexistence. COEXIST provides solutions to current wildlife management shortcomings, reducing conflict costs to bears and communities, and in turn creating local economic development opportunities.
$83,000.00
2017

Home Is Where We Live Lifecycles Project Society

LifeCycles' Fruit Tree Project: Harvesting Abundance in the Urban Orchard

Working with key members of our network we will reflexively asses, develop, design, implement and evaluate communication materials and food literacy programs that can be delivered in public spaces with support from social service agencies. These programs will provide skills and knowledge to help people engage as co-producers in the local food system. Program will be open to all, but targeted at those who are marginalized and living with food insecurity. Communications and programs will aim to promote a cultural shift from consumption to co-production, aiming to deepen participant's desire to participate as active agents in a healthy, sustainable food system. Collectively our choices can bring great change to how food is cultivated and produced. Much is made about the price of food, and cost is often cited as a primary barrier for healthier options. Our project challenges people to think deeper about food, to see beyond a consumer product to a local resource that requires collective stewardship and care to keep healthy. By shifting this attitude, we support more local food production and create the conditions for an equitable local food economy to thrive. Together we will begin to explore what a healthier, tastier and more responsible diet means in our region. With more aware and informed consumers - or rather co-producers - our food system is more motivated to work using techniques that safeguard food diversity, the environment and quality.
$90,000.00
2016

Hope in Shadows Inc.

Developing the Hope in Shadows and Megaphone Vendor Program

This project will substantially develop the Hope in Shadows and Megaphone vendor program by expanding its reach while filling gaps in the support and training that vendors receive. The project's objectives - to increase vendors' sales and the number of active Megaphone vendors, to help vendors build their skills and to provide them with meaningful social connections - were developed after consulting with vendors and staff from successful North American street newspapers. This project will achieve its objectives through hiring a full-time vendor coordinator who will organize training workshops, team-building events and meetings for vendors. In addition to these group activities the coordinator will support and encourage vendors through field visits and individual check-ins. The co-ordinator will also do outreach to make vendor opportunities accessible to homeless and low-income people while building support for vendors among residential and business communities. This project will allow for the continuation of a Vendor Advisory Board, which had a successful three month trail in 2011.
$80,000.00
2012

Il Centro

East Van Green

Over the past year Il Centro has developed several new "food system initiatives", specifically an Italian Market (Farmers' Market), a new Community Garden and an active food security education program in partnership with Fresh Roots Urban Farm and Slow Food Vancouver. The East Van Green initiative will build upon, and connect our existing food system activities through a "zero waste" project that will utilize a state of art food "composter" and turn our organic waste into compost which in turn will be used for our community garden and Fresh Root's urban farm located at Vancouver Technical High School-across the street from il Centro. In partnership with a local recycling company (Recycling Alternative) we will establish a closed loop demonstration project that will take organic waste from our garden, catering facilities, restaurant, and the urban farm, (located at Vancouver Technical High School), and turn it into compost for local usage. By linking our community garden, catering/food services, farmers' market, and our partner's local urban farm we hope to create a food system demonstration hub that will engage, educate and promote urban sustainability, local food production, access to local food, and organic waste management. The zero waste project will, we believe, create a micro-community demonstration model that can be replicated and utilized across the city.
$90,000.00
2015

Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia

MY Circle Transitions: Enhanced Newcomer Leadership Training

This project will develop and deliver 8-10 training modules for immigrant and refugee youth leaders in areas youth have identified including conflict resolution skills, LGBTQ/migrant identities, migration, multiculturalism and indigenous perspectives. Curriculum will be developed in the first year and delivered, evaluated and fine tuned in the second and third years, with a target of training 40 newcomer youth.
$90,000.00
2011

Kindale Developmental Association

Employment Readiness for Youth and Young Adults

Kindale's project will assist youth and young adults with developmental disabilities to gain the skills, habits, attitudes, and experiences necessary to become employed in real jobs in their local community. The program is individualized based on the development of a personal employment plan for each of the 20 participants, focused on their abilities, needs, and goals. It includes employment skills assessment, training, coaching, on-the-job support, and reinforcement of the learned skills and habits at home. The project also works with local businesses to provide job-specific training and employment opportunities for the participants. Program staff work with employers and their employees to allay fears, raise awareness, and foster relationship building. On-the-job support is provided as needed by the program participant, employer, or their employees. This direct linking of personal employment planning, employment readiness training, job specific skills coaching, and employer development makes this project different from, and closes gaps in, services for this population.
$90,000.00
2014

Lu'ma Native Housing Society

Aboriginal Youth Mentorship & Housing program

Our Society plans to provide an Aboriginal Youth Mentorship & Housing program to support 30-50 youth annually, aged 16-24 who are transitioning from foster care to adulthood. This figure includes 15-20 youth who we currently house plus youth living elsewhere for whom we will provide outreach for. The program will provide an Aboriginal mentor, Mentor Assistant, & Housing Navigator to engage our youth in activities that will better guide their development of becoming a productive citizen with a strong cultural identity who is a good tenant and neighbour. We will adopt the Jim Casey Initiative to help our youth set up an Aboriginal Youth Board so they can become effective self-advocates. We will bring Lu'ma's existing community partners to create a Community Partnership Board. The two Boards will develop resources, opportunities & advocate for changes in services & public policy. Implementing the Jim Casey Initiative, we will offer our youth an 'Opportunity Passport' to open doors to financial planning, asset building & employment.
$85,000.00
2013

Made in BC - Dance on Tour Dance Society

MiBC Province-Wide Community Engaged Programs - 3 year plan

Based on the success, lessons learned and direct feedback from our partners from the Northern BC 2013-14 Community-Engaged Dance Residencies Project, MiBC’s Province-Wide Community-Engaged Dance Residency Program plans to grow engagement with remote and underserved BC communities through extended dance residencies. The Program pairs professional dance artists with local community members for intensive periods of workshops and collaboration. Dance artists will be supported to expand their skills in community-engaged work through mentorship, training and peer sharing. Key to successful community participation are the Community Engagement Facilitators, regional champions who connect dance artists with the local community. This program will serve rural and urban participants, rural presenters and BC-based dance artists. The Program will focus on three BC Regions over three years: Southern Interior, Coastal/Island and Northern Communities. Partnering with regional presenters, the Program will support dance artists to delve deeper into community-engaged practice. Projects include: - Joe Ink Move It! Multi-generational workshops - 3 year multi-region - All Bodies Dance Project – Engaging mixed ability community & training/mentoring dance artists-3 year, lower mainland & Vancouver Island - MACHiNENOiSY - Queer Youth Program - Kelowna - Co. Erasga Dance - Diversity through dance -Northern region - Dancers of Damalahamid – First Nations residency – Moricetown/Smithers
$89,000.00
2015

Nelson CARES Society

Moving Together Phase III: Implementing a Transporation Action Plan for Kootenay Boundary Seniors

Moving Together Phases I & II: A Collaborative Approach to Addressing Seniors’ Transportation Barriers (2014, funded by Vancouver Foundation) identified specific transportation service gaps and barriers. A project Working Group of local stakeholders including local/regional transit managers, seniors, community services, and regional/municipal government developed solutions in three categories: Transit, Interior Health/Community Transportation Services, and Public Education & Marketing. The recommendations were presented to a larger regional-provincial stakeholder group that worked together to identify challenges and opportunities for implementation. The most promising recommendations emerging from this gathering were formulated into an Action Plan. Moving Together Phase III: Implementing a Transportation Action Plan for Kootenay Boundary Seniors, will operationalize the Action Plan in two segments: 1) A Transportation Animator position to connect seniors to appropriate transportation services, raise community awareness of seniors transportation challenges (including health professionals and community services providers), and promote collaboration among transportation providers; and, 2) Policy, Practice & Project Development to further develop and/or implement the remaining recommendations through participation in wider transportation initiatives with partner groups, i.e. the West Kootenay Transit Committee, City of Nelson, and Interior Health (IH).
$85,000.00
2015

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Vancouver Rent Bank

NICCSS is proposing a Vancouver Rent Bank Loan Fund with an initial 3-year mandate. This fund will build on the existing supports available in neighbourhoods in Vancouver with a high proportion of renters, and complement the City of Vancouver's Housing and Homelessness Strategy (2012- 2021) and the work of the StreetoHome Foundation. The fund will gain from the experience of existing Rent Banks in British Columbia, including NICCSS existing iRENT Bank program that is already being offered to families in the DTES, Strathcona and Hastings Corridor area of Vancouver. The Vancouver Rent Bank will allow low-income residents across the City, who are in temporary financial crisis and about to lose their housing, to access interest free emergency loans to address rent shortfalls and utilities arrears and deposits thus preventing their eviction. The Vancouver Rent Bank will provide financial literacy education (with VanCity Foundation) and connections to a network of neighbourhood agency partners that can support loan recipients based on their current needs and ensure continuity of support.
$90,000.00
2012

Parachute Leaders in Injury Prevention

The Way Forward: Strengthening Injury Prevention Efforts in B.C.

Our proposal to strengthen and support injury prevention efforts in BC, involves a focused engagement strategy that leverages both Parachute networks and the extensive networks of our lead B.C. partners: the BC Injury Research and Prevention Unit (BCIRPU); and the Community Against Preventable Injuries (Preventable). Through our partnership with BCIRPU and their role as the secretariat for the BC Injury Prevention Leadership and Action Network (BCiPLAN), we will work together to hire a Community Mobilizer to "connect the dots" and leverage new and existing efforts with a focus on our priority areas of Motor Vehicle Collisions (MVCs) and sports and recreation injuries. Working collaboratively, we will reduce injury through targeted, grass-roots, local approaches -- leveraging networks and activities from our B.C. partners and Parachute. With a strategic infusion of funding over two years from the Vancouver Foundation, we will implement a long-term, sustainable plan to reduce injury rates in B.C. that involves co-creative partnerships with less duplication and increased collaboration.
$82,000.00
2014

Penticton & District Community Resources Society

Community Hubs Expansion

PDCRS would like to expand the Hubs in the South Okanagan. These “one-stop shop” Hubs are for families struggling with literacy, emotional, physical or other barriers to promote increased awareness and accessibility to services that support healthy early childhood development for all families regardless of vulnerability. Rather than having to guess who to call or where to go, they can meet face to face with a facilitator to get information and help with accessing the right services. We will meet with families where they live and work to find the best times to connect and the best ways to ensure that families feel comfortable starting the conversation. The hub will also be available in the evenings for parenting programs. In 2008, the United Way of Canada commissioned an environmental scan of early childhood development initiatives and concluded that there is “widespread consensus in Canada that hub models are an optimum approach for the provision of ECD services.” And hubs located in schools are the “single most effective intervention geared to children, youth & their families.”
$90,000.00
2013

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