Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Home Is Where We Live Lifecycles Project Society

LifeCycles' Fruit Tree Project: Harvesting Abundance in the Urban Orchard

Working with key members of our network we will reflexively asses, develop, design, implement and evaluate communication materials and food literacy programs that can be delivered in public spaces with support from social service agencies. These programs will provide skills and knowledge to help people engage as co-producers in the local food system. Program will be open to all, but targeted at those who are marginalized and living with food insecurity. Communications and programs will aim to promote a cultural shift from consumption to co-production, aiming to deepen participant's desire to participate as active agents in a healthy, sustainable food system. Collectively our choices can bring great change to how food is cultivated and produced. Much is made about the price of food, and cost is often cited as a primary barrier for healthier options. Our project challenges people to think deeper about food, to see beyond a consumer product to a local resource that requires collective stewardship and care to keep healthy. By shifting this attitude, we support more local food production and create the conditions for an equitable local food economy to thrive. Together we will begin to explore what a healthier, tastier and more responsible diet means in our region. With more aware and informed consumers - or rather co-producers - our food system is more motivated to work using techniques that safeguard food diversity, the environment and quality.
$90,000.00
2016

Il Centro

East Van Green

Over the past year Il Centro has developed several new "food system initiatives", specifically an Italian Market (Farmers' Market), a new Community Garden and an active food security education program in partnership with Fresh Roots Urban Farm and Slow Food Vancouver. The East Van Green initiative will build upon, and connect our existing food system activities through a "zero waste" project that will utilize a state of art food "composter" and turn our organic waste into compost which in turn will be used for our community garden and Fresh Root's urban farm located at Vancouver Technical High School-across the street from il Centro. In partnership with a local recycling company (Recycling Alternative) we will establish a closed loop demonstration project that will take organic waste from our garden, catering facilities, restaurant, and the urban farm, (located at Vancouver Technical High School), and turn it into compost for local usage. By linking our community garden, catering/food services, farmers' market, and our partner's local urban farm we hope to create a food system demonstration hub that will engage, educate and promote urban sustainability, local food production, access to local food, and organic waste management. The zero waste project will, we believe, create a micro-community demonstration model that can be replicated and utilized across the city.
$90,000.00
2015

Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia

MY Circle Transitions: Enhanced Newcomer Leadership Training

This project will develop and deliver 8-10 training modules for immigrant and refugee youth leaders in areas youth have identified including conflict resolution skills, LGBTQ/migrant identities, migration, multiculturalism and indigenous perspectives. Curriculum will be developed in the first year and delivered, evaluated and fine tuned in the second and third years, with a target of training 40 newcomer youth.
$90,000.00
2011

Indian Summer Arts Society

Taike: South Asian & Indigenous Artistic Collaborations

Indian Summer Festival's ‘Taike’ project is intended to bring together South Asian and Indigenous artists in meaningful collaborations and conversations. With our mission to create an inclusive, diverse and culturally-rich society, our curatorial practice is to center and amplify South Asian voices in conversation with other artistic communities. The addition of the Taike programming is to support solidarity between South Asian and Indigenous communities through the arts. Please visit www.indiansummerfest.ca for more background on the project and the word 'Taike'.
$90,000.00
2018

Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society

A Place of Belonging

Metis Nation British Columbia (MNBC), Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society (KAFS) and Lii Michif Otipemisiwak Family and Community Services (LMO) have collaborated on this joint project with the focus on providing innovative safe supportive housing for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth in Kamloops 19 - 24 yrs of age and who are/have transitioned out of care of the child welfare system or who are currently homeless. We will first address issues of cultural identity, sense of belonging and self-esteem by providing supportive living arrangements for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth. This grounds our Aboriginal youth in culture and spiritual support, while simultaneously providing a safe place to stay. The Youth will then be better equipped with tools to grow into productive young members of society, provided with distinctly individual pathways available to them. This unique housing arrangement will be a starting place for youth to develop life skills while learning healthy skills with positive strong paths forward. Aboriginal Youth are disconnected from their Communities and require a strong sense of security in ones-self, to successfully transition into functional young Aboriginal adults. Aboriginal Youth need to start at square one, which involves finding out who they are, what their culture is and what it means to them and having pride in their sense of identity.
$100,000.00
2015

Kindale Developmental Association

Employment Readiness for Youth and Young Adults

Kindale's project will assist youth and young adults with developmental disabilities to gain the skills, habits, attitudes, and experiences necessary to become employed in real jobs in their local community. The program is individualized based on the development of a personal employment plan for each of the 20 participants, focused on their abilities, needs, and goals. It includes employment skills assessment, training, coaching, on-the-job support, and reinforcement of the learned skills and habits at home. The project also works with local businesses to provide job-specific training and employment opportunities for the participants. Program staff work with employers and their employees to allay fears, raise awareness, and foster relationship building. On-the-job support is provided as needed by the program participant, employer, or their employees. This direct linking of personal employment planning, employment readiness training, job specific skills coaching, and employer development makes this project different from, and closes gaps in, services for this population.
$90,000.00
2014

Kinsight Community Society

Youth Employment Initiative

Years 2 & 3 of a 3 year project with a long range goal to expand community capacity to successfully engage youth who have developmental disabilities in sustainable, paid employment. It is intended to increase employment opportunities and the overall rate of employment for youth aged 15 - 19 in the TriCities. With the initiative successfully underway with 10 students at Heritage Woods Secondary in Port Moody, it is our intent to expand the project to the communities of Coquitlam and Port Coquitlam in years 2 & 3. This will be accomplished through supports to bridge Secondary students from school work experience placements into paid part or full time employment and by expanding the pool of employment opportunities in the TriCities through the recruitment & education of potential employers. A cross-sectoral steering committee will continue to evaluate and guide progress, ongoing viability and strategies for project expansion and improved connections to the business community. The 2nd and 3rd years allow us to check back with previous schools/communities to ensure project sustainability.
$95,791.16
2014

Lake Windermere Ambassadors Society

Citizen Science Series - Year 2 & 3

The era of climate imposed decisions regarding source water protection and water allocation for humans and the ecosystems upon which we depend, has arrived.  The Water Sustainability Act, a modernized Columbia River Treaty and localized watershed governance, will rely on accurate data, since water policy and data are inextricably intertwined. Community based monitoring includes open source, transparent, accessible, scientifically robust and indigenous relevant water data to inform decisions.  21st century challenges will require forging innovative, collaborative partnerships to collectively ensure economically and ecologically viable, climate resilient communities in Canada. 
$100,000.00
2017

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

Burnaby Youth Hub - Headspace Initiative

The Burnaby Youth Hub (“the Hub”) improves access to youth-centric services by offering a unique one-stop shop of services in a safe and empowering environment. In collaboration with a number of other partners, the Hub functions to provide young people with the opportunity and access to a comprehensive set of resources to foster a productive future as independent, engaged members of the community. In order to continue to provide innovative support that is responsive to the unique and varied needs of the young people in our community, the Hub will be launching a new framework of integrative care specifically addressing and de-stigmatizing mental health among youth. Modeled after the Australian Headspace initiative, this new approach will build off of existing foundations to better serve the needs of youth in Burnaby, as identified and articulated by the youth requiring and accessing these services. This innovative new framework will see greater focus on building holistic, compassionate, and inclusive services in a centralized design, structured around four core pillars: mental health, physical & sexual health, capacity-building (including education and employment skills), and advocacy. Under this new initiative, the voices and experiences of young people will be included throughout the process of program design and implementation, and the self-identified needs of youth in the community will drive the nature of the services provided at the Hub.
$100,000.00
2015

McCreary Centre Society

Youth Research Academy: Post majority research pilot

A shortage of longitudinal data exists about the challenges, supports and successes youth aging out of care experience. McCreary aims to use the expertise gathered by conducting surveys such as the BC AHS and Homeless and Street Involved Youth Survey (HSIYS), and longitudinal studies (e.g., 3-year evaluation following youth leaving PLEA) to support the YRA to develop and deliver a pilot study tracking youth as they age out of care. The YRA have been trained in survey development, data entry, analysis and dissemination. They have also been involved in focus groups and consultations with youth in and from government care. They will apply their developing research skills to this project. The project will follow established research ethics protocols for data collection and storage consistent with those used in other McCreary projects. Established protocols are also in place to ensure the secure handling of identifying information. Following youth and adult stakeholder consultations and with support from McCreary, TRRUST Collective Impact partners, and the YRA advisory committee, YRA members will develop a pilot study about the experiences of BC youth who age out of care. This post majority survey will canvass responses from youth approaching their 19th birthday and at two future time points (6 and 12 months). The YRA will be involved in all aspects of the project, from survey design to data analysis and dissemination.
$100,000.00
2017

Native Courtworker & Counselling Association of B.C.

Strengthening Aboriginal Women's Project

Strengthening Aboriginal Women’s Project hopes to facilitate an end to the "revolving door" of domestic abuse by securing a Case Worker who will offer specialized, culturally appropriate assistance that promotes independent living for 30 Aboriginal women annually. The Case Worker will advocate on her clients' behalf for systemic change within the community. Utilizing a Case Management Model with corresponding principles and ethics, and presented within an Aboriginal cultural context, this project will fill a gap in community services in Prince George by helping Aboriginal women navigate available systems of care in a manner that is mindful of historical and institutional barriers that often lead to trauma and instil a fear in these women that impact their ability to engage in those same systems of care. In order to effectively address the root causes of that fear, an emphasis will be placed on increasing the administrative and self-management tools required to have a successful outcome as well as on working with community stakeholders to address existing barriers to accessing care.
$91,000.00
2012

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Vancouver Rent Bank

NICCSS is proposing a Vancouver Rent Bank Loan Fund with an initial 3-year mandate. This fund will build on the existing supports available in neighbourhoods in Vancouver with a high proportion of renters, and complement the City of Vancouver's Housing and Homelessness Strategy (2012- 2021) and the work of the StreetoHome Foundation. The fund will gain from the experience of existing Rent Banks in British Columbia, including NICCSS existing iRENT Bank program that is already being offered to families in the DTES, Strathcona and Hastings Corridor area of Vancouver. The Vancouver Rent Bank will allow low-income residents across the City, who are in temporary financial crisis and about to lose their housing, to access interest free emergency loans to address rent shortfalls and utilities arrears and deposits thus preventing their eviction. The Vancouver Rent Bank will provide financial literacy education (with VanCity Foundation) and connections to a network of neighbourhood agency partners that can support loan recipients based on their current needs and ensure continuity of support.
$90,000.00
2012

Neworld Theatre Society

The Complicated Whole: Performing Inclusion Across Perceptions of Ability

Arguably much of the world is rooted in a history that excludes people with developmental disabilities. Often our culture focuses on what people are unable to do, as opposed to what they are good at. Three years of work between artists with and without developmental disabilities has shown us that, given the opportunity to collaborate equally with professionals, people with developmental disabilities are extraordinary artists, with extraordinary and specific strengths. This project showcases those strengths through the development of a performance ensemble, the production and tour of three shows, and dissemination of our creative model across the Lower Mainland, Canada and the US.
$96,250.00
2018

Options Community Services

Neighbourhood Based Family Connections in Surrey/White Rock

Within the context of the dramatic demographic growth of Surrey (and the exponential growth in families with young children and the diversity of these families) and the limited neighbourhood infrastructure (geographic distance and transit issues that impose barriers) to support these families, the project will provide enhanced supports and resources to families through the creation of family resource networks or hubs.
$100,000.00
2011

Penticton & District Community Resources Society

Community Hubs Expansion

PDCRS would like to expand the Hubs in the South Okanagan. These “one-stop shop” Hubs are for families struggling with literacy, emotional, physical or other barriers to promote increased awareness and accessibility to services that support healthy early childhood development for all families regardless of vulnerability. Rather than having to guess who to call or where to go, they can meet face to face with a facilitator to get information and help with accessing the right services. We will meet with families where they live and work to find the best times to connect and the best ways to ensure that families feel comfortable starting the conversation. The hub will also be available in the evenings for parenting programs. In 2008, the United Way of Canada commissioned an environmental scan of early childhood development initiatives and concluded that there is “widespread consensus in Canada that hub models are an optimum approach for the provision of ECD services.” And hubs located in schools are the “single most effective intervention geared to children, youth & their families.”
$90,000.00
2013

PHS Community Services Society

PHS Youth Research Iniative

Through the PHS Youth Housing First Project we became aware of the fact that the majority of youth in the DTES were exited prematurely from the foster care system and that the correlation between their drug use, homelessness, transition to IV drug use and the connection to a premature exit from care needed to be explored more extensively. For this new project we would like to assign a researcher and a youth research assistant to gather pertinent info using primary sites such as Insite, New Fountain Shelter, PHS housing sites for youth and our Overdose Prevention Sites to gather data, and disseminate the findings. The tools we would use are, surveys, qualitative interviews, internal age based confidential statistics from Insite, and other referral sites. The specific information we will be trying to extract is: which young people (who we come into contact with at these sites between 16-30) had involvement with the child welfare system, at which age they entered that system, what was the age and point of exit from the child welfare system, when the youth started using drugs, the correlation between drug use and insecure housing, and what the housing trajectory has been since.
$90,000.00
2017

Positive Living Society of British Columbia

Stigma and access to health information in certain marginalized HIV communities (Mr. R. Paul Kerston/Dr. Mario Brondani)

HIV stigma may prevent people from being timely diagnosed and engaging in life-saving care. It may also prevent those who are HIV positive from seeking health educational information and services, particularly if they are from marginalized communities. To minimize stigma and to engage HIV-positive individuals in utilizing educational and support services, we need a good understanding of the roots of stigma and of the resources these community members need. Stigma can have many forms and be manifested in different manners. Despite the advance of readily available information and media, stigma remains held by the lay public and experienced by HIV marginalized individuals from Aboriginal communities and those who are refugee/immigrants, as the focus of this proposal. Within a community-based participatory research framework (CBPR), this proposed 2-year project will explore inductively the roots of stigma as experienced by HIV-positive members from these two marginalized communities, gathered in group discussions, and as held by lay individuals from the general public who are HIV-negative, gathered individually. The focus groups will be peer-led by volunteer trainees. Through collaborative thematic analysis from group discussions and interviews, this CBPR will enable us to identify the factors contributing to stigma and the educational and service needs of these marginalized communities. It will also inform the development of strategies to address and minimize stigma.
$94,425.00
2012

Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre

MoreSports & YELL

Participants experience sport through introductory programs before, during and after school and as mini-sessions focused on physical activity and fun. MoreSports reduces traditional barriers to activity including the high cost of participation, transportation, lack of infrastructure or mistrust of the competitive sport system. The Youth Engage Leadership Learning (YELL) Program systematically develops youth leadership, creating qualified coaches and expanding programs to meet the demand for MoreSports.
$100,000.00
2010

Ready to Rent BC Association

Building Capacity through Education

Building Capacity through Education will build upon the recent Peers for Housing Stability initiative. Though Peers, R2R developed a youth-specific course and trained youth facilitators to co-facilitate 20 RentReady sessions in the Lower Mainland. Emerging feedback from community partners has indicated a demand for capacity building to deliver the training in-house, both the youth-specific RentReady course as well as the broader, certificate-backed RentSmart course. In speaking to youth, R2R has also identified the need to develop tools that address roommate living situations, often a requirement for affordability but legally in the grey zone and a source of many issues and conflicts. Finally, there is a need for increased awareness and expansion of the Ready to Rent model amoung landlords and housing providers in the Lower Mainland. The goals for Building Capacity are as follows: - to train community organizations in the Lower Mainland to become RentSmart and RentReady facilitators and be able to deliver the curriculum to their youth populations - to increase awareness of the RentSmart certificate amoung landlords and housing providers - to pilot and implement RentSmart within the public, alternative and aboriginal school systems - to develop tools, resources and supports to assist youth to identify and navigate successful roommate living situations
$100,000.00
2015

School District #43 - Coquitlam

Red Wolf Spirit Adventures

The Coquitlam School District Aboriginal Education (CSDAE) in partnership with Outward Bound Canada will facilitate together an outdoor education program that will balance adventure based learning with cultural teachings. Red Wolf Spirit Adventures will be facilitated in two separate programs; the Suwa'lkh Learning Centre (SLC) and the Aboriginal Youth Leadership Council (AYLC) The Suwa'lkh Learning Centre is hosted by SD#43 Aboriginal Education. The program is inclusive; however, Aboriginal students comprise approximately 98% of the 35 students attending this school. This program provides a more personalized learning environment for students. Youth at this school have typically had more personal challenges to overcome in their lives. The AYLC is comprised of Aboriginal students in grades 9 and 12 that are viewed as having positive leadership qualities. For the current school year we have 48 enrolled students in this programThe objective of this group is to continue developing their leadership skills through planning and hosting community events as a way of giving back.
$100,000.00
2013

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through A Different Lens

The two components of our project are to expand the number of teachers using innovative teaching and assessment practices which are allowing students to use their preferred method of demonstrating their learning; and to build the capacity of these teachers to assess the intended learning outcomes regardless of the methods students choose. Each of these components require four steps: 1) the introduction of teaching and assessment strategies to allow for alternate demonstrations of understanding in regular classroom practice, 2) The implementation of new instructional and assessment methods, which will involve coaching by the lead teachers as well as side-by-side teaching, 3) the evalution of the implementation process, and 4) the readjusting of instruction and assessments. Our project is currently being implemented with groups of teachers from 6 schools: 2 elementary (k-5), 2 middle (6-8) and 2 secondary (9-12). In Year 2, we would like to increase the number of teachers involved at each of these six schools, and if possible increase the number of schools.
$100,000.00
2012

SFU - Centre for Dialogue

CityStudio Vancouver: Education and Community Hub

Education and Training. We have a powerful learning community of students, alumni, faculty and administrators, City staff and elected leaders, and community builders. We need to deepen their collaborative learning experiences and impact by building and practicing the skills needed to respond to the big challenges that cities face. We are helping to create the workforce that our future cities need, today. We need to build new partnerships that reflect the full diversity of learning and action that happens in the city. Community Learning Hub. We need an interactive communications tool set and strategy to enable project development that results in creating higher quality projects that can be shared. We want to increase the use of our studio space as a hub of skills building, action, changemaking and connection amongst young people, educators, city-builders and organizations. We want to more fully use our skills, experience, and space to encourage network building, experimentation, and deliver real-world projects that matter. Organisational Learning. We need a stronger organisational structure to be resilient and grow our impact. This project is key to us establishing charitable non-profit status, a Board, and good governance and management practices. Ongoing evaluation needs to become more meaningfully integrated into our work in order to more deeply understand the effectiveness and impacts of our social innovations in the communities and systems that we work.
$100,000.00
2016

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation

From the Ground up: Empowering BC communities to protect coastal temperate rainforest

Forested watersheds on Vancouver Island and BC’s South Coast are being heavily logged with negative impacts to water quality and availability, wildlife habitat, carbon stores, local economies, and our collective resilience against climate change. Only approx. 8% of the forested area of Vancouver Island and 6% of the forested area of the South Coast are protected and most of the productive old-growth has been logged. Regulations requiring the forest industry to self-monitor are ineffective at maintaining ecosystem health. Community members have become increasingly disconnected from the state of the forests in their region due to a lack of information and options for meaningful input. One of the ways to convince provincial decision-makers to implement conservation policy solutions is when they are pressured to do so by a diverse network of citizens; and the public will only get involved when they understand the impacts of forest practices in their backyard. To this end, the social innovation we are testing is to empower communities with localized information on forest health, to motivate people to monitor logging impacts in their watersheds and build support for improved forest practices. Through localized maps, public events, strategic communications, and a ‘gumboots on the ground' strategy to get people out monitoring watersheds, we will raise public awareness of the importance of forest conservation for wildlife habitat, a diverse economy, carbon values, and clean water.
$100,000.00
2015

Tides Canada Initiatives

Water Trust BC

Clean, abundant freshwater is the backbone of British Columbia. It sustains us, our families, our food, our wildlife, and our economy. It keeps us secure. But over-extraction and pollution are growing threats amplified by worsening droughts, forest fires and impacts from climate disruption. Communities and First Nations are being shut out of important decisions affecting their home waters. This project advances solutions for: strengthening our collective resilience to drought and overuse; establishing an independent Water Trust; and advancing co-governed watershed groups that understand, establish priorities and advance action to ensure BCs waters are thriving and secure.
$100,000.00
2019

re-VALUE (Validating All Livelihoods in Urban Environments)

With the shared goal of bringing together binners to help them achieve their aims, the re-VALUE project will collaborate with several partners including the UBC Learning Exchange, City of Vancouver and SFU Woodward’s Cultural Unit – Vancity Office of Community Engagement to reach out to broad community stakeholders and test informal employment opportunity pilots that were identified by binners over the past year. To support successful implementation of the pilots, the Binners' Project (BP) will simultaneously carry out complementary initiatives to raise public awareness and build binner community and capacity. In this way the re-VALUE (Validating All Livelihoods in Urban Environments) project will increase binner involvement and credibility in civic governance and planning for policies on waste, recycling and the container refund. The BP has been successful in bringing together a robust binner community, thus far engaging over 300 binners. Through regular meetings, workshops and activities, we have built a sense of trust and belonging as well as a safe place for individuals to voice their opinions and concerns. This project will meaningfully engage binners in conversations with community stakeholders and positively influence and build individual and binner group capacities.
$100,000.00
2015

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