Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Art Starts in Schools Society

Art is essential - not extra

There is tremendous opportunity for artists and teachers to collaborate as partners in education and explore arts integration in classrooms. Our project seeks to increase the employability of artists in schools. Infusion offers training for artists to develop a complementary teaching practice, woven into their robust artistry. Teaching artists have greater opportunities to work in schools as they can speak the language of education. Infusion provides educators with professional development to expand their understanding of art in education. Our project seeks to change: - Basic routines: Artists interested in working in schools need support as navigating school culture can be intimidating and even prohibitive. Teachers teach the way they teach and need a compelling reason to explore new approaches like arts integration. - Resources: The role of artists in schools needs to be expanded in order to re-establish the flow of resources. - Beliefs: Young people are taught that art is separate from the rigor of ‘academic’ subjects. Since 2012, we have supported 97 artists to become teaching artists. This grant will help us launch the next phase, which is to deploy resources to the following: mentorship, marketing systems, advocacy and evaluation. This next phase will help us examine whether the role of art is actually expanding in the education system, and inevitably our community, and if the perception of how young people are taught to perceive art is actually changing.
$225,000.00
2017

Emily Carr University of Art and Design Foundation

The Shumka Centre for Creative Entrepreneurship

Artists and designers face challenges including economic marginalization, disconnection from established spheres of entrepreneurial teaching, and widespread misunderstanding of their role in creating new ideas that have practical application in the world. But the impact that artists and designers could have on innovation in society is huge. Efforts to support professional development for artists and designers are often ill-suited to their specific needs. By identifying the barriers that they face in a changing social and technological environment; supporting great ideas; and applying business model development methods, a socially inclusive and economically impactful future is within reach.
$225,000.00
2018

Heiltsuk Tribal Council

Sacred Journeys -The resurgence of Indigenous Canoes -Travelling Exhibit

Social innovation and change intertwine in the main goals of Sacred Journeys. Sacred Journeys an engaging travelling exhibit about Indigenous canoe culture. At a fundamental level, it is about cultural revival,cultural health and cross cultural understanding. By touring15-20 major BC museums and Indigenous cultural centres over 4-5 years, it will engage and educate 10,000s of visitors from children to leaders. Appropriately, the exhibit will become a permanent display in Bella Bella, where it will continue to inspire both visitors and community members alike. Through its many teachings, metaphors, and values, the ocean going canoe was and is central to the daily life, culture, and spirituality of First Peoples of the Pacific Coast. Almost lost through the effects of colonization and technology, the Heiltsuk were instrumental in reviving this canoe culture and for the first time will share their story. Against the norm of museums, this story will be produced an told from Indigenous peoples prospective. By walking through a stylized ocean going canoe one will be able to touch a screen embedded in the symbolic supernatural paddles ; each screen will share the Indigenous people’s history, culture and stories, leading to the present, with an option to comment and ask questions. It will inspire visitors to engage in the revival of the Indigenous culture, thus leading to better health and wellness in our local communities and educating the general public.
$223,000.00
2017

Kokoro Dance Theatre Society

KW Studios Accessibility Project

The Downtown Eastside of Vancouver is challenged by issues of homelessness and housing, addiction and mental illness, the health crisis, and crime. Arts by themselves cannot address these issues directly, but they can have a beneficial effect by developing a sense of community, of improving the quality of life, and contributing to positive change in local economies, social environments, neighbourhood character, and demographics. Through providing subsidized access to Kokoro Dance's new state of the art KW Studios, this project will influence system change by building a stronger sense of a creative DTES community of engaged and productive performing artists.
$225,000.00
2018

Lookout Society

Tide Pools: Art Thrives

The Lookout Society has worked with people with low or no income who have few, if any, housing or support options for over 40 years in the DTES area. Regaining and maintaining stability requires access to healthy choices and livelihoods. For many here this includes creative practices and social programs. Through our partnership with Gallery Gachet this project will strengthen outreach to community art programs. We will grow external relations to enhance training and mentorship. We can advance our community artists’ livelihoods. The Canada Council recognizes arts training beyond college and university education and includes mentorship, a history of exhibition, peer recognition and civic arts involvement as contributing to an artist’s profile. We can increase artist’s access to artist fees and recognize the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2014 decision to protect the minimal rights of artists to be paid. We will find new and alternative venues for exhibition, performance, sales and social engagement and we will broaden our participation in realms of cultural production beyond our neighbourhood. This project will advance both outreach and 'inreach'. With the support of staff and volunteers we will improve points of contact with culture-producing venues to gain and share a clear picture of arts programming. Identifying gaps, Gallery Gachet will create new educational opportunities and form a community alliance for the arts.
$225,000.00
2016

Massey Theatre Society

Indigenous Arts Series (Skookum Arts Series)

The Skookum Indigenous Arts Series will celebrate some of the most dynamic Aboriginal Theatre artists, musicians, dance artists, visual and media artists from across the country. This arts celebration will help to raise awareness of First Nations talent, artistic practices, and foster cultural exchange and dialogue. With this, Massey Theatre Society is creating a new program to create a focus in its physical and cultural renewal. This celebration project will priorities inclusion of indigenous artists at the forefront as the theatre enters its 70th anniversary year and beyond. Innovation is furthered by the accompanying goals of identifying a presenting network for the series moving it beyond its host community and developing Savage Society's capacity to promote the program on an ever widening network creating opportunities to showcase Savage Society's productions along with other Aboriginal Performance works. Savage Society, an aboriginal theatre company and partner in this project has a curatorial goal is to create an arts series that brings participants into a shared experience of indigenous arts and culture in a way that is inviting, inspiring and illuminating. Performances will include dance, theatre, and music. We will also showcase Indigenous films, animation, literary and media artists and visual artists. We intend to promote socio-political dialogue as well in partnership with community organizers and institutions.
$225,000.00
2017

Queer Arts Festival

UnSettling: A Vision from the Margins

This 3­-year commitment redirects established flows of money & power with strategic hires at key levels—intentional & visible placements of Queer People Of Colour (QPOC) in positions of cultural authority & focused initiatives to nurture promising emerging QPOC cultural workers into future arts leaders. QAF engages Adrian Stimson (Siksika), T’uy’tanat-­Cease Wyss (Skwxwu7mesh/Sto:Lo) & Valérie d. Walker to curate our 2017­-19 visual art exhibitions respectively, with engagements in public discourse, outreach & collaborations with diverse partners. Guest lectures at grunt, ECUAD, UBC, & SFU increase QPOC visibility in public & academic contemporary visual art discourse. Exhibition tours for queer, Indigenous & street-­involved youth, artist panels & public fora provide entry points to the often exclusive visual art milieu through direct contact with QPOC role models. The project also engages emerging QPOC arts administrator Kimberly Sayson in full­-time, multi­-year paid mentorship & an emerging exhibition preparator, cultivating well-­rounded competencies & leadership skills. By interrupting the cyclical narrative of exclusion, we increase individual experience, income & influence for QPOC curators, artists & administrators that they can leverage toward future opportunities; improve organizational resilience by expanding perspectives & networks; & shift cultural beliefs to re­vision QPOC identity as a site for expertise & creative self­-authorship rather than a mark of disenfranchisement.
$225,000.00
2017

Surrey Art Gallery Association

Youth Engagement Strategy (YES) Program

SOCIAL INNOVATION: SAGA’s Partnering to Advance Social Capital through Strengthening Youth and Community Art Surrey is an increasingly important urban centre with a diverse, multi-ethnic population of over 500,000, with 40% under the age of 30 (30% of population is under 19, and a further 10% are under 30) and the province’s largest school district. 1,000 new residents arrive each month, not including children born here. Since 1984, SAGA has partnered with the Surrey Art Gallery (audience 50,000 annually), and other cultural and community organizations, to further its mission to advance community engagement with the contemporary arts and to support artists. Youth Engagement Strategy (YES) Program will enhance connection with and develop programming for youth and young adults. This initiative will implement and evaluate best practices for engaging young people between the ages of 15-30 in Surrey. Social Innovations include: partnering to advance social capital; shifting power dynamics; enabling young people to learn from and with artists and their community to build their skills; providing programs driven by youth for youth; and demonstrating potential of sustainable growth for participants, partners, and community.
$225,000.00
2016

UBC - Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery

Beginning with the Seventies: Activism, Art & Archives

Our project will consist of three consecutive exhibitions, public programs and events, an online resource and book publication. Recognizing the resurgence of interest in social movements of the 70s: we will present Alexandra Bischoff’s reconstruction of the Vancouver Women’s Bookstore (1973-1996), including its inaugural inventory. Connecting with activist organizations and their archives as a resource: we will present a new collaboration by Marianne Nicolson and Althea Thauberger, supported by Union of BC Indian Chiefs researcher Robyn Laba. Recognizing that our collections do not reflect the diversity of art practices in the region: we will work with other institutions to explore our collections as a porous public resource in order to develop alternative narratives. Generating study and exchange between and among multiple generations of artists and activists: we will present new work by Dana Claxton, Ethel Gardner, Jeneen Frei Njootli and the ReMatriate Collective based on research into the Service, Office and Retail Workers’ Union of Canada (SORWUC). Embracing the idea of intergenerational citation in feminist, Indigenous and other cultural traditions: we will hire emerging artists and archivists and create opportunities to bring diverse communities together in dialogue. Together, the project destabilizes established narratives of contemporary art; opens up conversations about collections, and creates new research to leave as a legacy in the public record.
$225,000.00
2017

Urban Ink Production Society

Reclaiming Space for Indigenous Arts

The social innovation of this project is to produce large-scale, mainstream, socially conscious and community engaged productions for 3 test years. During these seasons, there will be large scale work, led by Indigenous artists. This is an essential part of the social innovation of this project, as not only will Indigenous artists be being given ongoing work but also our community and audience will broaden through a more ongoing programming. The projects over the three years will focus a spotlight on the voices of Indigenous women through the following works: "Moonlodge" by Margo Kane - Agnes(Cree) has somehow finished high school, and now she’s hitch-hiking to California – or maybe New Mexico. Wherever the music is. Wherever the Powwow is. Wherever her family is. Only the venerable Margo Kane has ever performed this seminal solo work, full of life and wit, a classic of Indigenous Canadian theatre. "Unnatural and Accidental Women" by Marie Clements - The Unnatural and Accidental Women is a surrealist dramatization of a thirty-year murder case involving many mysterious deaths in the “Skid Row” area of Vancouver. "Sedna" by Reneltta Arluk & Corey Payette -Sedna is the Inuit goddess and a powerful force in Nunavut and around the Arctic circle. In tracing her story through Nunavut, Greenland, Norway, and Russia we awaken audiences outside of the North to be respectful of our oceans. It is an empowering Indigenous story about our women and their strength in our society.
$225,000.00
2016

Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

VSO's New Chapter: Connecting People, Connecting Cultures

The VSO will create, experiment, produce, and disseminate 10 high-profile cultural events over the next three years chosen for topical and cultural relevancy that challenge the assumption that cultural institutions are discretionary resources for selected members of society. The adaptive power inherent in cultural institutions when they envision themselves as a civic asset will be tested via projects that focus on a broad spectrum of ages, ethnicities, socio-economic backgrounds, employing exceptional artistic talents to demonstrate the potential of social inclusion. We believe this deep and broad initiative to connect people and cultures will transform not only VSO’s current and future practice, but by sharing our findings, will transform the practice of similarly motivated institutions. VSO’s New Chapter focuses on three areas for their collective ability to foster change: 1. First Nations: Creation of a 3-year partnership of reconciliation beginning with First Nations Artist-in-Residence: Marion Newman, and ending with a multi-faceted First Nations-sourced commission to be performed in Vancouver, B.C. and Victoria, B.C. 2. Community Engagement: The “Beat of the Drum” commission will create music for all abilities; integrating deaf and disabled communities with all music lovers and genres collaborating with world-renown deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie. 3. Gender Balance and Equality: Virtuosic female talent give voice to stories of our past, present, and future.
$225,000.00
2017