Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

BC SPCA Strategic Plan 2014-2018

In 2013, the BC SPCA will undertake a comprehensive province-wide stakeholder and public consultation process to assist in the development and approval of a strategic plan for 2014 through 2018. Once approved, the new strategic plan will define the organization’s direction and prioritize programming and the allocation of resources for that five year period. The process will also include an evaluation of the BC SPCA’s current Mission, Vision and Charter, as well as the Guiding Principles and strategic objectives.
$10,000.00
2012

Improving the Welfare of Cats in BC SPCA Shelters

The BC SPCA operates on evidence-based programs that apply the outcomes of scientific research to improving the welfare of animals throughout BC. In our continued effort to maintain the highest levels of welfare possible, we will be converting ouo current cat cages into larger enclosures at 33 of our shelters. The latest animal welfare research by Dr. Kate Hurley, Director of Shelter Medicine at University of California Davis (UC Davis) and the North America leader in cat research, states that cats must have a minimum of 11 square feet per cage for optimum welfare. Current BC SPCA cages average only 5.5 feet. To improve this situation, we will be combining our current cages using cost effective method development by UC Davis. By installing a circular polyvinyl chloride (PVC) portal, two cages can be joined, transforming a single stainless steel cage into double compartment cage units that a cat can easily travel between.
$12,000.00
2011

Canadian Animal Assistance Team

Strategic Communications & Marketing for the Canadian Animal Assistance Team

The expansion of our marketing strategy would include: - Improvements to the current web site content and functionality to ensure a current and compelling experience for members and those being introduced to the organization for the first time. The website serves as CAAT's online hub, for education, information sharing and fundraising during periods inbetween signature events. - Expansion of our social media presence to more effectively share what our organization is doing and to support and create opportunities for dirent connections with our followers, with clear, simple calls to action to get involved in the work of CAAT by joining missions or through financial or in-kind donations. - Expansion of our education and awareness materials (pamphlets, posters, and wallet cards) and increase distribution of that material.
$10,000.00
2014

Cetus Research & Conservation Society

Towards the development of a marine mammal conservation and education program

Our mission is to protect the lives of whales living in or transiting through Johnstone & Georgia Straits while at the same time educating the public about their responsibilities while on the water. Through our programs Straitwatch and Robson Bight Wardens, we engage directly with the public, alerting them to their impact on whales and other marine mammals. We also intervene directly, diverting pleasure and fishing boats from, intentionally or not, harassing or endangering whales. Recreational boating along the BC coast is steadily increasing. This has created an almost untenable situation for the region's orcas and other cetaceans. Death and injury by propellers and abandoned fishing gear, endless noise, disruption of travelling pods and sleep lines, and the relentless invasion of their space has created an ever-more precarious existence for these animals, whose abilities to thrive or even exist are already under threat from over-fishing and climate change. In order to ensure these animals' ability to survive and prosper, it is crucial not only to continue our efforts to inform the public and protect the whales directly; we must also shift the paradigm through which we perceive our relationship with and responsibility to wildlife. Our intention is to broaden the spectrum of those responsible for the welfare and protection of whales from a small coterie of "experts" to the broader public as a whole.
$10,000.00
2015

Critter Care Wildlife Society

Building Enclosures for the Smaller Animals

Critter Care Wildlife Society rehabilitates all our native mammals from squirrels to black bear cubs our focus over the last five years was to get enclosures in tip top shape for the bigger animals. Our squirrel cages are badly in need of being rebuilt. They are very old and each year we are continually having to repair them. The enclosures for the squirrels need to be built on a much larger scale as it is hard for the flying squirrels to get proper exercise before being released. We need to be able to add natural foliage like branches, stumps etc. so they are prepared when released. For the other small animals we need to just rebuild new ones as the old are rotten. We would like to build 4 - 8ft' long (hutch type enclosures for some of the small animals) 3 - 8'X12' squirell enclosures. They would be erected on cement slabs.
$10,760.00
2011

Get Bear Smart Society

Fundraising Collateral Creation - Book: Joy of Bears

To create a small hardcover photo book 5"x7", 96 pages as fundraising collateral that is also educational. Projected return on investment is 68%. The images of bears in the book will be chosen for their impact on people's emotions; how effectively they reduce fearful attitudes and instill a healthy respect. E.g. a photo of a bear standing on its hind legs reveals their phylogenetic similarity to people, helping people to understand that bears are not that unlike us, and moving them toward a more compassionate feeling and enlightened attitude without going to the other extreme: making bears seem like "pets". Other photos will inspire joyful reactions; perhaps depicting moms interacting with their cubs; or smiling bears. Accompanying text will be geared to accomplish the same. The size of the book was purposely chosen to be small to keep costs down; be easy for stores to display as well as easy for people to pick up and pack along. Suggested retail will be $9.95 - a price point that will produce maximum sales. Books to be sold within 3 years. See section 16 re: profitability.
$10,000.00
2012

Greyhaven Exotic Bird Sanctuary

Sanctuary Improvements

A project to improve the sanctuary environment to maintain and improve the health and welfare of rescued birds awaiting adoption.
$10,757.01
2011

Ksan House Society

Ksan Pets Program

In November 2009, Ksan House Society convened a planning group with the short term goal of developing a program that will assist pets of any victims of domestic violence in difficult times, including when staying at the shelter. Ksan House Society identified and invited some valued community members including animal rescue groups who are bringing expertise, compassion and energy to the initial planning process. This group, Ksan Pets Program, has determined there is a need for an onsite dog and cat kennel. We have worked out agreements with local organizations to provide pets with shelter as a short term solution, and are currently raising funds for the onsite kennel.
$15,000.00
2011

Northern Lights Wildlife Society

Ungulate Facility Expansion Project

NLWS has been rehabilitating ungulates since 1990 and has successfully rehabilitated over 50 moose calves and 75 deer fawns. As knowledge of the shelter grown, yearly admittance numbers are rising steadily and the existing facility is no longer able to house the number of animals admitted. As a result, an expansion of the current facility is of great importance to ensure that we can accept all of the animals in need. We are proposing to fence an 8500 square foot area which would double out enrollment possibilities for the ungulates into our program.
$12,457.80
2011

Ocean Wise Conservation Association

The Marine Mammal Rescue Pool Platform & Stairs Project (MMR Pool Platform & Stairs Project)

The Vancouver Awaurium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre consists of indoor and outdoor spaces, all designed for efficient and effective marine mammal care. Staffed with medical and well trained animal care experts the MMR utilizes the full potential of its current location on the Port Metro Vancouver lands. The indoor space includes food preparation areas, a laboratory and pharmacy, an examination room, anesthetic machine and recovery areas for debilitated animals. The outdoor facilities consist of a variety of holding pools and tubs. These are of varying sizes and designs, to suit different sizes and kinds of marine mammals. The site is organized so that new arrivals, and/or sick animals are separated from any healthy marine mammals. This reinforces the principles of quarantine that are so important in wildlife rehabilitation. About 100 marine animals are admitted to the MMR Centre every year. Some may be in peril due to habitat destruction and environmental damage, others are suffering from injury due to boat strikes or entanglement in marine debris and many of the young ones have been separated from their mothers (eg by the presence of people on the beach). Threatened and at-risk species are among those animals that have been rescued and rehabilitated at the Centre. When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground in 1989, spilling crude oil into the waters of Prince WIlliam Sound and threatening a huge number of animals, the Vancouver Aquarium immediately sent representatives from its Marine Mammal Rescue team to help. A few of the rescued animals deemed unreleasable into the wild and in need of long-term care were fortunate to find homes in aquariums. That is how Nyac, then just a small sea otter pup, came to the Vancouver Aquarium. This much loved animal served as an ambassador for her species for nearly 20 years, helping to teach children and their families about the importance of preserving aquatic life. More recently, a two-month old harbour porpoise, named Jack, that was stranded in Horseshoe Bay, BC, was rescued and brought to the MMR Centre on September 16, 2011. He is one of a species considered of "special concern" and is being monitored 24 hours a day. When the MMR Centre team arrived in Horseshoe Bay, the 12-kilogram stranded harbour porpoise had difficulty breathing and could no longer swim. His muscles and skin were severely damaged by the pressure of being stranded on the beach. He was immediately transferred to the Vancouver Aquarium's Marine Mammal Rescue Centre for treatment. It is stories like Nyac, Jack and the recently released and rehabilitated California sea lion, Flash, that provide valuable lessons learned from having a larger animal in care at MMR and that are influencing our plans for 2011 and beyond. (Click on the link to view a summary of the rescue, rehabilitation and subsequent release of Flash) http://www.globaltvbc.com/video/fishhook+sea+lion+released/video.html?v=21487672078#stories/video The MMR Pool Platform & Stairs Project is a priority for the Vancouver Aquarium and the MMR, not only for the comfort and safety of the marine mammals but also for the comfort and safety of our staff and volunteers who are currently using the burdensome manner of climbing a step ladder to care for and feed the marine mammal in the larger Saltwater Rehabilitation Tank. The MMR Pool Platform and Stairs Project are the construction of a stable platform and set of stairs around our largest Saltwater Rehabilitation Tank which was paid for through donations by our Board of Directors. At 30 ft in diameter and 10 ft in depth this tank is a critical component of the MMR as it allows larger marine mammals to have enough space to move and swim more freely, giving the injured wild marine mammal time to rehabilitate, heal and reduce the amount stress while being cared for. Currently MMR staff and volunteers have difficulty attending to the marine mammals because of limited access to the tank other than through the use of step ladders.
$13,721.00
2011

Pacific Assistance Dogs Society

Advanced Kennel Rehabilitation

PADS Dogs from the ages of approximately 14 months to 24 months live at our facility where they are trained by our professional staff for specialized tasks related to their ultimate placement with clients. At this time, the kennels and training area are in serious need of repair and restoration. Mould has been discovered and all of the drywall will have to be removed and replaced. In addition the dogs have chewed areas of the kennels and our veterinarian has indicated that the deterioration may pose a significant health concern to the dogs. We need to undertake this project immediately and have asked for quotes from 3 contractors whose estimates off the top of their heads was $20,000 - $30,000. We are awaiting their written estimates and can provide them shortly for more specific details. (for the purpose of this application we have used a median $25,000 as total estimated costs but will send the actual estimate as quickly as it is made available to us.)
$15,000.00
2011

Paws for Hope Animal Foundation

Creating a strategic response to animal welfare issues in British Columbia

This project intends to identify the appropriate role for Paws for Hope Animal Foundation in addressing animal welfare issues in the province to ensure we are providing meaningful engagement and outcomes in the work that we do. Paws for Hope was founded in 2011, and over the past four years we have successfully developed partnerships across the province that have helped us to implement successful programs to support and enhance the lives of companion animals. The animal welfare/rescue system in BC is very fractured, however, and as a result does not necessarily provide an environment to support sustainable solutions to protect and enhance the lives of animals, despite the fact that there are many organizations doing critical life saving work. We would like to situate ourselves to be of the most benefit to ensure a responsive animal welfare system that supports the community as whole, the animal rescue community, and companion animals across the province. We would like to build upon our existing partnerships to ensure we all have a meaningful voice and constructive role in responding to current issues and needs in a fiscally conservative environment. To do this we would undertake a three year process that will identify what is being done throughout the province; what are the gaps; what we are doing well, what we should continue doing and enhance; what we should stop doing, and what new programs we should start.
$10,000.00
2015

Rest.Q Animal Sanctuary Society

Rest.Q Safe House - Galiano Island, B.C.

Rest.q would like to construct 2 small buildings (10'X10' each) totally dedicated to caring for unique animal situations. Animals who are awaiting transport to the vet, animals at the end of life needing peace and quiet, animals needing medical attention or any other special needs situation that would find comfort and quiet in the Safe House. The houses would contain kennels, sleeping cots, running water, heat, light, and whatever is needed to provide a clean, safe environment.
$10,000.00
2011

35 x 45 sq ft Fenced Enclosure for Rest.Q Safe House on Galiano Island

Phase 1 of our infrastructure development plan is currently underway as we begin to construct 2 small buildings called Safe Houses for the animals in need on Galiano Island. To adequately meet the holistic needs of animals to be housed in the Safe Houses, Phase 2 of the development plan involves creating an enclosed outdoor area attached to each Safe House (total 35x45sq ft). This enclosure will offer animals the opportunity to exercise and explore nature while they are with us at the sanctuary. Some will be unable to go outside due to their medical needs. However there will be others who are in transition and would benefit from freedom to be indoors and/or outdoors. The additional space with an outdoor enclosure will provide animals with an opportunity to retreat and relax while maintaining their safety. The completely enclosed outdoor area AND the Safe Houses will enable us to more adequately meet animal needs. We hope that you can help us to help those who cannot speak and have such great needs.
$13,300.00
2011

Senior Animals in Need Today Society

Chicken/Duck/Turkey Enclosure

SAINTS is a unique environment. Rather than the traditional stainless steel kennels and cement floors of a shelter, the sanctuary is based out of the founder’s home. SAINTS is located on a three acre property on the outskirts of Mission, surrounded by agricultural land. Over the years, its rooms have been renovated to meet the needs of the animals, as have the outlying buildings and barn. Being a charity, however, SAINTS is typically able to take on only one project at a time. Since it was started in 2004, a good deal of progress has been made. Enclosures have been built to allow the cats protected outdoor access; an isolation room and an office have been added; and a room with a large outdoor run has been created to separate the cats with feline leukemia. More recently, the outdoor shelters near the barn have been modified to provide refuge for several farm animals seized in a BC SPCA cruelty investigation. Now, the most pressing need for SAINTS is updated housing for its chickens, ducks, and elderly, blind turkey. The new enclosure will give the birds indoor and outdoor access, while providing protection from the elements and security from predators. The new enclosure will also allow birds with special needs to be separated from the main flock as needed.
$15,000.00
2011

The Responsible Animal Care Society

Rabbit Rescue Sanctuary

In 2008 a shelter to house rescued rabbits was hastily constructed in East Kelowna, on land donated by a wonderful woman who cares deeply about animals. This housed the initial rescue of 45 bunnies. The rescue effort has continued. This shelter has grown and now houses about 380 neutered and spayed rabbits in various pens. The hastily built pens, of an emergency nature, have deteriorated, and now offer only marginal protection to our rescued friends. The flat roof has developed leaks. There can be an accumulation of snow in the winter, due to the Kelowna climate, and it is dangerous for our volunteers to climb onto the roof to clear the snow. The under-wired floor mesh is rusting in places and holes have now been created by the rabbits. We are forever doing patch-work throughout the present building. Completion of the replacement shelters will provide our rescued rabbits with a safe and weatherproof living space.
$11,080.00
2011

The South Okanagan Rehabilitation Centre for Owls

Rehabilitation Clinic

Build a structure that would serve as a medical treatment clinic for birds. This facility would incorporate: -Bird reception area -Examination room -Medical treatment area -Intensive care recovery area -Storage room for food & supplies -Interpretive room for training and engaging interested groups (i.e. schools) -Are for volunteer lockers
$15,000.00
2011

Turtle Valley Donkey Refuge Society

Barn #1 Enhancement Project

To add a covered overhang roof to Barn #1 which will provide a weather protected area for the resident donkeys and enhance their opportunity for increased comfort during inclement weather.
$13,268.00
2011

Vancouver Humane Society

ChickenOUT!

Initiated in 2002, the goal of Chicken OUT! is to improve the quality of life for the millions of egg-laying hens that are raised in small wire (battery) cages in BC and Canada. We produce, gather and share research on the cruelty involved in raising hens in battery cages to educate the public about alternative cage-free production systems that offer higher welfare and thus improved life quality for hens. We believe that if people understand the issues, they will make choices that favour the purchase of more humane cage-free eggs. In addition to encouraging individual consumers, Chicken OUT! works with universities, municipalities and food businesses to adopt cage-free egg purchasing policies for campus and city-run food service facilities, restaurants and grocery stores. This growing public interest in cage-free eggs will in turn encourage more egg producers to transition to cage-free production methods, and thus reduce the suffering of egg-laying hens.
$10,000.00
2011

Wildlife Rescue Association of British Columbia

Developing Financial Sustainability through an Expanded Donor Base

This project will focus on building WRA's development capacity by: - Purchasing a new donor database. Our current database is woefully inadequate for our current and projected needs, especially as we aggressively grow out donor base in the coming years. - Acquiring new donors through direct mail (DM). While DM is not suseful with certain audiences and is expensive, it is effective for acquiring new donors from an older demographic, which our donor base has a significant portion of. We are planning a 5000 piece mail-out to select neighbourhoods in central and north Burnaby and Vancouver. - Hiring a consultant to help build our capacity in undertaking email and website donor prospecting. We have email addresses for most of the people who bring wildlife to the Care Centre. The challenge is how to cost effectively covert these prospects into donors. An email - website prospect campaign is an effective means of acquiring donors, but we require assistance in this relatively new area of fundraising. Developing new publications: planed giving brochure and wildlife 'finders' form.
$10,000.00
2014

Website Development

The WRA is planning a complete redevelopment of its website. This project will provide important new features, services and upgrades that will create a better communications tool to engage, inform and inspire the community about our important work for wildlife.
$10,000.00
2012