Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Miistakis Institute for the Rockies Inc.

Road Watch BC: Involving people in getting animals safely across the road.

Our program will integrate science, technology and innovation to address biodiversity loss associated with roads through the establishment of a citizen science program. Road Watch BC will enable the driving public to generate a large and spatially precise dataset of wildlife observations associated with Highway 3, using a smartphone application that allows passengers to immediately upload wildlife sightings and collisions to our on-line database.This information can then be shared with government agencies, scientists, civil society organizations, communities and local governments and to inform mitigation solutions, promote local awareness of crossing locations and change driving behavior. This program will influence systemic change by altering the flow of resources and how people behave. A citizen science approach improves the fluidity of knowledge and democratizes science by enabling the public to participate in information collection, analysis and sharing. Citizen science programming fosters dialogue within a community and builds engagement around a challenge, ultimately improving the diversity of stakeholders engaged in developing solutions. In addition, we expect to see behavior change whereby participants will know where wildlife are most common along the highway enabling modification of driving behavior. We also expect participants to have a general heightened awareness of the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions, and to adjust their behavior accordingly.
$75,000.00
2016

UBC - Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Development of Humane Wildlife Control Accreditation Program

BC is known internationally for its diverse fauna, flora and landscapes; however, human activity can endanger wild animals and their habitat. Often to resolve human-wildlife conflicts, wildlife control is undertaken. This generally involves considerable animal suffering and can cause harmful environmental and non-target impacts. Although much research on control methods exists, this has yet to be translated into evidence-based codes of practice or standard operating procedures in Canada. As a result, there is no accepted set of methods that are regarded as “humane” for both lethal and non-lethal practices. The need for this type of credible standard has been expressed by the BC SPCA, the pest control industry, property owners and management companies, as well as by other Canadian and international animal welfare organizations. The beneficiaries of this project thus include the public, humane and conservation organizations, and the millions of wild animals subject to control practices every year in Canada. The UBC AWP is a leader in promoting welfare within conservation activities, recently hosting the 2015 Compassionate Conservation conference. In 2015, the UBC AWP also began development of evidence-based standards for humane wildlife control and is now seeking funding to test an innovative social enterprise opportunity. The project will continue a strong partnership with the BC SPCA, translating academic knowledge to operational standards and an accreditation program.
$180,000.00
2016

Victoria Humane Society

First Nations Animal Management Clinic Project

To effectively deal with dog overpopulation, an Animal Management Program must be established and implemented to gain control of the issue as well as educate, empower, and challenge the community to incorporate Bylaws and regulations in pet ownership. The VHS will work with three First Nations to provide the following services over a minimum period of three years to eradicate the issue of dog overpopulation: • Wellness exams that will include basic inoculations and deworming as well as other medical services that may be required • Sterilization and micro chip implants for sterilized animals • Workshops regarding animal welfare including the advantages of spaying and neutering new animals in the future • Round up and removal of unwanted or unowned dogs that will be transported to Victoria where they will be fostered and put up for adoption This socially innovative project will influence systemic change by: 1. Addressing the issue of unwanted companion animals by preventing the birth of unwanted litters. 2. Serving as a model for communities of all sizes and geographic areas. 3. Adopting a community directed approach to the issue rather than a hard policy approach that would likely be ineffective. 4. Using outreach and education components to change ongoing behaviour towards companion animals while addressing systemic issues regarding animal overpopulation. 5. Using a collaborative approach bringing together animal rescue agencies, First Nations and veterinarians.
$140,000.00
2016