Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Alberni Drug and Alcohol Prevention Services Society

The B.R.A.V.E. Project - Boys building Resileincy, Values and Empathy

The BRAVE Project (Build, Resiliency, Values and Empower) is a prevention initiative that builds resiliency and critical thinking skills in youth. The program is a recreation-based, skills development group and weekend prevention outreach for boys aged 12-14. Each series of the BRAVE Project runs six weeks and explores the following topics: Media Messaging and Masculinity, Stress and Coping, Violence, Substance Use, Health Promotion and Personal Challenge/Goal Setting. Each session is two and a half hours and consists of topic discussion and a recreation, skill building or art based activity. By utilizing ADAPS' existing community partnerships, participants experience martial arts, wilderness recreation, bicycle mechanics and community based recreation opportunities through our city parks and recreation. Experiential Learning opportunities such as these are delivered in a way that addresses the four quadrants of resiliency building for youth: Independence, Mastery, Generosity, and Belonging. Strong relationships between youth and a caring adult is key in building resiliency. Outreach services to BRAVE participants and their peers are an important part of this prevention program. The Youth Action Outreach Worker is in the community, building relationships with these youth and supporting prevention initiatives at the Nights Alive Program. The outreach component of BRAVE helps youth to develop relationships to their community supports, and to access healthy activities.
$10,000.00
2015

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Youth Building Community in the Kitchen and Around the Table

Gordon House proposes to Create a weekly community kitchen project, engaging nutritionally vulnerable youth in our community in preparing a meal for each other, under the guidance of a culinary professional. We propose to use this space to animate a discussion, grounded in the Listening Circle model of social engagement taught to us by the Metro Vancouver Alliance, around the root causes of food insecurity, to generate new models of addressing this issue, and to lead the participants into engaging in action which will have a broader impact on the systems they, and others in similar situations, use to access food
$10,000.00
2013

Atira Women's Resource Society

Maxxine Wright Early Care and Learning Centre

The Maxxine Wright Early Care and Learning Centre is a 59 - space daycare associated with Maxxine Wright Place, a comprehensive residential and health/emotional support program for women who are pregnant and/or early parenting and at risk. The daycare has been open since early 2010 and has struggled to achieve full enrollment/break even, for a variety of reasons including: -Atira's inexperience in operating daycares; -The number of infant toddler spaces, which is higher than usual because of the residential program mandate; - Stigma attached to the daycare due to the residential program. We are requesting financial support to stave off closure of the daycare while we reinvigorate our efforts to achieve full enrollment, which includes increased advertising and a comprehensive communications strategy, better utilization of our networks, a mentoring /spportive partnership with the YMCA daycare programs, revisiting our licensing/considering reconfiguration of the types of spaces and training/support of our staff to be more involved in helping us solve the problems.
$10,000.00
2011

Blind Beginnings Society

New Parent Workshop Series

The ‘New Parent’ Workshop Series will provide information and access to peer support for parents who are new to raising a blind child. Parents with blind or visually impaired children of any age can attend monthly workshops on a variety of topics such as: orientation & mobility, self-directed discovery, importance of braille literacy, how to optimize the vision a child has, social skill development, funding sources available to blind children, assistive technology options, sports and recreation opportunities, daily living skills, organizational techniques, parenting skills, and looking ahead to the future. Following each workshop, parents can participate in a Support Group meeting facilitated by a registered clinical counsellor. As a drop-in program, parents can attend the topics that are of relevance and interest to them. Child-care allowance will be offered to help reduce barriers to participation. New parents can also be matched with Support Parents who have experience raising a blind child and can provide ongoing peer support and guidance.
$6,000.00
2012

Canucks Autism Network Society

CLICK (a social photography program)

CLICK is a social photography program for teens aged 13-17 living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). While working with their peers, groups of ten teens with ADS will learn basic camera use, take pictures and explore social skills and friendship through their own photography. Each session, participants will have the opportunity to share their photos and discuss the subject matter of their work. The participants will also be expected to take photos with the group during each lesson as well as take photos during the week while they are not at CLICK. The program will end with a gallery show of everyone's work presented to a group of staff, family and friends. The program will be led by a fully qualified photography instructor and supported by Canucks Autism Network program staff.
$6,175.00
2012

Children's Family House Society of BC

Ronald McDonald House BC Lego Lounge

The Lego Lounge: A new RMH BC, a room full of Lego for sick children and their families: this innovative program at the new Ronald McDonald House will go a long way to easing the burdens of the life-threatening illnesses these families face. It will be the first Lego program at any Ronald McDonald House in the world. All children need a safe place to play in good weather and bad, and our Lego Lounge will provide that space. Your help today will ensure that children who are in the various stages of critical care, together with their siblings and parents, will have a unique place to safely play inside, have fun and let go of their cares for a while. But the Lego Lounge is much more than a playroom. Lego is a toy that is familiar to so many children. It helps break down barriers and allows kids to meet and play with other kids. Our bi-weekly programs with a Lego Certified Professional and members of the Vancouver Lego Club will be an opportunity for kids to explore new ways to build with Lego, and take them away from the hospital environment and into a world of imagination
$10,000.00
2014

Clayoquot Biosphere Trust Society

Generation Y-Not?: Growing Local Leaders

Our goal is to create an action plan for sustained engagement of youth in leadership initiatives and civic engagement. We will seek direction from youth. How do they want to be involved in their communities? What is meaningful to them? The project begins in June 2013 with a relationship-building activity sponsored by the CBT and partners. This will give youth and youth leaders from throughout the region a chance to connect and hear about successful youth leadership activities. They will share the programs they've enjoyed, develop strategies to further these projects and envision the leadership programs and youth-led projects that are most meaningful and relevant. Following the forum, we will facilitate up to five regional youth gatherings based on objectives identified by the youth. The gatherings will be diverse and varied, hosted in communities throughout the region. This takes youth from across the region out of 'their boxes' to participate in activities that foster cultural learning, develop leadership skills and build capacity in our communities.
$9,750.00
2013

Community Connections

Girls Move Mountains

Girls Move Mountains is a collaborative project with community partners in Revelstoke. The goal is to engage girls who are entering the critical transition period into adolescence which is a significant time of change physiologically, psychologically, and socially. While many girls are able to make the transition successfully there are also many who struggle with the transition and frequently find themselves in conflict with authorities, missing school, engaging in high risk behaviors, and in general disconnected from the community. Grounded in research on girls development, the Project will support girls capacity for self-confidence, physical and emotional resilience, healthy relationships, positive body image, and regular physical activity. Informed by ideas from adventure-based and experiential learning the girls will meet weekly throughout the school. The weekly activities will facilitated by professionally trained staff and trained Youth Mentors.
$8,000.00
2012

Community Connections Society of Southeast B.C.

Healthy Moms/ Healthy Babes

“Healthy Moms, Healthy Babes” perinatal program reaches women who face challenges to having a healthy pregnancy & families transitioning to parenting a new baby. A group drop-in format provides education, information, nutrition supplements, lay counseling, social connections, support services & links to other community resources through several core components: •social time for participants to share information with each other & build relationships that will support them • healthy lunch prepared by nutrition worker who engages families to assist with lunch, learn food budgeting & cooking skills •parent education/discussion/activity sessions on variety of perinatal topics provided by program facilitator or community service providers •support services such as transportation to & from group; child care during parent education sessions •one to one support for discussion of individual concerns, distribution of food and nutrition supplements, weighing of infants/women, referrals to other agencies, etc. Individual support is also offered through limited home visits.
$4,900.00
2010

CUMBERLAND COMMUNITY SCHOOLS SOCIETY

Cumberland Skatepark

The CCSS Skatepark Committee's goal is to work with the Village of Cumberland Council and Staff, as well as the citizens of Cumberland, to construct a 6000-7000 ft2 concrete skatepark by the end of the summer of 2015. The park will be designed for skateboarders, bmx-ers and scooters, and will be built by a professional skatepark company to ensure its long lasting value to the community. The park will consist of both street and transition elements and will be focused towards beginner to intermediate users who represent the majority of the population. The skatepark will be located in Village Park, a municipal park that serves as the recreational hub of our village. The skatepark will be adjacent to a children's playground and water park, tennis courts, a basketball court and a horseshoe pitch, providing opportunities for all ages in our community to interact. The funds requested in this grant will cover the majority of professional fees for the first design phase of the project. This includes design through community engagement and results in conceptual drawings.
$10,000.00
2014

District of Wells

Starting Well in Wells

The idea for the Wells Community Day Care arose out of conversations among parents at the pre-school play group. The lack of child care was identified as a major hindrance to families with young children in our community. Reliable child care would allow the possibility for both parents and single parents to be part of the work force, especially in a seasonal, tourism-based economy; this is virtually impossible now as there are no options for certified child care. Meanwhile, there is a growing population of families with pre-school aged children. Our intention is to start a licensed, multi-aged (newborn to 12 years) day care facility in Wells providing safe and reliable child care. For many Wells pre-schoolers, such a centre would also provide their first regular, structured learning environment with other children and with an Early Childhood Education practitioner.
$9,250.00
2014

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House

Family Drop-in: Families, Farming and Food

A safe drop-in space for families in the Downtown Eastside (M-F and Sunday from 4-7pm) This program has been developed to improve the determinants of health for families and children in our community through a program emphasis on food literacy, healthy meal preparation, culinary exploration and urban farming practices. A major component to the program is that it will be based on a peer led model. Families will be recruited as both participants, but also as volunteers who will lead the program with the support of a paid coordinator to help actualize their vision within the scope of the project.
$10,000.00
2012

Ehattesaht Tribe

Ehattesaht Children's Playground

Ehattesaht would like to build a culturally appropriate playground as a safe place for their children to play. This project is being undertaken with the full support of the Ehattesaht Chief and Council and through an an Aboriginal Leadership Initiative called Ahp-cii-uk. The main Ehattesaht reserve is small, with barely enough land for the 15 buildings on the reserve. The community is on Zeballos Inlet but cut off from access to the water by a busy logging road. Children not only cross the road to get to the water but they also play on it because they have no safe alternative. The Chief and Council have approved a site for the playground in the main part of the village, adjacent to the Youth Centre that will also eventually house a Headstart program to increase children’s success in, and attachment to, school. One of the requirements of Headstart is a fenced playground. Chief and Council have also purchased some playground equipmentwhich can be used. The project will result in a safe place for Ehattesaht children to play and contribute to social development activities.
$10,000.00
2011

Equitas - International Centre

Speaking Rights - a participatory human rights education toolkit for BC Youth

Speaking Rights is a human rights education project that engages 13-17 year olds in exploring issues that are important to them as they work together to identify strategies to address discrimination, bullying and exclusion. Through Speaking Rights youth workers and youth are trained on the Speaking Rights Toolkit which is an innovative tool which supports and develops the leadership skills of youth by strengthening their knowledge, skills, values, behavior and attitudes. Youth participate in activities and community projects from the Toolkit which open up a space for dialogue and action on issues such as participation, leadership, active citizenship; self-esteem and relationships; violence and intimidation; rights and responsibilities; gender roles; and exclusion, discrimination and racism. The current toolkit is based on a needs assessment conducted with youth and youth workers in Montreal. With the recent success of this project in Montreal, Equitas partners in BC have asked Equitas to adapt the toolkit to meet the Vancouver context and the needs of youth workers and youth in BC.
$10,000.00
2011

Family Services of Greater Vancouver

The Living Wage Investor Project

In Britain, the United States and now in Canada there is increasing support for a ‘living wage’ as a way to ensure that families have enough income to support themselves to develop in a healthy and socially inclusive way. The living wage is about what a family with children would need to earn in order to have an after-tax income that allows it to meet basic needs and to participate in the civic/social life of their community. ‘The Living Wage Investor Project’ aims to broaden and deepen the visibility and effectiveness of the Living Wage for Families campaign in Metro Vancouver by seeking support for paying a living wage from institutional investors (pension funds, mutual funds, investment managers, foundations and endowments). It is hoped that encouraging institutional investors to prioritize investing in companies that pay a living wage will increase the opportunities for families to earn enough income so they don’t have to face impossible choices— such as whether to buy food or heat the house, feed the children or pay the rent.
$4,000.00
2011

First Call - Moving to an Integrated System of Early Care and Learning in BC

First Call - Moving to an Integrated System of Early Care and Learning in BC
$9,500.00
2010

Federation of Canadian Artists

Beheld

The problem Beheld is trying to solve is accessibly of art for young, emerging artists. This was an issue identified by the Youth Vital Signs 2013 report as a priority area to address. Artists commonly struggle to find audiences, just as collectors struggle to discover exciting new art. Beheld allows the public to engage with emerging young artists and help them grow. Our platform offers young artists a comprehensive business tool to transact and market themselves, at the same time uses cutting edge technology to enable collectors to have a personal experience with the artwork. Our team searches where the galleries don’t to bring undiscovered original artwork to anyone with an internet connection.
$5,500.00
2014

Fireweed Collective Society

I Can Cook A to Z!

I Can Cook A to Z! works through the ingredient alphabet, introducing participants to healthy foods they may have seen in the store but never tried before. The program engages Fireweed clients and their families in 26 weekly cooking sessions, building cooking skills and increasing literacy and reading skills. It uses low-literacy cooking resources recently developed by Fireweed, and results in the publication of a cookbook and kitchen skills handbook for participants to use at home. Our target group is ages 16 to 24, particularly young parents and pregnant women. Over the past year and a half we identified that a majority of participants in our cooking and skill-building (CSB) sessions do not have basic cooking or food safety skills and have challenges reading. Each session focuses on one ingredient, and highlights cooking methods and ways to use the ingredient in other recipes. Participants will cook together, building cooking skills and developing community relationships. Sessions will include information and tips on budgeting and shopping, and end with a communal meal.
$8,150.00
2011

Food for thought Kelowna Breakfast Society

Food Preservation Project

The project is a two-fold plan. First we want to preserve as much of our summer surplus food and second, we want to create a training program for at-risk youth. First, during the spring and summer months we have access to huge amounts of produce—fruit, berries and vegetables. To ensure a steady supply of food for our breakfast program we want to can, jam and sauce the surplus. The fruit and berries will be used for fruit salad, toppings for hot oatmeal and take along snacks for nutrition break. With the help of the culinary arts program and chefs within the community we plan to preserve fruit, berries and vegetables. We will use the commercial kitchens in several local churches and halls. Secondly, we will be hiring and training at risk youth to work in kitchens and in the warehouse. The employees will receive Food Safe training, food preparation experience, warehousing skills, team building opportunities and one on one mentoring. This work experience will enable at-risk youth to be hired in kitchens and food service throughout our community.
$10,000.00
2014

Grandview-Woodland Community Policing Centre

RestART Pilot Project

With support from the City of Vancouver and the Vancouver Police Department, this two year pilot seeks to achieve sustainability for an on-going program focussing on community-involved diversion from the criminal justice system. Through victim/offender mediation, and participation in all aspects of developing and completing non-destructive public art, RestART fosters broader involvement in other community activities through mentorship. The work focuses on community engagement to address illegal graffiti. Illegal graffiti arises when a person’s efforts at completing public art transgress into destructive behaviour, for themselves as well as the community, and they have entered the criminal justice system. Related issues include: a person’s sense of isolation from the community, self-esteem, need for other health services, and lack of prosocial alternatives. A key piece of work for the pilot project is the design and completion of an evaluation incorporating the delivery priorities of a targeted long-term funder, the Federal Crime Prevention Action Fund.
$10,000.00
2014

Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia

Walking Home Yaletown Public Art

Walking Home Yaletown Public Art is an educational community art pilot project that works with a group of 12 immigrant and refugee youth, aged 15-25 with a wide variety of interests including art, broadcasting, photography, architecture, community development, urban design and social planning. The ISSofBC-sponsored pilot, the first of 3 projects happening over the next year through different organizations, seeks to build the capacity of newcomer youth through a broad civic engagement strategy. Participants will walk through the neighbourhood with creative mentors to explore neighbourhood history and learn to interpret the contemporary presence of public art in Yaletown and Coal Harbour. Integrating what they learn about Public Art with personal perspectives, youth will create responses in a variety of media including storytelling, mapping, writing, drawing, guided walks of the area, blogging and podcasts, expressing the meanings made of social and planned systems in the urban environment.
$9,250.00
2010

Moving Forward: Developing a plan for future youth engagement

For over 8 years ISSofBC has trained over 300 newly arrived immigrant and refugee youth through the highly successful Multicultural Youth Circle (MY Circle) peer facilitation training program. In 2002, a group of My Circle program graduates became committed to ongoing community development by and for immigrant and refugee youth. With the support of ISSofBC MY Circle staff, these graduates created the Action Team. The Action Team has taken on various projects over the years while continuing to support the MY Circle program and pursue their own goals. With the assistance of a consultant, ISSofBC and the Action Team want to stop and reflect on our accomplishments while clarifying our respective roles and working relationship with the purpose of developing a collaborative planning process / document for future directions/engagement.
$7,500.00
2010

Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria

Youth Voices

Through the Lens: Immigrant Youth Perspectives is a youth-led project that will train 15-20 immigrant youth on film and video on themes of anti-violence, anti-bullying and healthy relationships. Youth will be 13-15 years old. The first phase of healthy relationship training will take place over a weekend retreat in December, 2013 followed by 10 weekly training sessions from January - March, 2014. The second phase of film and video technology and production skills will take place from February - March 2014 and over five half-day sessions during school spring break. During the school spring break the youth will design, film and produce the remaining 10 podcasts. The podcasts will be aired as weekly Internet TV episodes from March-May 2014. The project will be supported by up to five youth peer mentors and the Project Coordinator. The project will run from October 2013-June 2014. This project originated from feedback from youth, teachers, community service providers and local and provincial social issues. Consultations were held with teachers, youth, community service providers.
$10,000.00
2013

Kesho Trust

Child and Nature Alliance

Child and Nature Alliance
$10,000.00
2010

KidSafe Project Society

KidSafe Food Program

Our Summer Food Program consists of providing food for up to 300 inner-city children every day during the entire eight weeks of their summer break. KidSafe provides nutritious food for breakfasts, lunches and snacks for five inner-city school program locations and hires five Food Coordinators who prepare the menus, do food preparation, provide nutritional information and do clean up at each of the KidSafe locations. We are in need of support to help offset the costs of Food Program for this summer to ensure that this service that children and families of innercity Vancouver have come to rely upon can be provided in the manner have grown accustomed to and take great comfort in. It is a small piece of their lives that provides them with some security in knowing that the children are safe and fed.
$10,000.00
2010

Pages