Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Cowichan Family Caregivers Support Society

Being Heard: A Youth Caregivers Program

This three year project is a natural extension of the successful Ending the Silence project which uncovered the challenges faced by youth caregivers. These youth courageously take on responsibilities beyond their years to care for a family member in need. They work hard to keep their families together and often feel overwhelmed because they have nowhere to turn for help. Struggling alone with the stresses of their role can adversely affect their mental and physical health, relationships, schooling, job prospects and finances. This project is the first in BC to develop a program that supports these valiant but troubled youth. The program will include: support groups; 1-on-1 emotional support; family support; work with health-care, education and social service systems to provide respite, help at school and other supports in the mainstream and First Nations communities. Two areas of focus will be outreach to youth caregivers and training for service providers. All work will be guided by a youth-led resource team of diverse youth, including caregiving youth, and mentoring adults.
$40,000.00
2012

Cowichan Valley Intercultural and Immigrant Aid Society

Compassionate Leaders

The Compassionate Leaders Project is aimed at strengthening youth leadership development and civic engagement. This includes local youth and youth who are newcomers to Canada. The project will utilize much of the CIS Inclusive Leadership curriculum in its design, skill-building, action planning and shared leadership facilitation. The project involves: 1. Networking and collaboration work with School District 79. 2. Facilitating skill workshops to 60 – 100 students in each of the five secondary schools of School District 79. The workshop is a condensed version of CIS’s locally developed ‘Inclusive Leadership Adventure’ curriculum to guide students to replace instinctive fight-flight reactions; respect differences in language, accent, dress, and appearance; use inclusive leadership skills and stand up for diversity. It is facilitated by 5 to 10 trained facilitators. 3. Hosting a two-day session of Inclusive Leadership Adventure to 50 – 80 youths from Secondary Schools of School District 79. 4. Participation and leading Walk of all Nations 2014
$18,000.00
2012

CUMBERLAND COMMUNITY SCHOOLS SOCIETY

Cumberland Skatepark

The CCSS Skatepark Committee's goal is to work with the Village of Cumberland Council and Staff, as well as the citizens of Cumberland, to construct a 6000-7000 ft2 concrete skatepark by the end of the summer of 2015. The park will be designed for skateboarders, bmx-ers and scooters, and will be built by a professional skatepark company to ensure its long lasting value to the community. The park will consist of both street and transition elements and will be focused towards beginner to intermediate users who represent the majority of the population. The skatepark will be located in Village Park, a municipal park that serves as the recreational hub of our village. The skatepark will be adjacent to a children's playground and water park, tennis courts, a basketball court and a horseshoe pitch, providing opportunities for all ages in our community to interact. The funds requested in this grant will cover the majority of professional fees for the first design phase of the project. This includes design through community engagement and results in conceptual drawings.
$10,000.00
2014

Dalai Lama Center for Peace and Education

Promoting Resiliency in Families Project

The Promoting Resiliency in Families Project grew out of the Dalai Lama Center's Heart-Mind Index pilot project. The Heart-Mind Index (HMI) is a population level measure of social/emotional development of children helping communities develop strategies to improve measures in high risk populations such as immigrant, low-income and single parent families. HMI was piloted in 6 communities in 2013. The Promoting Resiliency Project was developed to meet a clear gap in resources, training and supports identified during stakeholder dialogues. The Project will engage approximately 100 families and 60 staff from our partner agencies and family support groups. Together, we will develop and test resources, strategies, professional training and parental supports that promote and teach social and emotional development in children. The learning resources and training created during the project will be compiled in a freely accessible best practices Resource Manual that will act as blueprint for wider integration of social/emotional learning, and be a key resource in our scaling up HMI across BC
$50,000.00
2014

Delta Youth Support Line Society

YOUth Inspiring Youth ~ A Delta Youth Mental Health Project

YOUth Inspiring Youth (YIY) ~ A Delta Youth Mental Health Project will be an early intervention and mental health promotion activity. This two year capacity and legacy building project will provide youth with the opportunity to develop mental health literacy campaigns and events relevant to them. The project will provide a model for developing innovative and creative mental health wellness campaigns and events that are specifically designed to address the needs of youth. Peers provide young people with developmental opportunities and social possibilities that are not available through relationships with adults (Scholte, Van Aken, 2006). Synergies through collaborative partnerships will generate new knowledge on models of engagement that increase mental health wellness awareness through social media, online surveys, webinars, campaigns and events planned, organized and implemented by the YIY Planning Committee & School Sub-Committees for Delta youth with/without mental health challenges.
$35,000.00
2014

District of Wells

Starting Well in Wells

The idea for the Wells Community Day Care arose out of conversations among parents at the pre-school play group. The lack of child care was identified as a major hindrance to families with young children in our community. Reliable child care would allow the possibility for both parents and single parents to be part of the work force, especially in a seasonal, tourism-based economy; this is virtually impossible now as there are no options for certified child care. Meanwhile, there is a growing population of families with pre-school aged children. Our intention is to start a licensed, multi-aged (newborn to 12 years) day care facility in Wells providing safe and reliable child care. For many Wells pre-schoolers, such a centre would also provide their first regular, structured learning environment with other children and with an Early Childhood Education practitioner.
$9,250.00
2014

DIVERSEcity Community Resources Society

Sports and Me Program

Sport and Me program is a partnership project between DIVERSEcity and the City of Surrey to provide outreach, family support, and sports readiness services to multi-barriered and Government Assisted Refugee (GAR) children. The project reaches out to children with the goal to provide a safe environment where they often have their first exposure to a recreation center and rec services, and the opportunity to learn sport etiquette, language and skill. Through this route, children can feel comfortable participating in school and community sports/recreation as they understand expectations around participation. The project also provides nutritional support through teaching of healthy children’s development, nutritional snacks/meals, and link to physical health opportunities – with the goal to engage children in active living for life. The funding request to the Vancouver Foundation will allow us to expand the current program and increase participation with other multi-barriered newcomer and at-risk children.
$70,000.00
2012

Child and Youth Empowerment Camps (CYEC)

The CYEC provides a safe, supportive environment where children who have experienced/ witnessed abuse, have a mental health diagnosis or are isolated (i.e belong to marginalized communities) can share experiences, identify and talk about feelings, improve self-esteem, and enhance communication and conflict resolution skills. The CYE camps are free full-day camps, held one week at a time in schools, divided up based on age and run during school breaks (spring, summer). Nearly 200 participants attended the last spring and summer camps. The camp's innovation comes from the delivery model utilized: it uses a team approach, using staff from several different counselling and outreach programs, all of whom have different expertise they share in individual, small-group work and workshops. There is also significant time devoted to indoor and outdoor play activities and opportunities to connect with community resources. Partners in the camps include police, fire, school districts, and city recreational services. The camps have been so popular that several cities have requested them
$60,000.00
2012

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House

Family Community Kitchens

Funding will allow for a Family Community Kitchen program where nutritionally vulnerable parents and children will come together for six week sessions. Community kitchen groups will meet twice weekly to prepare dishes in large enough quantities so that participants will be able to take away multiple servings of each dish to be warmed up at later times. The program will provide an opportunity for parents to be actively involved in their child's learning in a stable and fun environment. Staff and regular guest educators will support the experience-based learning of children based on the priorities of positive parenting and nutrition. The program will alleviate hunger, nuture positive child development and provide food and nutrition education. Nutrition is very important for everyone, but it is especially important for children because it is directly linked to all aspects of their growth and development - factors which will have direct ties to their level of health as adults. Child development, hunger alleviation and education about healthy eating are the main benefits of this program.
$20,000.00
2013

Family Drop-in: Families, Farming and Food

A safe drop-in space for families in the Downtown Eastside (M-F and Sunday from 4-7pm) This program has been developed to improve the determinants of health for families and children in our community through a program emphasis on food literacy, healthy meal preparation, culinary exploration and urban farming practices. A major component to the program is that it will be based on a peer led model. Families will be recruited as both participants, but also as volunteers who will lead the program with the support of a paid coordinator to help actualize their vision within the scope of the project.
$10,000.00
2012

Early Childhood Educators of British Columbia

Implementing & Financing BC's $10/day Child Care Plan

Our project is designed to fill public education gaps and to influence child care policy in BC by building on the substantial work done to date developing and furthering consensus around the Community Plan for a Public System of Integrated Early Care and Learning & the $10/day Child Care Plan. Our public education efforts to date indicate a growing understanding of the benefits of high quality, affordable early care and learning for children, women, families, employers, the economy and society overall. However, two related questions remain: 1. As the system will take several years to build, what does an effective implementation strategy look like? 2. What revenue sources can generate the public funds necessary to implement the Plan? This project proposes to answer these questions as we increase our capacity to reach out through social media, traditional media, on-line presence, print publications, and to new audiences in our ongoing public education activities.
$40,000.00
2014

Integrating Early Care and Learning in BC

This project will build public support for a public system of integrated early care and learning that meets the needs of BC children, families and communities. In 2010, an Emerging Plan shared with thousands of British Columbians was overwhelmingly positive. In 2011 and 2012 the Project will produce a final Plan and undertake public education and community engagement activities to build awareness and support for the Plan.
$40,000.00
2011

Edward Milne Community School Society

Play and Learn Academic Intervention Program

Play and Learn is a free, 4-week day-camp for low-income or Aboriginal children ages 6 to 9 years old who are not meeting expectations for their grade level in reading and math. The idea originated from concerns over students arriving to secondary school, unprepared. Research shows a gap in the level of achievement between children from low-income and higher income students; this gap begins in early grades and compounds year after year, attributed to the accessibility of programs to stimulate learning over the summer. Aboriginal students face an additional problem of feeling excluded when their culture is not perceived to be valued in school. This play-based learning intervention program is taught in small groups. Students participate in literacy, numeracy, recreation and Aboriginal Culture activities during the morning and field trips, crafts and physical games in the afternoons. We offer healthy meals because hungry kids cannot learn. The camp is staffed by remedial education teachers. We will expand to offer a year-round Play and Learn after school program in Year two.
$20,000.00
2012

Ehattesaht Tribe

Ehattesaht Children's Playground

Ehattesaht would like to build a culturally appropriate playground as a safe place for their children to play. This project is being undertaken with the full support of the Ehattesaht Chief and Council and through an an Aboriginal Leadership Initiative called Ahp-cii-uk. The main Ehattesaht reserve is small, with barely enough land for the 15 buildings on the reserve. The community is on Zeballos Inlet but cut off from access to the water by a busy logging road. Children not only cross the road to get to the water but they also play on it because they have no safe alternative. The Chief and Council have approved a site for the playground in the main part of the village, adjacent to the Youth Centre that will also eventually house a Headstart program to increase children’s success in, and attachment to, school. One of the requirements of Headstart is a fenced playground. Chief and Council have also purchased some playground equipmentwhich can be used. The project will result in a safe place for Ehattesaht children to play and contribute to social development activities.
$10,000.00
2011

Encompass Support Services Society

Program Coordination and Enhancement for 0-6 Services

This project will address the recent EDI results in the Langley Communities by providing some coordination of programs to further enhance our Aldergrove programs as well as expand programs to a growing neighbourhood in Langley (Willoughby). Utilizing the successes of our programs in Aldergrove and Langley, we would like to support the Langley community planning process through enhancement of services to areas where population growth is occurring. In Willoughby specifically, we would be mirroring services through our prenatal nutrition services, outreach and family resource programs, and aim to partner with an immunization clinic once a week. With expansion of programs and Willoughby being designated as a growing are of need, this coordinator would help develop and enhance a direct service hub within the Willoughby area. By providing nutritional support, it would enhance our Aldergrove Services creating a focus on healthy living.
$40,000.00
2013

Environmental Youth Alliance

Sustain

‘Sustain’ is a project that uses new media as a platform to engage marginalized youth in environmental and social justice issues and empowers them to become active participants in systemic change through sharing their visions with their community. Ten youth will receive intensive training in diversity, media, communications, and then work on new media endeavours that build awareness.
$25,000.00
2011

Equitas - International Centre

Speaking Rights - a participatory human rights education toolkit for BC Youth

Speaking Rights is a human rights education project that engages 13-17 year olds in exploring issues that are important to them as they work together to identify strategies to address discrimination, bullying and exclusion. Through Speaking Rights youth workers and youth are trained on the Speaking Rights Toolkit which is an innovative tool which supports and develops the leadership skills of youth by strengthening their knowledge, skills, values, behavior and attitudes. Youth participate in activities and community projects from the Toolkit which open up a space for dialogue and action on issues such as participation, leadership, active citizenship; self-esteem and relationships; violence and intimidation; rights and responsibilities; gender roles; and exclusion, discrimination and racism. The current toolkit is based on a needs assessment conducted with youth and youth workers in Montreal. With the recent success of this project in Montreal, Equitas partners in BC have asked Equitas to adapt the toolkit to meet the Vancouver context and the needs of youth workers and youth in BC.
$10,000.00
2011

Family Services of Greater Vancouver

Promoting Upstream Solutions for BC's Children and Youth

Working closely with our coalition partner organizations, First Call will undertake to strengthen and support the collective voice for the rights and well-being of BC's children and youth. The project will use 3 strategies, public education (including conducting research and disseminating/popularizing others' research), mobilizing communities and individuals through workshops, presentations, media work, toolkits, web resources, e-alerts, etc.) and direct public policy advocacy in collaboration with our partner organizations and communities (briefs, letters, reports, candidate surveys, convening/facilitating discussions among advocates and with decision-makers and policy 'influencers'). Some of the key issues these activities will address are the unacceptably high rates of child and family poverty in BC and our proposed solutions, the need for improved protections for children in BC's labour force, the need to reduce exposures to environmental toxins affecting children's health, and the crucial importance of increasing our investments in early childhood and supporting young families.
$100,000.00
2012

The Living Wage Investor Project

In Britain, the United States and now in Canada there is increasing support for a ‘living wage’ as a way to ensure that families have enough income to support themselves to develop in a healthy and socially inclusive way. The living wage is about what a family with children would need to earn in order to have an after-tax income that allows it to meet basic needs and to participate in the civic/social life of their community. ‘The Living Wage Investor Project’ aims to broaden and deepen the visibility and effectiveness of the Living Wage for Families campaign in Metro Vancouver by seeking support for paying a living wage from institutional investors (pension funds, mutual funds, investment managers, foundations and endowments). It is hoped that encouraging institutional investors to prioritize investing in companies that pay a living wage will increase the opportunities for families to earn enough income so they don’t have to face impossible choices— such as whether to buy food or heat the house, feed the children or pay the rent.
$4,000.00
2011

Stay at Home - A Project to Keep Famlies in our Community

Family Services of Greater Vancouver plans to develop and operate a 10-bed emergency shelter for homeless women and their dependent children in Richmond, BC, in collaboration with the City of Richmond, CHIMO Crisis Services and the Richmond Women’s Resource Centre. The City of Richmond has provided a house and they are negotiating with BC Housing for operating funds. They seek support in order to provide services to residents of the shelter, including an outreach worker/housing advocate who will help residents find and maintain housing.
$68,200.00
2010

First Call - Moving to an Integrated System of Early Care and Learning in BC

First Call - Moving to an Integrated System of Early Care and Learning in BC
$9,500.00
2010

Federation of Canadian Artists

Beheld

The problem Beheld is trying to solve is accessibly of art for young, emerging artists. This was an issue identified by the Youth Vital Signs 2013 report as a priority area to address. Artists commonly struggle to find audiences, just as collectors struggle to discover exciting new art. Beheld allows the public to engage with emerging young artists and help them grow. Our platform offers young artists a comprehensive business tool to transact and market themselves, at the same time uses cutting edge technology to enable collectors to have a personal experience with the artwork. Our team searches where the galleries don’t to bring undiscovered original artwork to anyone with an internet connection.
$5,500.00
2014

Fireweed Collective Society

I Can Cook A to Z!

I Can Cook A to Z! works through the ingredient alphabet, introducing participants to healthy foods they may have seen in the store but never tried before. The program engages Fireweed clients and their families in 26 weekly cooking sessions, building cooking skills and increasing literacy and reading skills. It uses low-literacy cooking resources recently developed by Fireweed, and results in the publication of a cookbook and kitchen skills handbook for participants to use at home. Our target group is ages 16 to 24, particularly young parents and pregnant women. Over the past year and a half we identified that a majority of participants in our cooking and skill-building (CSB) sessions do not have basic cooking or food safety skills and have challenges reading. Each session focuses on one ingredient, and highlights cooking methods and ways to use the ingredient in other recipes. Participants will cook together, building cooking skills and developing community relationships. Sessions will include information and tips on budgeting and shopping, and end with a communal meal.
$8,150.00
2011

Food for thought Kelowna Breakfast Society

Food Preservation Project

The project is a two-fold plan. First we want to preserve as much of our summer surplus food and second, we want to create a training program for at-risk youth. First, during the spring and summer months we have access to huge amounts of produce—fruit, berries and vegetables. To ensure a steady supply of food for our breakfast program we want to can, jam and sauce the surplus. The fruit and berries will be used for fruit salad, toppings for hot oatmeal and take along snacks for nutrition break. With the help of the culinary arts program and chefs within the community we plan to preserve fruit, berries and vegetables. We will use the commercial kitchens in several local churches and halls. Secondly, we will be hiring and training at risk youth to work in kitchens and in the warehouse. The employees will receive Food Safe training, food preparation experience, warehousing skills, team building opportunities and one on one mentoring. This work experience will enable at-risk youth to be hired in kitchens and food service throughout our community.
$10,000.00
2014

Fraser Valley Child Development Centre

CALM Early Learning Initiative

The CALM Early Learning Curriculum was developed in 2013 to address the 2012/13 Early Development Instrument (HELP,UBC) results, and is based on Dr. Stuart Shanker's renowned self-regulation research (Calm Alert Learning Modules and Classroom Strategies for Self Regulation), and adapted for children in the early years. The CALM Early Learning Initiative is evidence based and outcome measured,and is a 3 tiered program. CALM Early Learning Groups (Stage 1) have been piloted over the past 15 months by FVCDC, in collaboration with regional School Districts, as well as several preschools. The impact and response to the CALM program has exploded in the past six months with an overwhelming amount of early childhood learning environments signing up to have the groups in their classrooms during 2014-2015. Stage 2 is in its development stage and includes additional emotions modules which are more complex and for those classrooms who have already completed stage 1. This will be piloted January 2015. Stage 3 is in its preliminary stages of planning and will encompass a parent component.
$15,000.00
2014

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