Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Friend 2 Friend Social Learning Society

Friend 2 Friend Play Centre for Children with Autism

The project will develop and provide new state-of-the-art intervention programs at a new permanent site in Vancouver called The Friend 2 Friend Play Centre. The programs will continue to be offered on a year round basis following the project. The project will provide programs tailored to the unique needs of pre-school aged children ages 3 through 5, as well as highly specialized Friend 2 Friend - Integrated Play Group Programs for children ages 6 through 12. The project will serve approximately 50-75 children with autism or related special needs annually, as well as 150 of their peers and siblings and their parents and caregivers. In particular, the project will develop and offer the following ongoing programs, with each program consisting of 10-20 scheduled sessions: For pre-school aged children and their parents / caregivers: a. Parent Participation Play Groups Program b. Early Childhood Play Groups Program For school aged children and their typically developing peers: a. Out of School Play Groups Program b. Saturday Play Groups Program c. Summer Camp Play Groups Program
$25,000.00
2012

Girls Action Foundation

Creating a BC network of girls' programs

This project will offer networking and skill-building activities that will allow 40 community groups to collaborate year-round. It will implement outreach, workshops, online communication mechanisms and best practices sharing for these organizations. Two partner organizations will offer programs for Aboriginal and racialised girls and young women in their communities.
$31,000.00
2011

Gitanmaax Band Council

Youth on Water (YOW!)

The mandate of the Youth on Water! (YOW!) is to educate, empower and engage youth, with a focus on youth at risk, from communities of the Skeena Watershed. We do this by conservation education, job skills training and healthy physical activity during five-day rafting programs on local rivers with certified guides. There are three main goals of the YOW! Program: i) provide a dependable, safe and supportive recreational opportunity with a strong leadership component for Hazelton area youth who are considered at risk and/or marginalized within their family or social situations, ii) provide critical support in the development of the region's future stewards and conservation leaders across geographic and ethnic communities, and iii) educate local youth with regard to the character, location, ecology and diversity of their local river ecosystems. The positive that we have seen in young people attending YOW! has a positive effect on their families and the wider community, including aspects of school life. YOW! was developed by SWCC as a pilot program in Hazelton in 2009.
$60,000.00
2013

Gitga'at First Nation

Aboriginal Youth Media Arts Training in Hartley Bay

The proposed 2-year project, 'One Foot in the Past, One Foot in the Future: Aboriginal Youth Media Arts Training in Hartley Bay' will be part of the Young Gitga’at Guardian Program, and will harness and build on youth interest in multimedia projects. The project will provide the skills and motivation necessary to inspire intergenerational learning and improve intercommunity relations. Between 2013-2015 we will empower youth with the skills necessary to employ modern storytelling techniques to capture age-old teachings and traditions. Using photography and film to engage Gitga’at youth with elders and knowledgeable community members presents a novel opportunity to bridge various intergenerational approaches to cultural learning. Gitga'at elders are increasingly unable to participate in cultural harvests and other activities within the territory and thus inhibited in their ability to pass on cultural knowledge and traditions. The proposed project will ensure that important Gitga'at teachings are documented for the benefit of present and future generations.
$30,000.00
2013

Global Youth Education Network Society

Frontrunner Young Women's Campaign School

To increase the number of women in politics we need to get more women to run. To get more women to run, we need to get them in the habit of campaigning and running for office - or at least thinking about campaigning and running for office when they are young. Frontrunner is a campaign school and support network for young women that will train and support 18-24 year olds to participate in elections at the college and university campus level. The program will bring together seasoned instructors who have previous electoral campaign experience and who have been elected to student government. Participants will leave with the necessary skills and support to confidently enter electoral races. In order to reinforce a culture where it is clear that women should be involved in political office, Frontrunner will also establish a support network for alumni that will encourage young women to engage in political circles and participate in political dialogue through events and hands-on experience.
$30,000.00
2014

Golden Community Resources Society

Golden Youth Engagement Project

The Golden Youth Engagement project is a collaborative youth-lead project that enhances opportunities for youth and strengthens the links between youth and the community. This project aims to empower youth to be leaders in our community and enhance civic engagement opportunities for youth. The Golden Youth Engagement project will operate out of the newly created Golden Youth Centre. The Youth Center will create formal and informal engagement opportunities between the community and youth and serve as a bridge between youth and the community. Key community organizations have committed to providing in-kind staff support to engage with youth out of the Youth Centre by committing to working or volunteering at of the Youth Centre one evening per month as well as co-facilitating workshops and activities with youth and youth centre staff.
$50,000.00
2012

Grandview-Woodland Community Policing Centre

RestART Pilot Project

With support from the City of Vancouver and the Vancouver Police Department, this two year pilot seeks to achieve sustainability for an on-going program focussing on community-involved diversion from the criminal justice system. Through victim/offender mediation, and participation in all aspects of developing and completing non-destructive public art, RestART fosters broader involvement in other community activities through mentorship. The work focuses on community engagement to address illegal graffiti. Illegal graffiti arises when a person’s efforts at completing public art transgress into destructive behaviour, for themselves as well as the community, and they have entered the criminal justice system. Related issues include: a person’s sense of isolation from the community, self-esteem, need for other health services, and lack of prosocial alternatives. A key piece of work for the pilot project is the design and completion of an evaluation incorporating the delivery priorities of a targeted long-term funder, the Federal Crime Prevention Action Fund.
$10,000.00
2014

HIPPY Canada (Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters)

Training and Support for the HIPPY HUB Model Innovation in British Columbia

The Hub Model Innovation is a reconfiguration of the HIPPY program’s current delivery mechanism, is more cost-effective (than the traditional HIPPY Model), organizationally efficient, and has an increased emphasis on employment training for mothers in the second and third years of the program along with enhanced labour market partnership. The Hub Model consist of two organizational components: a central office and up to ten (10) satellite pods in different communities. Working under the supervision of the Manager of Multicultural Programs, the position of the Local Training Coordinator would be to support the new site at MOSAIC. He/she will: develop and design local specific training modules to meet the needs of the home visitors and parents: support the Coordinator in implementing HIPPY; implement the transition planning process for home visitors - a structured plan to move them into higher education and/or other employment and together with the Local Program Coordinator make recommendations to the Scholarship Fund for Home Visitors about who is ready to enrol in higher education
$25,000.00
2012

Huu-ay-aht First Nations

Port Alberni Paawats (Language Nest)

This program delivers the Nuu-chah-nulth language to children by engaging preschoolers, their parents and elders. It is based on the principle that the best way to acquire a second language is the same way that children acquire a first language: immersion rather than the traditional teaching-learning situation. By involving elders, this program fits well with Aboriginal views of teaching children while building pride in their culture and heritage. They want to build on the success of the program they have on their reserve by creating a second program in Port Alberni.
$30,000.00
2010

Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia

MY Circle Transitions: Enhanced Newcomer Leadership Training

This project will develop and deliver 8-10 training modules for immigrant and refugee youth leaders in areas youth have identified including conflict resolution skills, LGBTQ/migrant identities, migration, multiculturalism and indigenous perspectives. Curriculum will be developed in the first year and delivered, evaluated and fine tuned in the second and third years, with a target of training 40 newcomer youth.
$90,000.00
2011

Walking Home Yaletown Public Art

Walking Home Yaletown Public Art is an educational community art pilot project that works with a group of 12 immigrant and refugee youth, aged 15-25 with a wide variety of interests including art, broadcasting, photography, architecture, community development, urban design and social planning. The ISSofBC-sponsored pilot, the first of 3 projects happening over the next year through different organizations, seeks to build the capacity of newcomer youth through a broad civic engagement strategy. Participants will walk through the neighbourhood with creative mentors to explore neighbourhood history and learn to interpret the contemporary presence of public art in Yaletown and Coal Harbour. Integrating what they learn about Public Art with personal perspectives, youth will create responses in a variety of media including storytelling, mapping, writing, drawing, guided walks of the area, blogging and podcasts, expressing the meanings made of social and planned systems in the urban environment.
$9,250.00
2010

Moving Forward: Developing a plan for future youth engagement

For over 8 years ISSofBC has trained over 300 newly arrived immigrant and refugee youth through the highly successful Multicultural Youth Circle (MY Circle) peer facilitation training program. In 2002, a group of My Circle program graduates became committed to ongoing community development by and for immigrant and refugee youth. With the support of ISSofBC MY Circle staff, these graduates created the Action Team. The Action Team has taken on various projects over the years while continuing to support the MY Circle program and pursue their own goals. With the assistance of a consultant, ISSofBC and the Action Team want to stop and reflect on our accomplishments while clarifying our respective roles and working relationship with the purpose of developing a collaborative planning process / document for future directions/engagement.
$7,500.00
2010

Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria

Youth Voices

Through the Lens: Immigrant Youth Perspectives is a youth-led project that will train 15-20 immigrant youth on film and video on themes of anti-violence, anti-bullying and healthy relationships. Youth will be 13-15 years old. The first phase of healthy relationship training will take place over a weekend retreat in December, 2013 followed by 10 weekly training sessions from January - March, 2014. The second phase of film and video technology and production skills will take place from February - March 2014 and over five half-day sessions during school spring break. During the school spring break the youth will design, film and produce the remaining 10 podcasts. The podcasts will be aired as weekly Internet TV episodes from March-May 2014. The project will be supported by up to five youth peer mentors and the Project Coordinator. The project will run from October 2013-June 2014. This project originated from feedback from youth, teachers, community service providers and local and provincial social issues. Consultations were held with teachers, youth, community service providers.
$10,000.00
2013

International Institute for Child Rights and Development

Hear the Child Education Project

The Project will serve BC children, youth and their families, professionals providing non-therapeutic child interviews in family cases, and legal professionals who need their services to implement BC law. It will start a non-profit society that promotes professional education for non-therapeutic child interviewers, where BC families and legal professionals can learn about a service available to them to support children and youth; and where BC children and youth are given an opportunity to share their views with qualified interviewers where their best interests are determined.
$35,000.00
2011

James Bay Health and Community James Bay Community Project

Creative Play Drop-In - Immigrant Outreach

The James Bay Community Project currently provides Drop-Ins for parents and their young children (0-5 years) at our Family Centre. The free programs provide enjoyable activities while facilitating the development of supportive social networks for both parents and children and promoting participation in community life. They also provide an accessible and non-threatening 'gateway' or entry program for families to access community-based support services and health care, including other programs at JBCP. Increasing numbers of immigrant families in our community require access to these kinds of programs and face unique challenges in attempting to do so. We want to increase accessibility of the programs for immigrant families, and improve our ability to support their learning and integration through collaboration with the Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria (ICA). ICA will assist JBCP understand immigrants' needs and assist with interpreting, translation of promotional materials, mentoring our staff, etc.).
$29,844.00
2012

Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society

A Place of Belonging

Metis Nation British Columbia (MNBC), Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society (KAFS) and Lii Michif Otipemisiwak Family and Community Services (LMO) have collaborated on this joint project with the focus on providing innovative safe supportive housing for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth in Kamloops 19 - 24 yrs of age and who are/have transitioned out of care of the child welfare system or who are currently homeless. We will first address issues of cultural identity, sense of belonging and self-esteem by providing supportive living arrangements for vulnerable Aboriginal Youth. This grounds our Aboriginal youth in culture and spiritual support, while simultaneously providing a safe place to stay. The Youth will then be better equipped with tools to grow into productive young members of society, provided with distinctly individual pathways available to them. This unique housing arrangement will be a starting place for youth to develop life skills while learning healthy skills with positive strong paths forward. Aboriginal Youth are disconnected from their Communities and require a strong sense of security in ones-self, to successfully transition into functional young Aboriginal adults. Aboriginal Youth need to start at square one, which involves finding out who they are, what their culture is and what it means to them and having pride in their sense of identity.
$100,000.00
2015

Kamloops Family Resources Society

Mothers for Recovery Mentorship Program

This project addresses the addiction issues of mothers and pregnant women with peer support through weekly workshops run alternatively between professionals and mentors. This program directly benefits the community at large, increases use of existing services, decreases the risks of child apprehension and fills a need unmet by other service providers.
$40,000.00
2011

Kesho Trust

Child and Nature Alliance

Child and Nature Alliance
$10,000.00
2010

KidSafe Project Society

KidSafe Food Program

Our Summer Food Program consists of providing food for up to 300 inner-city children every day during the entire eight weeks of their summer break. KidSafe provides nutritious food for breakfasts, lunches and snacks for five inner-city school program locations and hires five Food Coordinators who prepare the menus, do food preparation, provide nutritional information and do clean up at each of the KidSafe locations. We are in need of support to help offset the costs of Food Program for this summer to ensure that this service that children and families of innercity Vancouver have come to rely upon can be provided in the manner have grown accustomed to and take great comfort in. It is a small piece of their lives that provides them with some security in knowing that the children are safe and fed.
$10,000.00
2010

Kitasoo Kitasoo Band Council

Learning from our past to ensure the resilience of our future

The proposed Kitasoo/Xai'xais project is designed to revive our culture, engage our youth and inspire intergenerational learning for the benefit of current and future generations. The project was designed through ongoing dialogue within our community and within the broader community of First Nations people, who are collectively facing and dealing with the loss of important cultural knowledge and an eroded sense of identity. Through a series of community led cultural workshops and activity groups we hope to pass on the knowledge, skills and practices fundamental to Kitasoo/Xai'xais identity. In doing so we, will encourage our youth, their families, and the community as a whole to understand that cultural revitalization requires participation. Through this project we will create opportunities for participation that might otherwise not exist for certain individuals or families. We will document this knowledge through mixed media so as to ensure the preservation of this valuable information and the resilience of our community.
$40,000.00
2014

Kiwassa Neighbourhood Services Association

Food Skills Capacity Building

The project will engage and train at-risk children, youth and parents in community food security (life skills, leadership, food safe, food preparation, cooking and healthy nutrition). Three neighbourhood single parents will be trained and employed as part time kitchen trainees to help prepare and cook nutritious food for residents involved in Kiwassa programs. The trainees will be supported to find entry level employment in the hospitality industry, leading to increased financial security.
$35,000.00
2011

Ladysmith Family and Friends (LaFF)

LaFF Around Town - Connecting Families to Services and Strengthening Belonging

The idea behind LaFF Around Town is to consistently provide LaFF programming on weekends and evenings and in locations throughout the community to provide multiple points of access to be inclusive of as many families as possible. The idea originated through consultation with families who expressed the desire to strengthen their connection to the community, and through feedback from service providers showing that some vulnerable families were not accessing services. We will create a quarterly Calendar of Events promoting all local events for children ages 0-6 and their families hosted by LaFF and other member agencies of the Ladysmith Early Years Partnership (LEYP). The Calendar will be inserted into every Leisure Guide published and distributed by the Town of Ladysmith and will be inserted into other local print media. The Calendar will also be distributed through LaFF’s electronic newsletter, posted on our website, Facebook and in other social media as appropriate to ensure maximum access to community-based programs and services by the broadest possible audience of families.
$10,000.00
2012

Building Capacity and Continuity Through Volunteerism

LaFF’s Volunteer Program is designed to strengthen and enhance our Family Resource Program and provide opportunities for growth and a sense of belonging to individuals in the community. Ladysmith is filled with people who are looking for ways to meaningfully connect and build a richer community in which to belong. With 15 years of community building history, LaFF has grown into a leader, and not only young families, but people of all ages and backgrounds are turning to LaFF for opportunities to engage and participate in our community. The Volunteer Program will allow LaFF to formalize and strengthen our existing volunteer activities, building on our relationships with senior and youth volunteers, forming connections between and within social networks and generations. The strength, vibrancy and sustainability of our work with children and their families will increase in the process, as intergenerational understanding and learning opportunities become part of our everyday operations and our pool of stakeholders and participants increases and diversifies.
$10,000.00
2011

Langley Community Services Society

Langley Neighbourhood Development Project

Over the past year, senior managers of Langley non-profit and Government service providers have worked together to develop an overarching strategic plan for services based on demographic data, community parent surveys and input from youth, early childhood, special needs and middle childhood groups. This strategic plan was developed and reviewed by staff working in the community, and representatives of the faith, Aboriginal and multicultural communities. Our next steps are to engage the broader community (e.g. business and other community groups) as well as parents and youth to complete an asset inventory. We will engage neighbourhood to discuss local and community assets and how to best fill immediate gaps for children, youth and families. We are requesting funding tol support this process and start up of services.
$30,000.00
2012

Living Positive Resource Centre, Okanagan

The Bright Side Youth Project

The social innovation idea we would like to move on with Vancouver Foundation development funds is to explore in partnership with community agencies the recent social innovations in youth sexual health programming. We aim to determine the best program for reaching vulnerable Okanagan youth and how we can build and manage strategic and institutional partnerships to bring any identified program development to sustainable fruition. We want to identify a recent social innovation idea in the delivery of youth-based sexual health prevention programs that has been successful in other regions and that could be modified into an innovative program in the Okanagan. The coming together to develop programming for Okanagan youth is in and of itself an innovative step for this community.
$10,000.00
2015

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