Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Lower Mainland Purpose Society for Youth and Families

Burnaby Youth Hub - Headspace Initiative

The Burnaby Youth Hub (“the Hub”) improves access to youth-centric services by offering a unique one-stop shop of services in a safe and empowering environment. In collaboration with a number of other partners, the Hub functions to provide young people with the opportunity and access to a comprehensive set of resources to foster a productive future as independent, engaged members of the community. In order to continue to provide innovative support that is responsive to the unique and varied needs of the young people in our community, the Hub will be launching a new framework of integrative care specifically addressing and de-stigmatizing mental health among youth. Modeled after the Australian Headspace initiative, this new approach will build off of existing foundations to better serve the needs of youth in Burnaby, as identified and articulated by the youth requiring and accessing these services. This innovative new framework will see greater focus on building holistic, compassionate, and inclusive services in a centralized design, structured around four core pillars: mental health, physical & sexual health, capacity-building (including education and employment skills), and advocacy. Under this new initiative, the voices and experiences of young people will be included throughout the process of program design and implementation, and the self-identified needs of youth in the community will drive the nature of the services provided at the Hub.
$100,000.00
2015

Burnaby Youth Hub Support Project

The Burnaby Youth Hub opened in 2010 to give vulnerable youth easier access to educational, health and therapeutic services. A range of services previously scattered throughout Burnaby are now offered in one warm and welcoming location. Your support would help maintain the position of a Coordinator to facilitate this one-stop shop of services. Services are offered by individual agencies and organizations that collaborate to customize support for youth with multiple needs. These youth are not connected to the community and the Hub offers them opportunities for better life chances, greater economic independence and ensures they are living out of harms way. Services include an educational program, clinic, youth centre, counselling and job readiness and skills training and other services. Government, non-profit and community agencies work together to help each youth reach their potential. The Coordinator supports youth, service providers and staff, provides oversight of the network of agencies at the Hub, attends to physical plant issues and promotes the Hub to the community.
$60,000.00
2012

Burnaby Youth Services Hub Support Project

The Burnaby Youth Hub provides educational, health and therapeutic services to vulnerable youth with complex needs who are not connected to the community through school or work. Services include an educational program, a youth clinic, and a youth centre. The Hub also offers counselling services, job readiness and skills training. This project will assist with staffing costs to provide oversight of the network of agencies that work at the Hub and promote the Hub to the community.
$30,000.00
2011

Lush Valley Food Action Society

Young Cooks Caring

In a welcoming and nurturing environment, our project will work with children and youth who have a parent with a mental illness/dual diagnosis. These families with complex needs may be involved with a range of mental health and social services, but nothing is available specifically for the children of these families and their unique needs. One typical challenge these children face is role reversal – when a child acts as a parent, an example is grocery shopping and cooking when Mom is not feeling well. They may feel shamed into silence about their parent’s condition, feeling alone and isolated because of the stigma and prejudices surrounding mental illness. This program will provide these children an opportunity to explore the local food system and develop cooking skills while enjoying the companionship of children from a similar background. There will be 7-10 participants per growing and harvesting season (youth ranging from 11-16 years old).
$14,000.00
2012

McCreary Centre Society

2013 BC Adolescent Health Survey Next Steps Project

In 2013, 29,832 students aged 12-19, in 56 of BC's 59 school districts completed the fifth BC Adolescent Health Survey(BC AHS). The survey provides the most current and accurate picture of youth health in the province. The results are used by government, public health agencies, schools and parents to measure progress in the area of youth health, and to develop appropriate policies and programs. McCreary prioritizes returning the results to youth, and supporting them to advance their knowledge and make informed decisions about their health. The results are also used to raise awareness among BC youth about the roles of risk and protective factors in their lives. This proposal aims to take the results of the survey back to youth in four communities per year over two years through a Next Steps project(Total 8 communities). The Next Steps is an award winning workshop series which uses the survey results to engage youth in developing and delivering sustainable local youth health projects. The project will engage approx. 15-20 core youth participants per community in the workshop series
$30,600.00
2014

Promoting the healthy development of youth through sports involvement

Since 1992, McCreary Centre Society has conducted the Adolescent Health Survey, which provides current and comprehensive data on health of BC youth. The Society believes a study on sports involvement would greatly contribute to the health and well-being of BC youth. They would conduct an in-depth analysis of sports participation using 2008 Adolescent Health Survey data. Then, the Society would use the results to deliver workshops that give youth the opportunity to discuss ways to improve youth health in their communities.
$25,000.00
2010

Motivate Canada

ACTIVATE Vancouver

ACTIVATE Vancouver will be led by a team of local youth (ACTIVATORS) who are or will be trained to facilitate an ACTIVATE Vancouver Forum. The 4 day Youth-Led Forum will bring together 8 teams of 4 youth between the ages of 16-22. Youth participating in the Forum will be recruited by MoreSports, and will participate in workshops that provide them with the tools and skills to lead a community project. These workshops include: Goal Setting, Community and Life Mapping, Networking, Sport4Dev, Action Planning, Youth Driven Development and Physical Literacy. After the Forum teams of youth will deliver a 4-6 month program in MoreSports Community Hubs. The project is the youths' opportunity to take the lead and engage other youth in their community and help them make positive change and healthy choices in their lives by: increasing their physical activity, healthy living knowledge, self-esteem and sense of connection to peers and community, and to help them realize their potential and leadership abilities. Youth will use the tools and curriculum provided by Motivate Canada
$30,000.00
2014

Multi-Lingual Orientation Service Association for Immigrant Communities

NuYu Popular Theatre Project

The NuYu program seeks to share our model with more people, most importantly with more immigrant and refugee youth. To do this we realize community capacity building is the best way, to train more youth workers and youth leaders in Popular Theatre(PT) Facilitation so more communities can benefit from this creative, transformative & effective methodology. In order to achieve this, the NuYu Project will partner with an existing youth program in the city of Vancouver to build community capacity through a PT Facilitation Training for youth/community workers and youth leaders serving immigrant communities. Furthermore, we will also work with this partner program to collaboratively deliver PT programming by and for immigrant and refugee youth, thereby strengthening the existing programs' effectiveness as well as building the sustainability of community theatre for immigrant communities in Metro Vancouver. In this way, participants & partners will be able to continue using PT on their own as an excellent tool for working with immigrant and refugee youth. (As achieved in New Westminster).
$40,000.00
2012

Multicultural Helping House Society

MHHS Youth Buddy Program

This comprehensive service innovation program brings out the imagination, passion and dynamism of the young participants to develop a positive self-concept that will boost self-confidence, effective social interaction and communication skills, team-building skills, leadership abilities, community service trait and personal responsibilities be it in school or at home. Key elements of the program include experiential activities, peer coaching sessions, service learning activities, indoor workshops, family outreach, parent education, mental, emotional and behavioural health consultations, referrals, elder dialogue, open forum with politicians, drug rehabilitation and alcoholism centres information sessions and visitations.
$15,000.00
2012

Multifaith Action Society of B.C. (MAS)

Connection Through Spirit

Connection Through Spirit is a dynamic and interactive series of four youth-led interfaith dialogue forums culminating in a unique, all-inclusive 'un-conference' exploring our connection to Self, Family, Community, and Earth through spirituality. The purpose of this project is to provide youth of diverse cultural and spiritual backgrounds with opportunities to reflect upon and share with others the value of spiritual awareness, practice and tradition in the process of connecting to these four aspects of society. By engaging young people in intercultural and intergenerational dialogue on topics that are important to them, we hope to address the pervasive sense of disconnection and isolation that has become so endemic in modern secular society, build bridges between and within faith communities, and create constructive collaborations.
$25,000.00
2013

Nanaimo Science and Sustainability Society

Science on the Move-Early Years

NS3’s Science on the Move-Early Years programs will be series of science outreach programs specifically for children ages 0-7 delivered through our mobile science van. This outreach will engage children and families via experiments, hands-on activities, and traveling educators. The idea for mobile science outreach originated during NS3’s vision workshop (fall 2011) where local stakeholders and NS3 identified community needs and the action steps to address those needs. NS3 then gathered more than 30 scientists to generate local themes and activities for NS3’s place-based science outreach, and partnered with the City of Nanaimo’s Parks, Recreation and Culture to deliver 36 free science outreach programs this summer (Science in the Park). Science in the Park successfully reached 1,600 kids, many who would not be able to afford similar education. Based on program feedback, NS3 identified a new target audience for fun science-based programs, families with young children. Science on the Move-Early Years will provide hands-on science to 1,500 children in 2013.
$20,000.00
2012

NEED2 Suicide Prevention Education and Support

Expanding the Safety Net-the Middle Grades

NEED2 is proposing to investigate and develop an evidence and outcome based school based peer support program for the "middle years" that would empower young people to support each other and contribute positively to society. In our in-school work around suicide, we have been discussing for some time a developmentally appropriate approach for Grades 6-7 that will address the issues that contribute to suicidal thoughts and suicide. This project would support the development of a peer involved approach to enhance the mental, social and emotional well-being of young people. It would address mental wellness, and provide for supports and skills to address issues like suicide, bullying, addictions and mental illness.
$28,000.00
2014

Youthspace.ca

Youthspace.ca is a safe, moderated online service offering emotional support, crisis intervention, and information to youth in Greater Victoria. It provides a staff moderated forum, private one-to-one chats and the option of e-mailing a counsellor directly. It supports youth experiencing mental health, addictions and/or other crises with referral information and acts as a bridge to other local services. The program also engages Victoria youth as volunteers in a significant way in their community by providing volunteer training and a direct way to support their peers.
$71,000.00
2011

Neighbourlink Vanderhoof

Best Moms and Dads Program

Activities are participant generated and a broad range of free literacy tutoring is provided. (Financial literacy, math, reading and cultural activities). The program is innovative, grassroots, and flexible enough to meet clients where they are in their lives. Program structure, outcomes, and goals are different for each participant depending on their need. While the small group size allows us to offer individual education plans in a group setting, the focus for all participants is parenting, budgeting, nutrition, lifestyle choices and literacy. Local groups involved in early education programs realise that those who most need their services are not accessing them. A need for 'pre-programming' targetting young, single mothers (or fathers) of (mainly) aboriginal ancestry was identified. Many participants are the second or third generation of unemployed, marginalized, under‐educated, impoverished people locked into a seemingly unbreakable cycle of poverty.
$20,000.00
2012

Best Moms and Dads Program

Activities are participant generated and a broad range (financial, math, reading)of free literacy tutoring is provided. The program is innovative, grassroots, and flexible enough to meet clients where they are at. Program structure, outcomes, and goals are different for each participant depending on their need. While the small group size allows us to offer individual education plans in a group setting, the focus for all participants is parenting, budgeting, nutrition, lifestyle choices and literacy. Transportation to and from provided by Saik’uz First Nation drivers, and two First Nations women hired as co-coordinators. Activities: Creative learning and crafting sessions. Dreaming a Dream: Many participants don’t believe it is possible for them to have a better life. Using scrapbooking, individuals develop a dream, break it into goals, turn goals into steps. Craft Sale Table – creation of goods, marketing, entrepreneurship, confidence building Self-esteem building through creative expression (Moccasin Making, Shoulder Bags, Scrapbooking)
$10,000.00
2011

North Kootenay Lake Community Services Society

Boys' Town

The population the Boys' Town Project would serve is boys aged 8 to 12 yrs old - providing them with supportive, positive activities with safe adult male mentors. Kaslo has a significant number of boys this age with special needs, who are attention seeking, often female single parented, and generally lacking a positive male presence in their lives. This project will build upon a 2011-2012 pilot project that demonstrated that using positive adult-child relationships to strengthen attachment and resilience and removing barriers to activities (e.g. financial, social) to increase social inclusion and healthy activity, has a positive effect on boys. Starting January 2013, we intend to increase the engagement of 8 to 12 yr. old at-risk boys in weekly mentored transformative activities in an after-school setting. Boys will be assisted to create personal plans. To improve the capacity of our community to successfully mentor boys, the project coordinator will facilitate a series of mentor training workshops and provide follow-up mentor support, connecting safe adult mentors with at-risk boys.
$15,000.00
2012

Northern Family Health Society

Mothers for Recovery Peer Mentoring Project

This project is a women centered, peer driven initiative that offers support, encouragement, awareness in personal journeys and mentoring for mothers struggling with addiction. It aims to enhance the group by providing bi-weekly mentorship workshops for the mothers, including resources and wages for two senior mothers in recovery to facilitate one mentoring workshop a week. The second workshop every week will be facilitated by community professionals on various topics pertaining to the recovery process.
$40,000.00
2011

Nuu-chah-nulthaht/WCVI Aquatic Management Society

The Future is Born from the Seeds of the Past

West Coast Aquatic Management Society proposes an intergenerational leadership project that brings together successful people who have a strong connection to the West Coast of Vancouver Island with young First Nations who show leadership capacity. The program will provide an opportunity for leaders to mentor youth in business, governance, management and science, thus building bridges between generations and building capacity in the region. One of the key opportunities that WCA has identified in its extensive consultations is building capacity of young leaders in the region by connecting them with leaders. Traditionally NTC youth were involved in mentorships (haa-huu-paa), but that system was broken by the residential schools. We believe that good leadership is key to making things happen. Part of leadership is passing on the wisdom from those who have been successful to those who will be successful. Mentorships that are created in response to specific community needs and the mutual interests of the mentor and apprentice will benefit everyone.
$45,000.00
2012

Okanagan Boys and Girls Club

Enderby Youth Outreach Worker

The small rural town of Enderby, located in the North Okanagan area of BC, has a population of 3,000 people. The Splatsin First Nation, with over 800 members, resides on reserve lands adjacent to the town. Youth in the community, regardless of ethnic background, have been underserved by social services and community groups for many years. As a result, these youth are particularly vulnerable to the risks and dangers of small town isolation—including drugs, alcohol, violence, poverty, joblessness, difficulty at school and with family relations. Youth in this community urgently need help to overcome these barriers and challenges and to acquire the skills that will lead to success in life—including positive family and community relations and secure, meaningful employment or connection to education. This project will establish a Youth Outreach Worker to bring the community together around common concerns for their youth by connecting with young people at-risk and developing long-term solutions to help them begin an uninterrupted journey to a healthy, secure and self-sufficient life.
$30,000.00
2013

Options Community Services

Neighbourhood Based Family Connections in Surrey/White Rock

Within the context of the dramatic demographic growth of Surrey (and the exponential growth in families with young children and the diversity of these families) and the limited neighbourhood infrastructure (geographic distance and transit issues that impose barriers) to support these families, the project will provide enhanced supports and resources to families through the creation of family resource networks or hubs.
$100,000.00
2011

Pacific Community Resources Society

Surrey Youth Collaborative Project

The City of Surrey has the largest population of youth in the Province and grows at a rate of approximately 1000 new people a month. Many of these new residents are youth who come from diverse backgrounds that place them at risk. At present there has been no one providing overarching leadership in bringing youth and youth providers together to plan for youth. This deficit has left youth served by overstretched services and one-off projects that often are unsustainable. The Surrey Child and Youth Committee, with the support of its member agencies including the City of Surrey, Surrey School District, and MCFD, is proposing to assume a role similar to the Surrey Children’s Partnership (ECD and Middle Years) by working with youth and their families, funders, agencies and the community to collaboratively establish a plan for Surrey youth. The project will establish a funders framework agreement, an MOU with funders and youth providers, data analysis, work with youth groups to identify their priorities, leading to a collective impact planning session and follow-up youth project
$52,500.00
2014

Pacific Post Partum Support Society

Expanding Postpartum Assistance to Underserved Populations across B.C.

The Project is divided into two parts. 1.The Multicultural Training Program will address higher risks for postpartum distress in immigrant women by (a) directing 2 8-hour training sessions per year for 2 years, resulting in a total of 60 staff and volunteers based out of multicultural agencies (in any B.C. community requesting training) who would then in turn administer assistance to at least 200 immigrant mothers and families, and (b) recruiting 15 multilingual telephone volunteers with varied cultural backgrounds over 2 years to meet the needs of non-English speaking women across B.C. over our toll-free line. 2. The Remote Access Cognitive Behavioural Techniques & Skills Program will monitor 20-30 mothers in remote areas who otherwise may be unable to access medical professionals and facilitated groups. We implement 8 prescribed weekly modules with each woman over our toll-free telephone line, fostering skills to assist women with their recovery from postpartum depression/anxiety.
$30,000.00
2012

Parent Support Services Society of B.C.

Grandparent Led Families Connecting For Change

We have worked with grandparents raising grandchildren (GRG) across the province for over 10 years . The need was identified by grandparents in our support groups, Grand Gatherings, legal seminars. and through our GRG email network. Our legal research 2007-2009 with U Vic School of Social Work confirmed the depth of poverty, inequity, barriers, discrimination, and health issues the GRG face. Our ongoing work in the province identified need and the growing number of GRG families. We will assist GRG to: learn about and protect their rights, develop problem prevention and solving skills, learn self-advocacy skills, learn about available resources and services; have a voice in improving provincial services and policies that have an impact on their families. There will be opportunities to connect with other grandparents, seniors, service providers, government representatives and the wider community. We will address issues of isolation and discrimination and connect grandparents with each other to become part of a larger network of similar families supported in community and by policy.
$35,000.00
2012

PeerNet BC

Building Inclusive Communities (BIC)

BIC brings youth together with older community members to develop and share facilitation and community engagement skills, culminating in inter-generational community projects. Each year, 14-16 registrants participate in 6 days of facilitation training focused on engagement practices and concepts. They participate in two five-week learning circles to mentor each other and explore ideas emerging from their training and conversations. PeerNetBC’s youth and community program staff facilitate, mentor and coach as the project evolves, supported by The Society for Children and Youth.
$70,000.00
2011

Penticton & District Community Resources Society

Community Hubs Expansion

PDCRS would like to expand the Hubs in the South Okanagan. These “one-stop shop” Hubs are for families struggling with literacy, emotional, physical or other barriers to promote increased awareness and accessibility to services that support healthy early childhood development for all families regardless of vulnerability. Rather than having to guess who to call or where to go, they can meet face to face with a facilitator to get information and help with accessing the right services. We will meet with families where they live and work to find the best times to connect and the best ways to ensure that families feel comfortable starting the conversation. The hub will also be available in the evenings for parenting programs. In 2008, the United Way of Canada commissioned an environmental scan of early childhood development initiatives and concluded that there is “widespread consensus in Canada that hub models are an optimum approach for the provision of ECD services.” And hubs located in schools are the “single most effective intervention geared to children, youth & their families.”
$90,000.00
2013

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