Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

UBC Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP)

Early Years Community Developers (EYCD) Institute

The overall aim of the Early Years Community Development (EYCD) Institute will be to build a better, more sustainable and community driven system for the early years in B.C. by creating mechanisms to strengthen the practice of EYCD professionals. The ultimate impact and evidence of a stronger early childhood system will be reflected in improved measures of child development outcomes and community capacity. This is the initial phase of the project. This phase is designed to build the capacity and competency of EYCD Professionals through: •Linking existing EYCD professionals in B.C. through a variety of opportunities for learning, resource sharing, practice-based research and peer mentorship. •Developing and then implementing a program of professional development to include on line as well as face to face sessions. This program will focus on identifying the core competencies of EYCD and establishing flexible approaches for content delivery. . Developing and maintaining a website to host EYCD professional development and networking opportunities.
$7,500.00
2011

Umoja Operation Compassion Society of BC

Reaching out to African Immigrant and Refugee Families and Youth

Umoja's Literacy and Life-Skills program that has been running successfully for three years. The program has been designed to address the specific needs of immigrants and refugees from war-torn countries. Our most recent survey indicates that 100% of the participants are satisfied with the program and have reported that the program has met their literacy and life skills needs and has helped them adapt to their new country. So far more than 100 immigrants have participated in the program. Our intention is to continue to offer this vital program and also extend it to the youth. The project has two components to it: (A) The Literacy: English reading, writing, conversation and numeracy. For the youth, we will add the homework assistance component. Participants will attend Literacy/homework program 3 times a week from 4:30-6:30pm. (B) Life Skills: Once a week 6-8pm the project will build Canadian life and leadership skills to integrate successfully into the society through workshops, speakers and out trips.
$70,000.00
2010

University of British Columbia

Communicating the Case for A New Deal for Families: Phase 2

This project builds on an existing partnership between the Vancouver Foundation, the UBC Human Early Learning Partnership, the United Way of the Lower Mainland and the YWCA of Metro Vancouver. The project aims to transform research into action to address many of the time, income, service and environmental challenges that confront Vancouver families with young children in all their diversity. Previous research shows that the standard of living for the generation raising young children has deteriorated significantly. The same research reveals that public policy has been slow to adapt. This is a bad deal for families. In the absence of policy adaption, over 30 per cent of local children start school vulnerable. Early vulnerability compromises childhood, and has adverse consequences for children’s future school achievement, health, risk of incarceration, and employment success. There is now compelling research to move from a bad deal to a New Deal for Families, including local, national and global evidence about the required policy changes. (see full document for details).
$75,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia Department of Pediatrics

Youth ON TRAC: A Health Advocacy Voice for youth with chronic health conditions

Youth aging out of pediatric care report feeling abandoned and helpless in the adult health care system. ON TRAC, a collaborative initiative involving UBC, Child Health BC, BCMA, BC Children’s Hospital and health regions, aims to improve health transition for B.C. youth. Key to success is genuine community-based youth engagement and an active and empowered youth voice. Healthy outcomes for youth will be actualized when youth are involved, active participants in their health care. Youth ON TRAC will directly engage youth with chronic health conditions/disabilities (CHC/Ds) in all processes to create a new, relevant, meaningful, effective, authentic youth health advocacy voice through skills-building training to 1)co-create a needs assessment; 2)develop a youth-led “transition workshop template” and hold workshops; 3)develop online social mentorship; 4)provide education for youth/families; 5)inform health care decision makers on youth-friendly health care transition. Creation of a Provincial Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) within Patient Voices Network (PVN) will ensure sustainability.
$50,000.00
2012

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

"Amlilas": Toward a 'Namgis Community-Driven Curriculum for Early Childhood Development'

This project addresses an identified priority of the 'Namgis First Nations people living in Alert Bay, British Columbia - to enhance the cultural relevance of early childhood education (ECE) so that children are entrenched in their language and cultural practices from their earliest days. Amlilas is the community's existing early childhood program. Through a community-based participatory process, we will build on the existing strengths of this program to support a more culturally relevant curriculum - creating a place where young 'Namgis children learn within their cultural traditions and language. Drawing on existing indicators of early childhood development and data generated in this project, we will propose curricular strategies reflecting unique dimensions of ECD within this community. The knowledge generated in this project will enhance the cultural relevance of ECD for 'Namgis First Nation children and contribute to knowledge informing ECD curricular planning and implementation within First Nations communities in British Columbia.
$40,000.00
2013

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Child & Youth Care in Action IV

The Child & Youth Care in Action conference takes place every two years at the University of Victoria. It is led by the School of Child and Youth Care within the faculty of Human & Social Development, however, partners with a number of disciplines including Education, Social Work, Women’s Studies and Indigenous Governance. The purpose of the conference is to bring together research, practice, theory, and policy as they relate to children, youth, families, and communities. The conference also has a strong focus and commitment to bringing those most affected by these issues, the actual children, youth and families themselves, to the conference as expert panelists, speaking to their own lived experience in order to help practitioners, researchers and policy-makers ‘connect the dots’ between theory/research and implications for communities. It is extremely expensive and costly for members of these remote communities to travel into larger cities like Vancouver and Victoria. The University of Victoria has waived all the registration fees for youth delegates and have secured funding from corporate sponsors to pay for staff accompanying these youth as well as lodging for the 3 days for mentors and youth. The funding from Vancouver Foundation will assist in supporting a small portion of each of the 10 youth’s travel. The Child & Youth Care in Action conference sets aside 50 of the 200 participant spots for youth from around British Columbia to participate as delegates but also in leading some of the concurrent workshops. Funding from Vancouver Foundation’s CYF committee will support 10 Aboriginal youth from extremely remote first nations communities (Carrier Sekani, Bella Bella, Nuu-chah-nulth, Chilcotin) to be able to travel to Victoria with mentors/staff who will support them in their conference presentations or as conference delegates. The approval of this small amount of funding will enable 10 young people’s meaningful participation in sharing their experiences, histories and work leading social change in their communities. This program grant is aligned with CYF’s priority to support youth engagement and leadership in remote communities around the province.
$1,470.00
2014

Indigenous Child Well-being Training Initiative

UVic has developed an Indigenous Child Well-being Research Network and has piloted training for Indigenous communities on child well-being best practices for the last 2 years. Each training session is developed in advance with community input. The training supports the Indigenous knowledge inherent in the community engaging Elders, adults and youth to learn about positive Indigenous child well-being best practices in order to inform public policy at all levels. They want to know how the current system works and how they can become more independent eg. through Granny Clubs, youth mentorship groups, etc., in order to protect and keep their children in their own communities. The training facilitates knowledge mobilization and the adaptation of promising practices to local contexts. Cultural metaphors such as basket weaving, dip nets or disappearing oolichan fish are used to provide an appropriate cultural context grounded in respect, relevance, reciprocity and responsibility.
$50,000.00
2012

Valley Community Services

Building for a Stronger Community

The project for which we are requesting support is to renovate a building which we have purchased. This project will create a “Family Resource Centre” for the Creston community. It will allow us to amalgamate rented office space which will reduce annual operating costs and increase overall organizational sustainability. It will also provide us with improved space in which to deliver programming and increase accessibility to our co-located programmes and services.
$20,000.00
2012

Vancity Community Foundation

Keeping BC's Children and Youth on the Public Agenda

Working closely with our coalition partner organizations, First Call will work to strengthen and support the collective voice for the rights and well-being of BC's children & youth.Some of the key issues the project will address are BC's continued high rates of child & family poverty & growing inequality, the urgent need to increase investments in early childhood & support for young families, improvements to BC's child labour standards, better supports for vulnerable youth and reducing children's exposures to environmental toxins. The project will identify issues/challenges and propose solutions using 3 strategies: public education(including conducting research and disseminating/popularizing others' research), mobilizing communities & individuals through workshops/presentations, media work, social media/web resources, election toolkits, e-alerts, etc., and direct public policy advocacy (briefs, letters, reports, candidate surveys, convening/facilitating discussions among advocates and with decision-makers & policy-influencers, e.g. public officials, business & community reps.).
$90,000.00
2014

Vancouver Aboriginal Child and Family Services Society

Culturally Relevant Urban Wellness (CRUW) Program

There are critical gaps in services for connecting Vancouver's most vulnerable youth to green space for wellness in holistic and dynamic ways. CRUW addresses these gaps by bringing together Aboriginal youth in foster care with new immigrant youth. CRUW promotes engagement with a deeply historical Aboriginal relationship to land, using the wellness youth derive from this connection as a catalyst for holistic and sustainable wellness in a diverse urban environment. CRUW is grounded in 4 program objectives: Honouring Our Diversity; Emotional and Cultural Competence; Holistic & Sustainable Urban Wellness; and Mentorship. The core UBC Farm program is the gateway to CRUW. Youth first join as participants, and have the opportunity to return a second year as paid youth mentors. Youth mentors and other alumni then have the opportunity to attend both the Cottonwood Community Garden program, and the Life Skills program. These 3 aspects of CRUW provide a multi-year trajectory of service to 100+ youth annually, empowering them as skilled and healthy agents of change within their communities.
$91,470.00
2014

Vancouver Child and Youth Advocacy Centre

Vancouver Child and Youth Advocacy Centre Pilot Project

This project is to complete a 3 year pilot project to establish a Child and Youth Advocacy Centre (CYAC) within the City of Vancouver. The specific vision for this centre is a co-located, multi-disciplinary, child centered approach to services for children who have experienced abuse and their non-offending family members and/or caregivers. In 2011, a group of mandated stakeholders came together and completed a two year comprehensive Needs Assessment and Feasibility Study to see if the need existed in Vancouver for a CYAC. The results of this first phase demonstrated both a need in Vancouver for a CYAC and that the stakeholders believed this project was feasible. Quantitative data demonstrated enough cases to warrant a CYAC. The qualitative data from this study was incredibly compelling, as it suggested that co-location of services for children/youth who experience abuse in Vancouver has the potential to reduce the barriers to joint interviews and reduce the travel time for children/youth and their non-offending family members. Any elimination of barriers could address possible under-reporting of child physical and sexual abuse. Following this, the stakeholders completed phase 2 - the development of a pilot project. After extensive research of CYAC models, the group believed that a not for profit was the appropriate model. This project (phase 3) will test and evaluate the establishment and operation of a CYAC in Vancouver.
$140,000.00
2015

Vancouver Society of Children's Centres

Moving Forward on Quality in Child Care

VSOCC and our 9 project advisory members wish to convene key child care sector, research, policy and funding representatives to address the gap in a quality assurance assessment/monitoring approach that supports the implementation of BC's Early Learning Framework (ELF)and effectively measures service quality in the child care context. This convening project will: *identify, recruit and support the participation of stakeholders in project forums and working groups *undertake a systematic and comprehensive review of assessment research literature and tools currently available in Canada and internationally that best align with ELF *examine international resources such as the OECD's Quality Tool Box and the European Commission's Quality Targets in Services for Young Children *create the research framework and a detailed proposal for developing and piloting a child care quality assurance approach based on ELF *determine the lead agency for the next phase of the work *seek financial support from community and government funders for the next phase
$20,000.00
2013

Victoria Single Parent Resource Centre Society

Moms and Mentors: Building Healthy Attachment

The project provides mentoring for at-risk, isolated pregnant and parenting teens and other vulnerable single mothers in Greater Victoria. The goal is to foster healthy pregnancies, and strengthen their parenting and coping skills. Moms are matched for a year with volunteer mentors, experienced mothers who understand the challenges of being single parents and can provide support in nurturing, resourceful and non-judgmental ways. Monthly group activities with on-site child care will provide educational and networking opportunities.
$40,000.00
2010

Victoria Women's Transition House

Stepping Stones for Families: Ready to Rent

The Stepping Stones Steering Committee of 11 agencies developed a program for families who cannot find, keep and/or maintain housing. Many of these families have poor housing references and are not accepted into even the most basic of housing units. This program offers a 12-hour course called Ready to Rent that prepares families to be good tenants and provides support for up to six months to the families. They are seeking funding to stabilize the program, which started a year and a half ago, and also to develop a business plan, do a cost-benefit analysis and create a strong governance model.
$70,000.00
2010

Village of Salmo

Renovation and Upgrades to Youth Centre

This project involves renovating the existing Youth Centre space and creating a new and expanded space for the youth. This will create a distinct and separate place for them to hold their Youth Leadership Program, Youth Drop In, Teen Fitness classes and run the Movie Cinema. Included in the project are the creation of a new commercial kitchen where Youth will have their weekly Supper Nights as well as host the concession for the 'Youth Run Movie Cinema'. The creation of this new kitchen will also allow the Youth Leadership to create goods to sell at Youth Program fundraising events.
$34,300.00
2013

Virsa - Sikh Alliance Against Youth Viol

Junior Leadership

Our Junior Leadership program promotes self-esteem, self-worth and enables youth to envision and actualize their own potential. This program is a new project based approach to reach these students as the previous after school homework help mentorship program we were running was no longer appealing to these students. As an elementary school-based program, each individual Junior Leadership program caters to the students' and schools' needs. This program is a project based program that will allow youth to tap into their leadership skills while taking ownership and a leadership role on multiple projects. These projects will then be a means for the students to fundraise towards a charity of their choice. This program is designed to allow youth to experience the fulfillment of community involvement as their projects will benefit community organizations and allow them to see how an individual can truly make a difference.
$8,000.00
2010

Watari Research Association

Eastside Integrated Youth Outreach Team

The Eastside Integrated Youth Team(EIYT) will provide outreach to youth in the Downtown Eastside six days weekly with the addition of two new members.The focus will be early intervention with youth under 19 who come into the community.The roles of these positions will include engagement, assessment, referral and follow-up with youth and the team of service providers/family that support them.Using the existing Hard Target Table as a point of entry, youth workers with EIYT will leverage their relationships with adult outreach teams, hotel staff and community members to identify new youth and intentionally engage with them to develop exit strategies.Existing connections with the youth serving system including MCFD, youth addictions, mental health, police and primary health care will allow youth workers to design and implement individualized case management response to each youth. The intention of these positions is to work effectively with a smaller number of youth as opposed to provide the broader outreach of general street outreach. One worker will have a psych nursing background.
$90,000.00
2013

Latin American Families: Kitchen Connections

Newcomer families arrive with hopes and wishes for a bright future in Canada. They are provided with information regarding the process of immigration but left to understand the process of integration on their own. The Latin American Families Kitchen Connections Project will focus on groups of 10 newcomer moms and their children under 6, providing a safe welcoming space weekly to enjoy a meal, meet peers experiencing similar struggles and recieve education from the Canadian systems that will most affect their ability to succeed in Canadian culture. This 12 week group will be co-faciliatated by community service professionals and a peer mom, providing a meal to gather around, childcare for the children and curriculum reflecting keeping families healthy and informed. Areas of focus include: stages of child development, the school system, sexual health/harm reduction, communication, stress management, child protection legislation.
$2,888.00
2011

West Coast LEAF Association

Mothering with Disabilities

This project will investigate legal and policy reform solutions to the challenges that disabled mothers encounter. We will collect qualitative data using feminist narrative inquiry (focus groups and semi-structured interviews with mothers with disabilities, and women with disabilities seeking to be mothers) and through interviews with key informants (service providers and advocates). We will also conduct legal research. Research questions include: 1. What are the legal issues facing mothers with disabilities? 2. What are the legal rights of mothers with disabilities and how do existing laws and policies impact these women’s rights as parents? 3. How should these laws and policies be reformed to ensure greater respect for the rights of mothers with disabilities? We anticipate addressing the following topics: reproductive rights; child protection; adoption law; family law; immigration law; social services; violence against mothers with disabilities; and employer responsibilities. Findings will be presented in a report to policy-makers, and will include law reform recommendations.
$43,000.00
2013

West Kootenay Women's Association Nelson & District Women's Centre

Gender Action Project (GAP) Theatre

The GAP project consists of 15 to 20 youth (ages 14 to 18) coming together once a week for four hours of workshop and training in Theatre of the Oppressed, a type of interactive theatre. This form of participatory education uses games, exercises, and discussions to inform youth about gender-based issues, including stereotypes, bullying, homophobia, transphobia, and relationship violence, and empowers them to respond positively when they encounter these issues in their lives. Youth and facilitators share a meal each week, and create a safe space for conversation and support. Through these workshops, the youth create interactive theatre scenes based on their collective life experiences. The youth will perform these plays in public forums, in order to facilitate dialogue and collective problem-solving in their communities. The audience is invited to intervene onstage and offer possible alternatives and solutions to the situations faced by the characters. Together, performers and audience explore different options for transforming violence and oppression in our communities.
$13,350.00
2014

Young Parents Support Network

Becoming Family: for Indigenous, non-Indigenous & newcomer young parents

In consultation with young parents we have developed a project which includes individualized coaching in life skills, parenting and goal-setting; group programs; and two Support Worker positions specializing in working with Indigenous and newcomer families. Partners include the City of Victoria and the Victoria Immigrant & Refugee Centre to provide a weekly group; and the Esquimalt Nation to provide programs to families living on local reserves. The target population for this project are Indigenous, non-Indigenous and newcomer young parent families who live with complex risk, including poverty, homelessness, abuse, neglect, fetal alcohol and narcotic effect, racism, low literacy, and sex trade involvement. This project will provide individualized support to young parents and their children through: i. a home-visitation program, ii. programs for families on local reserves; iii. an Indigenous Support Worker to ensure accessibility to our programs; iv. a Family Support Worker specializing in working with newcomer families, & v. a weekly fitness-wellness support group with childcare.
$50,000.00
2012

Young Women's Christian Association of Vancouver

Finding Solutions: Understanding Public Interest in Canadian Family Policy

Finding Solutions: Understanding Public Interest in Canadian Family Policy
$95,000.00
2010

YouthCO HIV & HEP C Society

Rural Aboriginal Youth CORE Training Project

This project will expand their current Aboriginal Youth Program (AYP) by adding two three-day peer education CORE training sessions per year, one in Vancouver and one in Prince George. Up to 12 rural Aboriginal youth will participate per session. Priority will be given to participants who are infected with, affected by, or at risk of and/or vulnerable to HIV, Hepatitis C and other infections.
$35,000.00
2011

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