Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

3H Craftworks Society

Threadworks: Tailored for Inclusion

Threadworks will be a flexible and tailored skills training program for people with disabilities who are not currently engaged in the workforce, not well served by current programs, and impacted by the lack of employment opportunities. The need for Threadworks arose from the number of people seeking sewing skills and the number of contracts received from Craftworks and Common Thread. Threadworks will be an accredited training program that will promote labour market participation in the cut-and-sew and apparel industries. The project will tailor curricula to address the complex needs of participants and to facilitate employment opportunities through social enterprise and for-profit industry collaboration. Flexible practicum-style opportunities will be incorporated to transition participants into paid employment. There are currently no accredited programs of this nature in Canada. The social goal of Threadworks is to dismantle the stigma that people with disabilities are unproductive and unreliable in the workforce. Mental illness is an evolving process and Threadworks will be open to fluctuations in participants’ health that affects their ability to proceed with training and employment. The project will lead to a cultural reinterpretation of what it means to have a disability in the labour market/workforce. Threadworks will adopt a holistic support model that includes industry partners, healthcare providers, community/social enterprises, and employment services.
$225,000.00
2015

Sewing and Socializing: Skills Development for Sustainability (hereafter SDS)

Driven by market changes, Craftworks has recently evolved from a business model reliant on retail sales to a more sustainable contract services business model. In order for the new model to supplement our program, SDS was developed to address an identified need for broader skills development, increased earnings, and socialization. SDS will expand participants' capacity through skills workshops (e.g. industrial sewing, embroidery, beading) that are tailored to our participants' learning styles and skill level. Acquiring these new skills will allow participants to access additional in-house earnings opportunities, otherwise not afforded to them. SDS will also provide more frequent opportunities for socialization through a regular schedule of monthly workshops that are conducive to peer learning. SDS will increase Craftworks' capacity by improving our knowledge of training facilitation and add competitive skills that will enable us to market ourselves as a full-service provider.
$35,000.00
2014

Craftworks Society Long Term Sustainability Project

The Craftworks Society Long Term Sustainability Project aims to help make our organization sustainable and ensure growth and success well into the future. We will accomplish this by: - partnering wtih more community organizations and strengthening our relationships with those we currently have to encourage sharing of resources and referrals between us - increasing and building on skills of the participants to foster personal growth, economic independence and possible employment within the community - building the 'brand' of Craftworks so we become better known in the community -- both to reach out to more participants and encourage sales and support for Craftworks - increasing the number of participants by 15% annually to serve a larger population in the community - developing and creating a signature line of products which will allow for a large number of participants to use a variety of skills in creating the products, and will increase store sales
$12,000.00
2011

Abbotsford Community Services

The Bridge Canine Care Program

The idea for this project originated with Diane Benaroch wanting to open a doggie day care and employ people with developmental disabilities to work at the doggie day care. Diane was concerned about the training of the individuals and how that would work. Diane met with the staff from the EPIC program with Abbotsford Community Services in May of 2014 where it was decided that a training program should be developed first and foremost. Through this project, we are hoping to build a bridge between people with developmental disabilities, dog trainers, and dog owners. The participants in this project will learn how to care for and train dogs and through the interactions they have with people involved in the canine industry will build relationships and connections that will provide them with jobs, friends and mentors.
$17,680.00
2014

Arion Therapeutic Riding Association

Arion Occupational Development

During our two years serving individuals and their families with Special Needs in the Kelowna community, we have noted a gap in pre-vocational services for young adults. We have had numerous differently-abled individuals come to the farm to volunteer, but often they lack the skills and appropriate behaviours to work independently and follow through on assigned tasks. These are essential skills required for sustainable employment. These young adults need a structured program with individualized behaviour intervention to become successful candidates for work placement in our community. Our project, the Arion Occupational Development project, will focus on helping the young adult and youth living with disabilities who do not have access to funding to gain valuable employability skills, thereby increasing their employment opportunities. Our objective is to teach employability skills, appropriate workplace ethics and accepted employment behaviors to young adults with global developmental delay through work experience on the farm. Our goal is to successfully place each participant in an employment opportunity recognizing their individual needs and challenges.
$50,000.00
2011

BC Centre for Employment Excellence

Top 20 Disability-Confident Companies in Vancouver

Currently, many lists exist outlining the “top 20 diverse companies” or the “top 10 companies to work for”, but the BC Centre for Employment Excellence (BC CFEE) aims to put together a top 20 disability-confident list of employers in British Columbia (BC). This list will be developed to identify companies that are welcoming and inclusive to individuals with disabilities within their workplaces. As well, the disability-confident list of employers will be shared with service providers in the employment services sector in BC or recruiters who work with people with disabilities, which will help increase access to the labour market.
$10,000.00
2015

The Face-to-Face Project: Bringing Youth with Disabilities and Employers Together

The Face-to-Face Project was born out of the need to find creative solutions that improve labour market integration for youth with disabilities. These are individuals who have a great deal to offer as employees but too often struggle in marketing their abilities to employers using traditional methods. For The Face-to-Face Project, youth (age 18 to 25) with disabilities will be recruited from employment organizations in BC to participate in a fun and engaging employer networking opportunity. The youth will initially be referred to local employers who will engage them in mock interviews and networking scenarios. In addition to providing the youth with information about their businesses, employers will have the opportunity to speak with them about their career aspirations. The employers will then refer the youth to a second employer, who will meet with the youth in an informational interview. The project will wrap up with a half-day dialogue forum for project participants and an evaluation that captures implementation lessons and effective practices.
$35,000.00
2013

Beaufort Association for Mentally Handicapped

Pet Treat Bakery Expansion Project

Pet Treat Bakery, a social enterprise business operated by Beaufort Association, has experienced tremendous success in marketting and selling our products on Vancouver Island, and in providing employment for people with developmental disability, In four years, our annual sales have grown from $55000 to $125000 and we are projecting similar increases over the next three years. Our workforce has grown from four to eleven hourly employees at our dehydration facility, working from 2 to 22 hours per week, and paid minimum wage and better. In addition we have a flexible work crew of four to eight piece-work employees to do packaging and labelling. We are ready to take the next step, hiring a manager and increasing production capacity. This will require renovation to upgrade electrical service, improvements to water supply and plumbing, purchase of additional equipment and other upgrades. We estimate a 50% increase in production will create between 24 and 28 addtional hours of work per week. This will mean an increase in hours for some employees and the hiring of additional staff.
$7,965.00
2014

British Columbia Self Advocacy Foundation

Breaking Down Barriers

ESATTA was contracted by the BC Self Advocacy Foundation(BCSAF) in 2011/12 to present their No More Barriers campaign to communities throughout BC to share their campaign video & website and host World Cafe style dialogues to find out the types of barriers experienced by self advocates in BC. All feedback was reviewed by self advocates and 5 common barriers were selected by self advocates to become the guidelines for their 2012 No More Barriers grants. The key barriers were: supported decision making(SDM), youth & self advocacy, health, housing and employment. ESATTA decided they would develop a workshop on: SDM, Health and Employment. We have made contact with School districts and agencies throughout BC and will be offering to present this workshop. We want to help community become more aware of youth & adults with disabilities and how they are an untapped workforce ready willing & able to be employed. We also want to talk to self advocates about ways to understand how to get help and support when making decisions and ways to keep healthy & be active members of the BC workforce.
$5,200.00
2013

Community Action Employment Plan - Self Advocacy Project

One of the objectives of the Community Action Employment Plan is that self advocates play a leadership role in changing public attitudes by: 1) Leading and delivering a presentation of why employment is important to them to a range of stakeholders, including government, unions, businesses, employers and families 2) Establishing a pool of self advocates in each region to act as consultants/resources to the Plan and related work. Provincial self advocate leaders convened in May 2013 to discuss options for collaborating with partners in the Community Action Employment Plan. They also discussed how self advocates could advance an employment agenda in BC. This proposal is a result of that meeting. The project is roughly divided into two phases. The first is to develop a presentation and toolbox to assist self advocates in promoting employment. The second phase is to begin building community partnership to support the planning of the local events in the three pilot regions and a workshop at the Inclusion BC Conference.
$68,000.00
2013

Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion

Kudos Prototyping Project

The Kudos Prototype Project will test and spread an informal learning & badging platform. Persons with a developmental disability will be matched to a pipeline of surprising learning experiences in the community, and receive credentials for their acquired know-how by means of a badging system (not unlike what is used in virtual games and social media). Experiences will be pulled together within multiple content streams around a passion (e.g hip-hop), a skill (e.g fixing things), a craft (e.g mechanics) or a discipline (e.g urban studies) - and provided by employers and community organizations via short taster sessions and mini projects. The platform will be co-created with persons with disabilities, their families, and local business owners. The idea for Kudos comes from 3-months of ethnographic work in a social housing complex in Burnaby. Whilst supported persons had access to day programmes and employment services, few activities widened and deepened interests, built bridging social networks, or leveraged those connections to shape meaningful, ongoing roles.
$110,000.00
2014

Campbell River & District Association

Scan Now

ScanNow will be offering a document scanning services. Where business can drop off documents to be scanned into electronic format, assured of confidentiality of all documents. The entire process is the customer drops of documents to be scanned into digital format(Computer Files). When the documents are scanned, the client would pick up the original documents and a DVD or USB with the scanned document files. Files would be made content searchable, organized in folders with matching equivalent paper folder directory names and file names. We are also able to offer an add-on service for Skyline Productions Shredding service, offering the client to scan documents to digital format before shredding. Skyline Productions has a large pool of established business clients which ScanNow could provide an attractive add on service.
$9,975.00
2014

Canadian Mental Health Association - Kelowna & District Branch

Meals Matter

Meals Matter - to provide low income individuals with the means to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Also supports low-intensity part-time staffing positions to people living with mental illness.
$90,000.00
2010

Canadian Mental Health Association - Port Alberni Branch

Healthy Harvest

Healthy Harvest Market Garden began four years ago with the idea of providing gardening skills and healthy food in a therapeutic environment for people with mental health issues. People were provided with a small honorarium for 10 hours of work per month. Since that time we have been able to get a long term lease on acreage and a greenhouse owned by the Hupacasath First Nations. The local food movement has been growing throughout BC and great opportunities exist in Port Alberni of which this project can take advantage. There is a great demand for local produce from restaurants in the Tofino-Ucluelet area and Port Alberni is the closest farming community. The Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District has a 20 year Agricultural Plan to achieve 40% food self-sufficiency. The ARCD recently hired an Agricultural Support Worker. There are two Farmer's Markets in operation in Port Alberni. We have experimented with different crops and methods of sales and are now ready to move into full production with the idea of becoming a self-sustaining social enterprise.
$33,000.00
2014

Canadian Mental Health Association - Prince George Branch

Expanding Employment - Year 2 and 3

The Expanding Employment project provides increased paid work experience and on the job site training to individuals who live with mental illness and substance use issues. Employees will have the opportunity to be trained by a professional chef in a catering business or work alongside an established crew on trail/yard maintenance, snow removal, gutter cleaning and small home repair jobs. These employment opportunities are in response to clients' requests to have "real jobs" and provide supportive work experience to assist in transitioning to community based employment. All prospective employees are matched with a support worker who will provide one on one vocational assistance and all will work on a team with a supportive trainer/leader who is in recovery. CMHA expects that some individuals will graduate to part or full time community based employment and all will benefit from increased independence and financial security which would lead to greater health outcomes.
$150,000.00
2012

Expanding Employment

The Expanding Employment project provides increased paid work experience and on the job site training to individuals who live with mental illness and substance use issues. Employees will have the opportunity to be trained by a professional chef in a catering business or work alongside an established crew on trail/yard maintenance, snow removal, gutter cleaning and small home repair jobs. These employment opportunities are in response to clients' requests to have "real jobs" and provide supportive work experience to assist in transitioning to community based employment. All prospective employees are matched with a support worker who will provide one on one vocational assistance and all will work on a team with a supportive trainer/leader who is in recovery. CMHA expects that some individuals will graduate to part or full time community based employment and all will benefit from increased independence and financial security which would lead to greater health outcomes.
$137,612.00
2011

Canadian Mental Health Association - Vancouver-Fraser Branch

Social Enterprise Services

Social Enterprise Services
$32,000.00
2011

Green Dry Cleaning Social Enterprise for Mental Health Consumers

Green Dry Cleaning Social Enterprise for Mental Health Consumers
$30,000.00
2010

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss

There is a lack of skills training and support for Canadians who are blind or partially sighted and the result is that 65 percent of working age adults with vision loss are unemployed and 50 percent earn less than $20,000 per year. CNIB's innovative Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss will support young adults at this critical stage in their lives and prepare them with the skills and confidence they need to earn a living and maintain a job. Through interaction with others experiencing the same struggles and situations this pilot project will building acceptance of vision loss through the discovery of adaptive methods, accessibility options, independent living skills and practical skills such as interview techniques and resume writing. These groups will empower young adults with vision loss by arming them with essential tools and skills. Together, participants will explore and discuss topics related to education, transitioning into the working world, assistive technology to achieve independence, social interaction, family life and more.
$90,000.00
2014

Canadian Society for Social Development

Internet Business Development for Entrepreneurs (IBDE)

IBDE is an online, accredited training program that helps persons with disabilities (PWD) become web designers or establish a business website. Curriculum is accessed from www.ibde.ca, allowing participants to learn comfortably from home. Participants receive one-on-one assistance from qualified, caring personnel who understand the challenges they face. Assistance is offered in our virtual classroom and through instant messaging, email, and telephone. We offer two IBDE programs: (1) IBDE Web Essentials, a six-month introductory web design program, and (2) IBDE Web Advanced, a four-month program offering training in web programming and web marketing. Through this project we plan to provide supports to 17 individuals in total, eleven in IBDE Web Advanced and six in IBDE Web Essentials. This project will increase employment for PWD by equipping them with technical skills and experience that are in high demand by employers and the business community.
$40,000.00
2011

CanAssist, University of Victoria

Expansion and Diversification of the TeenWork Employment Program

TeenWork is a unique social innovation. No other employment program in BC supports young people with disabilities while they are still in high school. The program was developed in 2009, when community partners identified the need for an employment service aimed at youth with disabilities. These youth were isolated and not acquiring important life skills associated with working. TeenWork helps level the playing field so youth with disabilities are able to reap the benefits of employment like their non-disabled peers. Job coaches provide individualized support to improve opportunities for employment among youth facing barriers and to continue this support during the transition to adulthood. TeenWork graduates eligible for government disability assistance tend not to access it because they have jobs that pay well and good benefits. Participants are optimistic about the future and their ability to be self-sufficient and contribute to their families and communities. Yet TeenWork only reaches 10% of youth in Greater Victoria who could benefit. Funding requested from the Vancouver Foundation would help expand the program in three critical ways: 1) improve program efficiencies and implement new fee-for-service opportunities to ensure ongoing sustainability; 2) diversify the participant population to include youth facing a wider range of barriers; and 3) work toward serving youth across BC by creating a training package that enables replication of the program in other regions.
$150,000.00
2015

Addendum to "Apps for Employment" (DSF12-0037)

CanAssist had initially proposed developing apps on the Apple platform in our 2012 request, targeting release on the Apple App Store at the conclusion of the project so that they are available to people with disabilities on a wider scale. This decision was made as support apps for the disability community traditionally have been overwhelmingly written for Apple devices. Through consultation with the Employment Apps Advisory Committee (clients, their job coaches and service providers), we have learned that device use among the target population accessing supported employment services is now more in line with the general population, with Android representing the majority of users. In fact, due to the lower cost of Android-based devices, these devices are now common for individuals with disabilities that may be living on a fixed or lower income. In order to maximize the accessibility of the apps created from this initiative, CanAssist would like to develop them on both Android and Apple platforms (and by extension, easing future versions for Blackberry or Windows Phone devices).
$50,000.00
2014

Apps for Employment

CanAssist proposes a two-year project, in partnership with community agencies, to create a suite of software tools that will help people with disabilities obtain and retain meaningful employment. In the first phase, CanAssist will tailor 2 of its existing software applications (apps) and develop 1 to 2 new apps and provide them to an initial group of clients. These clients, people with developmental disabilities, acquired cognitive challenges, ASD or FASD, will be identified by agency partners and, along with their job coaches, provide feedback to aid CanAssist in refining the apps. CanAssist will train job coaches and equip them to provide ongoing assistance to their clients. In the second phase, larger numbers of clients will use the apps in work-related activities. Surveys will be conducted to assess the apps’ effectiveness. Finally, the software and supporting materials will be made widely available online, providing a lasting legacy by establishing apps as a new best practice in employment-related support for those with disabilities.
$142,340.00
2012

Teen Work and Tech Work

The concept for TeenWork originated during discussions in 2008 among a group of partners, informally called the Greater Victoria Supported Teen Employment Consortium, the members of which provide a wide range of disability support services across Greater Victoria and the surrounding areas. CanAssist acted as the catalyst to bring this group together and continues to play the role of faciliatator and secretariat for all Consortium activities. The TeenWork program is a truly innovative pilot project designed to change the life path of young people with special needs by helping them find and retain part-time employment. A TeenWork staff member works with participating teens and their families, as well as local businesses, to prepare each youth for a part-time job and help them find work. A job coach then works with the teens as each develops new skills and becomes comfortable in his or her position.
$45,000.00
2011

TeenWork and TechWork

TeenWork and TechWork - To provide and promote meaningful and integrated employment and training opportunities, and/or related technological supports, for those with special needs.
$55,000.00
2010

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