Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

3H Craftworks Society

Craftworks Society Long Term Sustainability Project

The Craftworks Society Long Term Sustainability Project aims to help make our organization sustainable and ensure growth and success well into the future. We will accomplish this by: - partnering wtih more community organizations and strengthening our relationships with those we currently have to encourage sharing of resources and referrals between us - increasing and building on skills of the participants to foster personal growth, economic independence and possible employment within the community - building the 'brand' of Craftworks so we become better known in the community -- both to reach out to more participants and encourage sales and support for Craftworks - increasing the number of participants by 15% annually to serve a larger population in the community - developing and creating a signature line of products which will allow for a large number of participants to use a variety of skills in creating the products, and will increase store sales
$12,000.00
2011

Abbotsford Community Services

The Bridge Canine Care Program

The idea for this project originated with Diane Benaroch wanting to open a doggie day care and employ people with developmental disabilities to work at the doggie day care. Diane was concerned about the training of the individuals and how that would work. Diane met with the staff from the EPIC program with Abbotsford Community Services in May of 2014 where it was decided that a training program should be developed first and foremost. Through this project, we are hoping to build a bridge between people with developmental disabilities, dog trainers, and dog owners. The participants in this project will learn how to care for and train dogs and through the interactions they have with people involved in the canine industry will build relationships and connections that will provide them with jobs, friends and mentors.
$17,680.00
2014

BC Centre for Employment Excellence

Top 20 Disability-Confident Companies in Vancouver

Currently, many lists exist outlining the “top 20 diverse companies” or the “top 10 companies to work for”, but the BC Centre for Employment Excellence (BC CFEE) aims to put together a top 20 disability-confident list of employers in British Columbia (BC). This list will be developed to identify companies that are welcoming and inclusive to individuals with disabilities within their workplaces. As well, the disability-confident list of employers will be shared with service providers in the employment services sector in BC or recruiters who work with people with disabilities, which will help increase access to the labour market.
$10,000.00
2015

Canucks Autism Network Society

Golden Eagles Berries - Work Placement

This is CAN's pilot paid work placement program and part of the Aging with Autism series. Our intention is to support the aging autism demographic through volunteer placement, job readiness coaching and supervised work placement. This initial program will be one week long where participants will be supervised and assessed by a Site Coordinator and 1:1 Workers both in the plant and in the fields. We anticipate the assessments will indicate that 50% of the participants will move on to finding work opportunities outside of CAN. We intend to use this as a model for other programs adjusted according to the community needs and local resources throughout BC.
$14,100.00
2011

Connec Tra Society

Tetra Ability Opportunity TAO Project

The Tetra Ability Opportunities (TAO) project is an initiative of the ConnecTra Society, in partnership with the Tetra Society of North America, two charitable organizations that deliver support programs for people with significant physical disabilities. Tetra volunteer Brian Johnson suggested the idea that the new Tetra Workshop, created in partnership with iCord and located in the Blusson Spinal Cord Centre, could be adapted and opportunities explored, so that people with varying levels of disability (up to and including high quadriplegia) can be trained to use the workshop's tools and equipment. Together, Tetra and ConnecTra have developed a project that will assess the viability of training people with disabilities to learn to cut, drill, sand, paint, etc. Participants will learn these skills while working to create items that have been pre-selected as needing a range of tools, skills and levels of physical ability, including jigsaw puzzles, bird feeders, flower pot holders and wooden toys.
$20,000.00
2011

High Road Services Society

Innovations' Kitchen

Innovations' Kitchen is a social enterprise jointly managed by the Supported Employment Program and Special Projects program of HIGH ROAD Services Society. Innovations' Kitchen(IKitchen) operates five days a week in the cafeteria space of the local high school, providing nutritious snack and meal options prepared by the individuals employed part time by IKitchen. The individuals receive instruction and support in learning industry standard skills that can be transferable to other employment settings. Employers often do not have the time or resources to provide one on one continual training supports for individuals with disabilities. IKitchen removes this obstacle by providing on the job training in the areas desired by potential employers, while providing a fair wage for the individuals. Individuals are instructed in Food Safe and Health and Safety procedures while experiencing realistic employment expectations such as being on time for scheduled shifts, following an appropriate hygiene routine, working coherently with coworkers and completing tasks according to direction given.
$10,000.00
2014

Inclusion Langley Society

Youth Works

The initiative proposes to provide support to twenty secondary school students to secure part-time and after school employment. The supports will offer students in grades 10-12, including youth who are transitioning out of high school. The employment specialists, in collaboration with the school and family will engage in a discovery process in which students abilities will be observed in the students' work experience environment. This process will ascertain the students' abilities and potential employment choices to ensure a successful employment match. Once employment has been established, employment specialists will provide support to the employer and student with training, job coaching, continued support and monitoring to ensure the satisfaction of the employer and success of the employee. Securing part-time and after school employment is the most potent support we can offer students to ease the transition to adult life. Offering students the opportunity to have a robust resume & paid employment experience, provides them with a greater opportunity to obtain competitive employment.
$15,000.00
2014

Youth Works 2013

This initiative proposes to provide support to twenty secondary school students to increase their attachment to the labor market after school hours, weekends and throughout the summer months. These supports will be offered to youth in grades 10-12, including youth who are transitioning out of high school. The initiative proposes to complete a discovery process with each student, in collaboration with school and family partners, ascertain each individual's employment skills and interests and match them with a suitable employment opportunity. Individuals will be provided with the required on the job support and job coaching to ensure success in their workplace of choice. Securing part-time and after school employment is the most potent support we can offer students to ease and support the transition to adult life. This is the most common experience for typical youth, but remains a largely illusive opportunity for students with disabilities. Students graduating school with job experiences on their resumes will have a greater likelihood of securing employment after graduation.
$20,000.00
2013

Kelowna Community Food Bank

Pathways To Employment (PEP)

Launched in partnership with Service Canada in 2011, PEP is an employment skills building program assisting disabled persons who have little labour force attachment, develop the skills necessary to obtain and maintain employment. PEP builds personal capacity and reduces barriers through a structured, results oriented program offering real job skills development, practical experience, feedback and job search/employment supports. Two positions have been created: •Delivery Driver’s Helper (8 week program) •Community Kitchen Coordinator (16 week program) Participants are referred by partner agencies. They are co-supervised by our Op. Manager and agency coaches. Participant baseline (food bank usage, income, experience and skill inventory) is established, attendance and competencies are tracked and performance is reviewed. Successful participants gain valuable skills and leave the program job ready with an updated resume and referral letters. PEP is an ongoing, individualized job placement program. 3 program intakes are scheduled, with a max. of 2 participants enrolled per intake.
$10,900.00
2012

Kickstart Disability Arts and Culture

The Fine Line Project

The Fine Line Project is a series of cutting edge art events in the burgeoning field of disability arts. The theme for this series is a Fine Line, referring to the hazy boundaries in disability art, the line between therapy and art that heals; the line between individual production and art with assistance; the line between acoustic musicianship and technologically assisted music. Kickstart wants to take this opportunity to examine the particular boundaries disabled artists face. Through partnership with the Art House in the Field Collective and Vancouver Adapted Music Society, we are able to present readings, music, talks and workshops in an intimate accessible venue (Slocan Hall) that is a thriving neighbourhood centre for the arts. This project emerges from our multidisciplinary festival experience, and represents a change in delivery of programming, increasing our year-round visibility while maintaining our goal to present authentic non-sentimental expressions of the disability experience.
$13,000.00
2014

Learning Disabilities Association of British Columbia - Vancouver Chapter

Learning Employment and Education Program

The Leadership Employment and Education Program (LEEP) is a leadership and employment training program for youth (14-17) with Learning Disabilities. The program's goal is twofold: 1) to broaden each young person's understanding of their individual Learning Disability diagnosis and to enhance their skills as advocates of their needs in the workplace, 2) to provide each youth with employment training, and volunteer work placements that will prepare them for the workplace. Youth with Learning Disabilities face very specific challenges. The program is designed to help them explore these issues with others who experience the same battles, to build a sense of community with others, and to deepen their understanding and appreciation for their uniqueness. Youth will graduate from the LEEP program with a new sense of awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, newfound confidence in their abilities and unique talents, and a better ability to communicate their needs.
$10,000.00
2014

North Shore Disability Resource Centre Association (NSDRC)

InclusionWorks North Shore

Using the award-winning InclusionWorks model from Victoria BC as an example of how to support youth exiting secondary school and in their first five years of their transition into adulthood, a group of 8 families from North and West Vancouver would like to work with community partners such as Capilano Continuing Education, the District of West Vancouver and the North Vancouver Recreation Commission, and other agencies, on a pilot project. The project involves collaborating to provide age-appropriate community-based programming that focuses on educational, recreational, social and volunteer opportunities for young adults with developmental disabilities. This pilot project involves developing a model where families pool their financial resources and in working with community partners, design and coordinate weekly activities for their young people that help them maintain the active and stimulating lifestyle that they led while in the public school system. Using the InclusionWorks (IW) model, families who have opted for Individualized Funding from Community Living BC (CLBC) pool their funds and work with a group of community-based partners to create programming with the goal of building experience, independence, inclusion, and life-long learning for young people with developmental disabilities in their first five years after graduating from the public school system.
$10,000.00
2015

Powell River Brain Injury Society

Work for LIfe

K-Lumet is the product that will be produced through the Work for Life program. It is a unique program that will employ persons with disabilities and create new innovative partnerships in our community. It will afford persons in Powell River who are living with an acquired brain injury to gain skills and work in an environment which allows them to work at their own pace and capacity. K-Lumet is a product that uses waste wood and recycled products to produce a fire starter which we expect will soon become a household name in British Columbia, starting with Powell River. Our innovative idea is to train mangers in the production method of this product, which is an assembly line. We will then assess each of our brain injury population clients, of which we have over 200, to see where best their skill set is to fit in to the production line. We will train them in safety and first aid and will pay them hourly with a livable wage. Each brain injury is unique and each worker will be supported as they learn new skills and increase their self worth though becoming productive members of a collective that is all working together toward the same goal. That goal is for them to have a wage, usually which will supplement a disability pension, and to help create self-sufficiency of the Society that that supports them. It is a reciprocal win win for all involved. It is expected that this program will eventually create partnerships with other disability service providers in our area.
$10,000.00
2015

Realwheels Society

Breaking Barriers in Business Through Inspirational Speaking

In 2010-11, Realwheels founding artistic director and award-winning producer James Sanders successfully inspired audiences of small-business employers to the benefits of hiring people with disabilities. Over the course of 12 months, we will polish the presentation structure and associated materials, solidify partnerships, identify new audiences, and build a marketing plan for the continuation of the project as a social enterprise, thus providing an alternative revenue stream to Realwheels. Combining entertainment and advocacy, our multimedia presentations spark the interests of employers in exploring how their organizations may become more inclusive of people with disabilities. Partnerships with disability resource organizations ensure that employers’ inspiration can be effectively translated into action. Our objective is more employment opportunities for people with disabilities, and broader understanding of the benefits of hiring employees with disabilities across the corporate, small business and non-profit sectors.
$15,000.00
2011

Motivational Speaking

Motivational Speaking
$10,000.00
2010

School District #36 - Surrey

Warehousing Employment Project

Warehousing Employment Project
$20,000.00
2010

Steps Forward - Inclusive Post-Secondary Education Society

Farm Cycles: Employment and Sustainable Farming Communities

In this pilot project, STEPS Forward will work in collaboration local urban farmers to take community inclusion to the next step. In response to students' request to be more involved in the vibrant farming community in the Okanagan, this project will support this community to increase its capacity to include young adults with diverse challenges in valued roles and paid employment. The local food movement has the potential to be a space where people with different abilities can work together to become financially sustainable, meet like minded friends, and lead more ecologically sustainable life styles. The Farm Cycles Project will focus on supporting alumni and current UBCO students with developmental disabilities by seeking ongoing employment opportunities in food production, marketing and agriculture. They will have the opportunity learn about the organizations and resources for sustainable food-related issues in the Central Okanagan and how to work together towards common goals.
$15,000.00
2013

The Garth Homer Society

Supported Self-Employment Pilot Project

The purpose of this pilot is to develop and validate a practical working approach to supported self-employment (SSE) for people with developmental disabilities (DD), one of the most vulnerable and excluded of populations. Increasingly, SSE is being viewed within the community living sector as a viable employment option. However, there are few models for the delivery of SSE for people with DD, and for a variety of reasons existing models of self-employment for the 'difficult-to-employ' without disabilities do not work well for this population. In this project we will work with six developmentally disabled individuals to build self-employment businesses with the aims of (i) having the businesses generate cashflow within the project term, (ii) achieving specific employment-related learning and personal growth outcomes for each individual, and (iii) establishing the validity and practicality of our SSE service model.
$10,000.00
2014

The Progressive Housing Society

SafeCity Micro Cleaning

SafeCity Micro Cleaning is a social enterprise project to employ Burnaby's homeless and near-homeless people in a supported environment. We propose a collaboration of two social service agencies in Burnaby--Progressive Housing Society and Burnaby Community Connections--with the support of Burnaby's business community. SafeCity will offer street, lane and parking-lot cleaning contracts to business improvement associations in Burnaby. There is a prospect of expansion to include the painting of waste containers in strata complexes which have been sprayed with graffiti. This project is a six-month pilot project with a goal to continue on a self-sustained basis. SafeCity will be a low threshold opportunity for people whose addictions and/or physical and mentall illness have kept them from the mainstream workforce for lengthy periods. This suported employment project will reintroduce these individuals to gainful employment while they are assisted with the issues that have marginalized them in the past. Over time, engaging in this project may be a stepping stone to real employment.
$17,000.00
2012

Thompson Rivers University Foundation

Retail Kiosk Project

The ESTR Retail Kiosk Project is a new and innovative initiative for our Retail Certificate Program. The purpose of this initiative is to provide hands-on, retail training for our students which will empower and better prepare them for employment. Students in the program are required to complete 6 hours of Retail Labs each week over the course of two semesters. Currently students are working on and off campus to complete their lab hours. The kiosk would provide students the opportunity to connect classroom theory to real employment training and practice such as: - operating a small business and entrepreneuship - ordering and monitoring inventory - pricing and marketing product - stocking, displaying and packaging product - completing sales transactions and daily reconciliations - practicing customer service and sales This project also extends beyonds our program. Along with being interdisciplinary, aligns well with TRU's Strategic Priorities to increase: Student Success, Entrepreneurial Capacity, Intercultural Understanding, and Sustainability.
$10,000.00
2014

Together Against Poverty Society (TAPS)

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project - Year 2

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project - Year 2
$20,000.00
2011

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project
$20,000.00
2010

Vancouver Adapted Music Society

The Strong Sessions Music Series

Following up on VAMS recent, highly successful The Strong Sessions recording project, wherein over 20 VAMS members wrote, recorded and performed some amazing music, the project will work with music venues to establish a series of concerts featuring VAMS members. The intention is to feature VAMS members at clubs, bars and other public venues, exposing a broader sector of the concert-going public to the talents of musicians with disabilities. The project will offer opportunities for experienced VAMS performers to showcase their music, as well as enable those who are new to performing to do so in a supported environment, where their accessibility needs have been arranged for. Over the course of 12 months, ten "VAMS Nights" will be staged, offering audiences a chance to appreciate music written and performed by people with significant physical disabilities. At these gigs, VAMS will offer information about inclusion and accessibility, promote the recordings of VAMS members and engage other musicians interested in collaborating on future performances and recordings.
$15,000.00
2014

Victoria Brain Injury Society

Survivor, Supporter, Success!

At VBIS a Peer Supporter is available Monday-Thursday in our community room. This volunteer, who has experienced a brain injury themselves, is trained to support new members and facilitate group conversations. They pass on useful coping techniques, share their experiences with other survivors of brain injury and their families and refer survivors to useful community resources. We have found peer support to be an extremely useful way to help survivors deal with the devastating repercussions of brain injury. It is critical that we offer Peer Supporters appropriate training and support to maximize their effectiveness and the value they receive from their mentorship role. “Survivor, Supporter, Success!” is a Peer Support training program that educates and trains brain injury survivors on how to mentor and support their peers. This mutually beneficial program will enhance the capacity, skills and self-confidence of our Peer Supporters and can be utilized as a stepping stone to paid employment, while also providing recent survivors with mentors to support them with their recovery.
$10,000.00
2011