Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Burnaby Association for Community Inclusion

Kudos Prototyping Project

The Kudos Prototype Project will test and spread an informal learning & badging platform. Persons with a developmental disability will be matched to a pipeline of surprising learning experiences in the community, and receive credentials for their acquired know-how by means of a badging system (not unlike what is used in virtual games and social media). Experiences will be pulled together within multiple content streams around a passion (e.g hip-hop), a skill (e.g fixing things), a craft (e.g mechanics) or a discipline (e.g urban studies) - and provided by employers and community organizations via short taster sessions and mini projects. The platform will be co-created with persons with disabilities, their families, and local business owners. The idea for Kudos comes from 3-months of ethnographic work in a social housing complex in Burnaby. Whilst supported persons had access to day programmes and employment services, few activities widened and deepened interests, built bridging social networks, or leveraged those connections to shape meaningful, ongoing roles.
$110,000.00
2014

UBC - Office of Research Services

Improving employment outcomes for youth with mental illness in British Columbia

In BC, mental illness affects 1 in 4 young adults aged 15-24 years. At this stage, youth are typically completing school and/or skills training, and laying the foundation for a stable future. For youth with mental illness, challenges at school, home, and community are compounded by stigma and fragmented resources, resulting in low graduation rates, high unemployment, and poor health outcomes. Locally, the YMCA and Granville Youth Health Centre (GYHC) identified gaps in how youth with mental illness develop job skills and enter employment. They partnered to deliver an innovative program called Y-BEAT to provide employment support for this group. UBC has partnered with the YMCA and GYHC to test the effectiveness of Y-BEAT. The 16-week Y-BEAT program offers health, social, and employment skills education, including supported job placement. It differs from other employment programs because it enables youth to concurrently achieve their employment goals while successfully self-managing their illness. GYHC offers integrated health and social services. The YMCA’s employment programs served 139 youth last year, of which 31% identified mental illness as the primary barrier to obtaining work. Y-BEAT brings together these existing services and will be offered 4 to 5 times/year over the next 3 years. In collaboration with the Y, GYHC, and participating youth, our project will measure health, social, and employment outcomes of youth, summarize lessons, and disseminate findings broadly.
$105,720.00
2015

Victoria Disability Resource Centre

A GPS to Meaningful Employment for Persons with Disabilities

We want to create a continuum of sevices that will resutl in concrete systemic change and facilitate the employability of persons with disabilities. An individualized, non-prescriptive approach will encompass the entire process of reaching sustainable employment. This model will begin with a comprehensive person centred planning process that addresses barriers the individual encounters. Clients will be provided with a facilitated strategic planning process. Then the client will be matched with a mentor who will support them towards their employability goal. Secondarily, the VDRC has a history of facilitating disability awareness training with various stakeholders. However, this training has not been designed specifically with a focus on employment issues. We intend to modify this training to increase employers' awareness of and comfort level with addressing disability issues. Following the training, we will develop a workplace based mentorship program so that there is cross learning between the employer and person(s) with disabilities. Also, to follow on the work developed with employers by the Community Council's Quality of Life Challenge, we would develop a community based employer network interested in addressing systemic issues related to disability.
$100,000.00
2012

A GPS to Meaningful Employment Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities

We want to create a continuum of sevices that will resutl in concrete systemic change and facilitate the employability of persons with disabilities. An individualized, non-prescriptive approach will encompass the entire process of reaching sustainable employment. This model will begin with a comprehensive person centred planning process that addresses barriers the individual encounters. Clients will be provided with a facilitated strategic planning process. Then the client will be matched with a mentor who will support them towards their employability goal. Secondarily, the VDRC has a history of facilitating disability awareness training with various stakeholders. However, this training has not been designed specifically with a focus on employment issues. We intend to modify this training to increase employers' awareness of and comfort level with addressing disability issues. Following the training, we will develop a workplace based mentorship program so that there is cross learning between the employer and person(s) with disabilities. Also, to follow on the work developed with employers by the Community Council's Quality of Life Challenge, we would develop a community based employer network interested in addressing systemic issues related to disability.
$100,000.00
2011