Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Canadian Mental Health Association - Prince George Branch

Expanding Employment - Year 2 and 3

The Expanding Employment project provides increased paid work experience and on the job site training to individuals who live with mental illness and substance use issues. Employees will have the opportunity to be trained by a professional chef in a catering business or work alongside an established crew on trail/yard maintenance, snow removal, gutter cleaning and small home repair jobs. These employment opportunities are in response to clients' requests to have "real jobs" and provide supportive work experience to assist in transitioning to community based employment. All prospective employees are matched with a support worker who will provide one on one vocational assistance and all will work on a team with a supportive trainer/leader who is in recovery. CMHA expects that some individuals will graduate to part or full time community based employment and all will benefit from increased independence and financial security which would lead to greater health outcomes.
$150,000.00
2012

CanAssist, University of Victoria

Expansion and Diversification of the TeenWork Employment Program

TeenWork is a unique social innovation. No other employment program in BC supports young people with disabilities while they are still in high school. The program was developed in 2009, when community partners identified the need for an employment service aimed at youth with disabilities. These youth were isolated and not acquiring important life skills associated with working. TeenWork helps level the playing field so youth with disabilities are able to reap the benefits of employment like their non-disabled peers. Job coaches provide individualized support to improve opportunities for employment among youth facing barriers and to continue this support during the transition to adulthood. TeenWork graduates eligible for government disability assistance tend not to access it because they have jobs that pay well and good benefits. Participants are optimistic about the future and their ability to be self-sufficient and contribute to their families and communities. Yet TeenWork only reaches 10% of youth in Greater Victoria who could benefit. Funding requested from the Vancouver Foundation would help expand the program in three critical ways: 1) improve program efficiencies and implement new fee-for-service opportunities to ensure ongoing sustainability; 2) diversify the participant population to include youth facing a wider range of barriers; and 3) work toward serving youth across BC by creating a training package that enables replication of the program in other regions.
$150,000.00
2015