Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Canadian Mental Health Association - Kelowna & District Branch

Meals Matter

Meals Matter - to provide low income individuals with the means to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Also supports low-intensity part-time staffing positions to people living with mental illness.
$90,000.00
2010

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss

There is a lack of skills training and support for Canadians who are blind or partially sighted and the result is that 65 percent of working age adults with vision loss are unemployed and 50 percent earn less than $20,000 per year. CNIB's innovative Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss will support young adults at this critical stage in their lives and prepare them with the skills and confidence they need to earn a living and maintain a job. Through interaction with others experiencing the same struggles and situations this pilot project will building acceptance of vision loss through the discovery of adaptive methods, accessibility options, independent living skills and practical skills such as interview techniques and resume writing. These groups will empower young adults with vision loss by arming them with essential tools and skills. Together, participants will explore and discuss topics related to education, transitioning into the working world, assistive technology to achieve independence, social interaction, family life and more.
$90,000.00
2014

Coast Mental Health Foundation

Low Barrier Employment for People with Mental Illness

For the past 30 years, Coast Mental Health has operated supported employment programs for people with severe mental illness. We have observed the difficulty people with severe mental illness have in returning to work due to the symptoms of their illness, their medication and their lack of confidence. Coast has seen that opportunities to work need to have structured expectations but offer the client flexibility, time to practice good work skills and to become accustomed to working. In 2009,Coast had the opportunity to develop a new low barrier employment program, the” Street Cleaning Crew” with funding from the City of Vancouver. The project hires and trains people with mental illness in skills required to clean community sidewalks, gutters and alleys of refuse and debris. The workers are supported by Peer Support Workers and supervised on the job by project staff until they regain their independent work skills. Once they reach that point the clients are encourage to find other paid employment if that is appropriate for their health.
$90,000.00
2012

Kindale Developmental Association

Employment Readiness for Youth and Young Adults

Kindale's project will assist youth and young adults with developmental disabilities to gain the skills, habits, attitudes, and experiences necessary to become employed in real jobs in their local community. The program is individualized based on the development of a personal employment plan for each of the 20 participants, focused on their abilities, needs, and goals. It includes employment skills assessment, training, coaching, on-the-job support, and reinforcement of the learned skills and habits at home. The project also works with local businesses to provide job-specific training and employment opportunities for the participants. Program staff work with employers and their employees to allay fears, raise awareness, and foster relationship building. On-the-job support is provided as needed by the program participant, employer, or their employees. This direct linking of personal employment planning, employment readiness training, job specific skills coaching, and employer development makes this project different from, and closes gaps in, services for this population.
$90,000.00
2014

Kinsight Community Society

Youth Employment Initiative

Years 2 & 3 of a 3 year project with a long range goal to expand community capacity to successfully engage youth who have developmental disabilities in sustainable, paid employment. It is intended to increase employment opportunities and the overall rate of employment for youth aged 15 - 19 in the TriCities. With the initiative successfully underway with 10 students at Heritage Woods Secondary in Port Moody, it is our intent to expand the project to the communities of Coquitlam and Port Coquitlam in years 2 & 3. This will be accomplished through supports to bridge Secondary students from school work experience placements into paid part or full time employment and by expanding the pool of employment opportunities in the TriCities through the recruitment & education of potential employers. A cross-sectoral steering committee will continue to evaluate and guide progress, ongoing viability and strategies for project expansion and improved connections to the business community. The 2nd and 3rd years allow us to check back with previous schools/communities to ensure project sustainability.
$95,791.16
2014

Victoria Disability Resource Centre

A GPS to Meaningful Employment for Persons with Disabilities

We want to create a continuum of sevices that will resutl in concrete systemic change and facilitate the employability of persons with disabilities. An individualized, non-prescriptive approach will encompass the entire process of reaching sustainable employment. This model will begin with a comprehensive person centred planning process that addresses barriers the individual encounters. Clients will be provided with a facilitated strategic planning process. Then the client will be matched with a mentor who will support them towards their employability goal. Secondarily, the VDRC has a history of facilitating disability awareness training with various stakeholders. However, this training has not been designed specifically with a focus on employment issues. We intend to modify this training to increase employers' awareness of and comfort level with addressing disability issues. Following the training, we will develop a workplace based mentorship program so that there is cross learning between the employer and person(s) with disabilities. Also, to follow on the work developed with employers by the Community Council's Quality of Life Challenge, we would develop a community based employer network interested in addressing systemic issues related to disability.
$100,000.00
2012

A GPS to Meaningful Employment Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities

We want to create a continuum of sevices that will resutl in concrete systemic change and facilitate the employability of persons with disabilities. An individualized, non-prescriptive approach will encompass the entire process of reaching sustainable employment. This model will begin with a comprehensive person centred planning process that addresses barriers the individual encounters. Clients will be provided with a facilitated strategic planning process. Then the client will be matched with a mentor who will support them towards their employability goal. Secondarily, the VDRC has a history of facilitating disability awareness training with various stakeholders. However, this training has not been designed specifically with a focus on employment issues. We intend to modify this training to increase employers' awareness of and comfort level with addressing disability issues. Following the training, we will develop a workplace based mentorship program so that there is cross learning between the employer and person(s) with disabilities. Also, to follow on the work developed with employers by the Community Council's Quality of Life Challenge, we would develop a community based employer network interested in addressing systemic issues related to disability.
$100,000.00
2011