Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Steps Forward - Inclusive Post-Secondary Education Society

Farm Cycles: Employment and Sustainable Farming Communities

In this pilot project, STEPS Forward will work in collaboration local urban farmers to take community inclusion to the next step. In response to students' request to be more involved in the vibrant farming community in the Okanagan, this project will support this community to increase its capacity to include young adults with diverse challenges in valued roles and paid employment. The local food movement has the potential to be a space where people with different abilities can work together to become financially sustainable, meet like minded friends, and lead more ecologically sustainable life styles. The Farm Cycles Project will focus on supporting alumni and current UBCO students with developmental disabilities by seeking ongoing employment opportunities in food production, marketing and agriculture. They will have the opportunity learn about the organizations and resources for sustainable food-related issues in the Central Okanagan and how to work together towards common goals.
$15,000.00
2013

Sunshine Coast Association for Community Living

Garden to Table Food Hub

SCACL is embarking on a three year initiative to develop their commercial store front into a sustainable social enterprise that offers community inclusion and employment opportunities to persons with disabilities. The concept is to operate a "Garden to Table Food Hub". The store front would offer sales of local produce and value added food products, resources, training in food production and catering, sustainable gardening workshops, community kitchens and a shared commercial kitchen. The "Food Hub" would offer exciting sustainable employment opportunities in agriculture and food production and expand social and community inclusion opportunities to persons who are marginalized by traditional work hours and places. The idea for the project came from meeting other successful social enterprises such as SOLE Foods in Vancouver and the growing of our own food over the past two years. SCACL has been meeting for over a year with community groups about the concept of the "Food Hub" and has several partnerships and consultants in place to assist in the development and success of the project.
$60,000.00
2012

The Cridge Centre for the Family

Feeding the Future

Feeding the Future is a social enterprise developing as a natural (pun intended) extension of The Cridge Brain Injury Services' successful community garden and community cooking programs. What began in 2010 as a community cooking program that balanced education and application has grown in response to client feedback to include an on-property community garden. Clients who complete the community cooking program have continued to meet and share their resources and knowledge in community kitchens. Feeding the Future will use produce grown by Cridge Brain Injury Service clients, create value-added nutritional foods with the skills learned in the community cooking program, and sell the resulting goods weekly at neighbourhood farmers markets. Clients will be encouraged to explore their own areas of interest in the social enterprise, building meaningful employment skills in business planning and development, marketing, and customer service as well as the gardening and cooking they are already becoming expert in.
$51,418.00
2014

The Garth Homer Society

Supported Self-Employment Pilot Project

The purpose of this pilot is to develop and validate a practical working approach to supported self-employment (SSE) for people with developmental disabilities (DD), one of the most vulnerable and excluded of populations. Increasingly, SSE is being viewed within the community living sector as a viable employment option. However, there are few models for the delivery of SSE for people with DD, and for a variety of reasons existing models of self-employment for the 'difficult-to-employ' without disabilities do not work well for this population. In this project we will work with six developmentally disabled individuals to build self-employment businesses with the aims of (i) having the businesses generate cashflow within the project term, (ii) achieving specific employment-related learning and personal growth outcomes for each individual, and (iii) establishing the validity and practicality of our SSE service model.
$10,000.00
2014

Oak Bay High School Transition Pilot

The Oak Bay High School Transition Pilot Program is targeted to high school students with developmental disabilities, and their families, to support them in preparing and making effective choices concerning community inclusion, support programs, and employment after graduation. Working with students from grades 10 to 12, the program will create experiential learning opportunities that allow students to gain independent learning about the different possibilities open to them. The varied experiences provided — such as employment internships, post-secondary opportunities, volunteer participation, or other community inclusion activities — would allow students to make informed choices about their futures. It also allows the program facilitators to provide new perspective for individual students, their families, and others involved in their support, on each student’s potential to transition effectively after graduation, and to succeed and develop in different situations. Funding is being requested for Phase 3 of this project, from January to June 2013.
$25,000.00
2012

Employment First

The GHS works with over 150 clients, 60 in employment services, to create opportunities for independence, growth and participation/integration in the community for people who strive to overcome developmental disabilities. The sector's philosophical initiative toward full integration and clients' desire to work has brought to the forefront the need for more staff training as well as the preparation of marketing and information collateral for potential employers. We will be the first agency to do so in Greater Victoria and will be sharing our process and results with other agencies and care givers.
$5,500.00
2011

The Progressive Housing Society

SafeCity Micro Cleaning

SafeCity Micro Cleaning is a social enterprise project to employ Burnaby's homeless and near-homeless people in a supported environment. We propose a collaboration of two social service agencies in Burnaby--Progressive Housing Society and Burnaby Community Connections--with the support of Burnaby's business community. SafeCity will offer street, lane and parking-lot cleaning contracts to business improvement associations in Burnaby. There is a prospect of expansion to include the painting of waste containers in strata complexes which have been sprayed with graffiti. This project is a six-month pilot project with a goal to continue on a self-sustained basis. SafeCity will be a low threshold opportunity for people whose addictions and/or physical and mentall illness have kept them from the mainstream workforce for lengthy periods. This suported employment project will reintroduce these individuals to gainful employment while they are assisted with the issues that have marginalized them in the past. Over time, engaging in this project may be a stepping stone to real employment.
$17,000.00
2012

Thompson Rivers University Foundation

Retail Kiosk Project

The ESTR Retail Kiosk Project is a new and innovative initiative for our Retail Certificate Program. The purpose of this initiative is to provide hands-on, retail training for our students which will empower and better prepare them for employment. Students in the program are required to complete 6 hours of Retail Labs each week over the course of two semesters. Currently students are working on and off campus to complete their lab hours. The kiosk would provide students the opportunity to connect classroom theory to real employment training and practice such as: - operating a small business and entrepreneuship - ordering and monitoring inventory - pricing and marketing product - stocking, displaying and packaging product - completing sales transactions and daily reconciliations - practicing customer service and sales This project also extends beyonds our program. Along with being interdisciplinary, aligns well with TRU's Strategic Priorities to increase: Student Success, Entrepreneurial Capacity, Intercultural Understanding, and Sustainability.
$10,000.00
2014

Together Against Poverty Society (TAPS)

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project - Year 2

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project - Year 2
$20,000.00
2011

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project

Volunteer Disability Advocacy Project
$20,000.00
2010

TTS Theatre Terrific Society

I Love Mondays

I Love Mondays
$30,000.00
2011

Mrs. Miller's Diary

Mrs. Miller's Diary - a full scale professional production that will employ 9 diversely abled actors each paid at union scale, along with technically experienced theatre professional for a series of developmental workshops and a two week performance run in a professional Vancouver Theatre.
$30,000.00
2010

UBC - Office of Research Services

Improving employment outcomes for youth with mental illness in British Columbia

In BC, mental illness affects 1 in 4 young adults aged 15-24 years. At this stage, youth are typically completing school and/or skills training, and laying the foundation for a stable future. For youth with mental illness, challenges at school, home, and community are compounded by stigma and fragmented resources, resulting in low graduation rates, high unemployment, and poor health outcomes. Locally, the YMCA and Granville Youth Health Centre (GYHC) identified gaps in how youth with mental illness develop job skills and enter employment. They partnered to deliver an innovative program called Y-BEAT to provide employment support for this group. UBC has partnered with the YMCA and GYHC to test the effectiveness of Y-BEAT. The 16-week Y-BEAT program offers health, social, and employment skills education, including supported job placement. It differs from other employment programs because it enables youth to concurrently achieve their employment goals while successfully self-managing their illness. GYHC offers integrated health and social services. The YMCA’s employment programs served 139 youth last year, of which 31% identified mental illness as the primary barrier to obtaining work. Y-BEAT brings together these existing services and will be offered 4 to 5 times/year over the next 3 years. In collaboration with the Y, GYHC, and participating youth, our project will measure health, social, and employment outcomes of youth, summarize lessons, and disseminate findings broadly.
$105,720.00
2015

Vancouver Adapted Music Society

The Strong Sessions Music Series

Following up on VAMS recent, highly successful The Strong Sessions recording project, wherein over 20 VAMS members wrote, recorded and performed some amazing music, the project will work with music venues to establish a series of concerts featuring VAMS members. The intention is to feature VAMS members at clubs, bars and other public venues, exposing a broader sector of the concert-going public to the talents of musicians with disabilities. The project will offer opportunities for experienced VAMS performers to showcase their music, as well as enable those who are new to performing to do so in a supported environment, where their accessibility needs have been arranged for. Over the course of 12 months, ten "VAMS Nights" will be staged, offering audiences a chance to appreciate music written and performed by people with significant physical disabilities. At these gigs, VAMS will offer information about inclusion and accessibility, promote the recordings of VAMS members and engage other musicians interested in collaborating on future performances and recordings.
$15,000.00
2014

Victoria Brain Injury Society

Survivor, Supporter, Success!

The "Survivor, Supporter, Success!" program provides volunteer and employment training and mentorship to brain injury survivors. A large percentage of survivors are unable to return to their previous professions post-injury and must find gainful employment or volunteer opportunities in an environment that works with their disabilities. This program aims to rehabilitate and retrain survivors so they are able to volunteer or re-enter the workforce. Participants complete a peer support training course which enables them to become certified peer support volunteers. They develop transferable skills, including active learning and listening, problem solving, critical thinking, social perceptiveness, time management and communication skills. Once in their position as peer supporters, they support other survivors during their rehabilitation. This mutually beneficial program enhances the capacity and self-confidence of the peer supporters and is utilized as a stepping stone to paid employment, while also providing recent survivors with educated, understanding peer mentors.
$28,236.00
2013

Survivor, Supporter, Success!

The “Survivor, Supporter, Success!” program provides volunteer and employment training and mentorship to brain injury survivors. A large percentage of survivors are unable to return to their previous professions post-injury and must find gainful employment or volunteer opportunities in an environment that works with their disabilities. This program aims to rehabilitate and retrain survivors so they are able to volunteer or re-enter the workforce. Participants complete a peer support training course which enables them to become certified peer support volunteers. They develop transferable skills, including active learning and listening, problem solving, critical thinking, social perceptiveness, time management and communication skills. Once in their position as peer supporters, they support other survivors during their rehabilitation. This mutually beneficial program enhances the capacity and self-confidence of the peer supporters and is utilized as a stepping stone to paid employment, while providing recent survivors with educated, understanding peer mentors.
$26,505.00
2012

Survivor, Supporter, Success!

At VBIS a Peer Supporter is available Monday-Thursday in our community room. This volunteer, who has experienced a brain injury themselves, is trained to support new members and facilitate group conversations. They pass on useful coping techniques, share their experiences with other survivors of brain injury and their families and refer survivors to useful community resources. We have found peer support to be an extremely useful way to help survivors deal with the devastating repercussions of brain injury. It is critical that we offer Peer Supporters appropriate training and support to maximize their effectiveness and the value they receive from their mentorship role. “Survivor, Supporter, Success!” is a Peer Support training program that educates and trains brain injury survivors on how to mentor and support their peers. This mutually beneficial program will enhance the capacity, skills and self-confidence of our Peer Supporters and can be utilized as a stepping stone to paid employment, while also providing recent survivors with mentors to support them with their recovery.
$10,000.00
2011

Victoria Cool Aid Society

Community Casual Labour Pool

The "Community Casual Labour Pool" project matches individuals looking for short-term work placements with local employers, generating income and opportunity for people with disabilities.
$46,470.00
2012

Community Casual Labour Pool

The "Community Casual Labour Pool" project matches individuals looking for short-term work placements with local employers, generating income and opportunity for people with disabilities.
$44,640.00
2011

Community Casual Labour Pool

This project runs the Community Casual Labour Pool where individuals looking for short-term work are placed with local employers.
$43,000.00
2010

Victoria Disability Resource Centre

A GPS to Meaningful Employment for Persons with Disabilities

We want to create a continuum of sevices that will resutl in concrete systemic change and facilitate the employability of persons with disabilities. An individualized, non-prescriptive approach will encompass the entire process of reaching sustainable employment. This model will begin with a comprehensive person centred planning process that addresses barriers the individual encounters. Clients will be provided with a facilitated strategic planning process. Then the client will be matched with a mentor who will support them towards their employability goal. Secondarily, the VDRC has a history of facilitating disability awareness training with various stakeholders. However, this training has not been designed specifically with a focus on employment issues. We intend to modify this training to increase employers' awareness of and comfort level with addressing disability issues. Following the training, we will develop a workplace based mentorship program so that there is cross learning between the employer and person(s) with disabilities. Also, to follow on the work developed with employers by the Community Council's Quality of Life Challenge, we would develop a community based employer network interested in addressing systemic issues related to disability.
$100,000.00
2012

A GPS to Meaningful Employment Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities

We want to create a continuum of sevices that will resutl in concrete systemic change and facilitate the employability of persons with disabilities. An individualized, non-prescriptive approach will encompass the entire process of reaching sustainable employment. This model will begin with a comprehensive person centred planning process that addresses barriers the individual encounters. Clients will be provided with a facilitated strategic planning process. Then the client will be matched with a mentor who will support them towards their employability goal. Secondarily, the VDRC has a history of facilitating disability awareness training with various stakeholders. However, this training has not been designed specifically with a focus on employment issues. We intend to modify this training to increase employers' awareness of and comfort level with addressing disability issues. Following the training, we will develop a workplace based mentorship program so that there is cross learning between the employer and person(s) with disabilities. Also, to follow on the work developed with employers by the Community Council's Quality of Life Challenge, we would develop a community based employer network interested in addressing systemic issues related to disability.
$100,000.00
2011

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