Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

?aq'am

Youth Leadership Program

The program is aimed at promoting the health, well-being and resilience of Aboriginal children, youth, individuals and families. The programs goals are to: develop a sense of belonging, ownership and control in youth’s personal lives, their education and within their communities and families; Increase self esteem, self awareness, resiliency and sense of responsibility in order to function as mentally and emotionally well members of their communities and society in general. When youth are connected, they will be more likely to graduate. The aim is to build resilience and well-being of at-risk youth, and families through leadership training, mentorship, self esteem building, cultural connectedness, and educational workshops based on common social issues affecting youth today. The development process will include engaging stakeholders, students and their families in creating a program that fits well within the school system and can be sustained over time. This program must be youth directed to achieve buy in and be successful. Instruments of data collection will be created to gain input into what interests youth, how they would like to be involved and how educators and family can best support them. A training curriculum will be developed based on information collected and timelines for implementation of the program will be established. Near the end a core group of participants will be identified in order to carry the project to implementation.
$10,000.00
2016

Arts in Action Society

Oh the Places You Should Know: A Squamish Place Names Curriculum

The “Oh the Places You Should Know” curriculum project aims to create a foundation for the development of learning materials to accompany the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh Place Names map that are tailored to the needs of individual School Districts situated on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory (Vancouver, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Squamish, and Whistler). The project will include focus groups with teachers in order to understand their needs, collaboration with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh knowledge keepers to collect stories and information to be used in the materials, and the creation of sample materials to be piloted in select School Districts. These materials have the potential to change how those living on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory understand and interact with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples and places. By using these materials, students and teachers can begin to break down the cycle of racism that our education system has historically perpetuated. Awareness is the first step towards change. The materials will afford a deeper understanding of the culture and current issues of the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples, and a greater appreciation of the natural history of the places students and teachers visit every day. With support from Vancouver Foundation, we will be able to develop test materials to pilot in several schools, and gather the feedback required to create inspiring curriculum kits that will change how those on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory learn about Sk_wx_wu´7mesh histories and peoples.
$10,000.00
2016

Be the Change Earth Alliance Society

Greenest School Lab

The Lab is a proposal to convene a multi-stakeholder coalition that will guide participants in addressing the personal, social, and environmental conditions necessary for creating a model ecological culture in a school. By engaging the knowledge, shared values, and professional resources of stakeholders BTCEA will be informed and positioned to ensure that this initiative delivers: 1. An impact-driven coalition of stakeholders who will come together at various stages of collaboration to share their knowledge, experience, and concepts. 2. A deliberative and dynamic process developed around shared values that will effectively surface innovative ideas and prototypes for building a model school necessary for a sustainable future. 3. A knowledge-rich network of relationships that will sustain the process for surfacing innovative ideas for school-based initiatives to be prototyped and piloted in a school in the Vancouver and Surrey districts. To bring the greenest school into reality, BTCEA will identify the different users of a greenest school, determine what design interventions they can create together, and deliver a prototype that they can test together. Stakeholders will share ideas and insights, first individually and then collectively, on supporting systemic change as already advanced within provincial and municipal policy change to develop the greenest school model and work to align school-based social interactions with sustainability principles.
$10,000.00
2016

Fresh Air Learning

Spreading Our Branches: Investigating Opportunities for Forest School Expansion in Metro Vancouver

Our project will create stronger connections between those who are part of the Metro Vancouver forest school movement. We will bring together existing catalysts in this movement interact with an eye to building an integrated plan to address the needs of children in our region. Anticipated participants include elementary school, early childhood, and outdoor educators, parents, staff from teacher education programs, and others who are part of the support system for this work, such as land managers and parent community developers. During a series of facilitated meetings, we will do the following: Identify key players who are currently part of or connected to the forest school movement Invite these individuals to a gathering in the late fall or winter of 2016 In the spring of 2017, hold small group meetings focused on areas such as teacher education, early childhood program development, elementary program development, and out of school care. The goals of the meetings will be as follows: Share resources and develop opportunities to learn from one another Understand how broader institutions such as child care licensing or teacher education can support this work Examine the needs, gaps, and opportunities to develop programs in different areas or for different groups of people Work with catalysts to determine what support they need to advance their projects. This process will develop a more cohesive plan for outdoor learning in Metro Vancouver.
$8,500.00
2016

Justice For Girls

Young Women and Girls Advocacy and Education Center

JFG will bring together community stakeholders, and in particular young women with experience of marginalization and homelessness in Vancouver, to shape our response to these systemic educational barriers. This community dialogue and current needs assessment will be organized and facilitated by a Project Team comprised of a JFG Team Leader, a Youth Advocate and 3-5 Youth Mentors who have experience of marginalization. The Develop Grant will fund this development process: 1. Apr.:Build Project Team *Training on girl’s rights, advocacy and accompaniment, interviewing skills, facilitating focus groups, leadership skills, public speaking, researching/analyzing data, etc. 2. May-Oct.:Engage Community *Stakeholder Engagement-conduct outreach, interviews, focus groups with "first voice" young women; their families; frontline youth, anti-violence and anti-poverty workers; educational and health professionals; Youth/ Women's/Aboriginal organizations, etc. *Research-current reports and promising practices nationally/internationally *Public Awareness-share learning through speaking engagements, writing, media, blogs, website, etc. with the intention of influencing public understanding, as well as educational policies, programs and training 3. Nov.:Create Project Plan *With the collected body of knowledge, create an innovative and strategic project plan with the goal of transforming the way we support and educate marginalized girls 2017: Test *Implement project plan and test
$10,000.00
2016

School District #59 - Peace River South

Adult Dogwood - Credentialing Adult Learners' Life Experiences

Adult learners, even those with literacy barriers, have accumulated a vast array of skills and knowledge through their life experiences. By interviewing and collecting tangible evidence of this knowledge and experience, DCLS will submit these to School District #59 so that educational outcomes can be proven to have been met. This process identifies and values the knowledge and experience of adults, and challenges the existing educational system wherein learners are given knowledge by instruction. This approach simultaneously respects the economic and educational system of structured required learning outcomes by helping adult learners choose which method suits them the best to demonstrate competency. By using the learners past life experiences combined with adult learner-centered distance learning at their own pace and at their preferred learning location, students will successfully complete their Adult Dogwood more quickly which will provide them with the pre-requisites to enroll in Post- Secondary education to further their education desires, or have the opportunity to apply for higher paying jobs that require a grade 12 education. SD59 and DCLS want to formalize an intake process as well as create course content that will be more appropriate for adult learners.
$10,000.00
2016

School District #6 - Rocky Mountain

Kootenay-Boundary Environmental Education (KBEE) Collaborative Initiative

This social innovation project will allow for all participants in the school system - students, teachers, administrators, parents and the broader community - to work together to develop and implement a region-wide plan. This social innovation project will influence this social system in the following ways: 1) Changing how we act and what we do as a learning community by influencing the culture to move place-based experiential learning from the margins to the mainstream. 2) Improving the flow of resources by identifying opportunities for effective collaboration across the region. 3) Enabling both teachers and students to be part of the planning and decision making process, thus increasing their empowerment, engagement and ultimately their learning experience. Citizens of the 21st Century need the skills and knowledge to be able to affect positive change. With increasing environmental pressures, the need for empowering both teachers and students is more important than ever. Intentionally connecting the districts, schools, and teachers of the region through environmental education (EE) and providing common awareness, access to professional development, resources, and opportunities will enhance the experience and learning of all of our students. The implementation of KBEE outcome-based plan will both offer educators opportunities to develop professionally, and prepare young people to transition through and out of the education system.
$10,000.00
2016

School District #63 - Saanich

Building relationships between youth and elders to begin reconciliation at Stelly's Secondary.

1. Invite district personnel and our Indigenous Cultural Leadership student group to engage local elders and a professional artist from each band, Tsartlip, Pauquachin, Tseycum and Tsawout with the Learning Commons area. 2. Working with elders, students and teachers, the artists will identify areas of the new curriculum that resonate with them as artists and as members of the local communities. 3. Artists will brainstorm with students and create project ideas to present to staff and students. 4. Working with the art teachers, shop teachers, First Nations support staff, and cultural staff, the artists will create work plans to include student collaboration and help. We envision students painting or carving along side the artists, talking, relating, and connecting. We envision local elders and community members participating through joining in the conversation and also by popping in to see the progress on the murals etc. 5. As local stories and legends, important physical land features or historical events become alive on the walls of the Learning Commons, not only will students be engaged with the space, but also a sense of ownership, pride and belonging will be developed. 6. Importantly, creating connections between elders who suffered through the residential school experience, demonstrating to the community that school is a place where all students can belong and feel welcome, will help to heal hurts and begin a process of reconciliation in our community.
$10,000.00
2016

Society for Canadian Women in Science and Technology

SCWIST – MS infinity Program (M+S = Math and Science, an infinity of choices)

Scaling the MS infinity program has the potential to change girls’ attitudes toward science, and their beliefs that there is a place for women in STEM fields. The scaling of this social innovation will start with our core programs (Program Component I). Our core programs are expanding to rural/remote communities and Aboriginal populations and therefore more girls can be reached. For Program Component II, partnered with Science World, SCWIST hosts the popular annual “Wonder Women” networking event where university age participants hear what led the Wonder Women to their STEM careers. SCWIST will hold focus groups with the MS infinity cohort to assess their needs and interests. Based on those results, the Wonder Women event will be adapted for high school. We foresee that the demand will be on access to educational/training programs; scholarships; volunteering, work experience; and resume development – resources that girls desperately need to be successful in STEM education and careers. Finally, through mentorship with women in STEM, these attitudes will be reinforced. SCWIST’s new MakePossible Mentorship Network is an on-line software platform designed to create a community that supports women in STEM. As young women emerge from high school and transition into higher education, a support network will be essential. We will grow the MakePossible network so that connections with the whole pool of MakePossible mentors will become available (Program Component III).
$10,000.00
2016

University of British Columbia Irving K Barber Learning Centre

Indigitization Futures Forum

New models of information practice, grounded in the needs of First Nations governance, language revitalization, heritage preservation and Indigenous access protocols requires a collaborative engagement between those trying to support community information and knowledge management needs, and the broader professional and academic community concerned with supporting these initiatives. The Indigitization team is committed to “clarifying process and identifying issues in the conservation, digitization and management of Indigenous community knowledge” and the Forum is an opportunity to learn from the communities what we can do that will best support this commitment. Supporting knowledge and information workers in communities requires the development of more appropriate tools, relevant training and assessment services in concert with the expressed needs of these practitioners. Now that communities are working to bring their analogue media into the digital realm, they have insights and questions that will inform the development of practices and more relevant information systems designed for the specific needs of Indigenous communities. Those working in the academic context do not have ready-made solutions. It is only by working together, sharing ideas, learning from false starts and successes in the community context that new, “disruptive” information practices will be developed that motivate changes in how information management is transformed in this context.
$10,000.00
2016