Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Dalai Lama Center for Peace and Education

Heart-Mind in Schools Project

The Dalai Lama Center wants BC children and youth to receive the best social-emotional learning possible—that is, an education that prepares them to cope with stress, get along with others, be compassionate, and solve problems peacefully. While the BC government has revised its curriculum to include expectations for social-emotional learning, few resources exist to help teachers integrate this transformative new curriculum expectation into their classrooms. The Heart-Mind in Schools project will provide educators the practical tools to integrate social-emotional learning into their classrooms—leading to a more holistic student education and a more compassionate and peaceful world.
$225,000.00
2018

Ecotrust Canada

North Coast Innovation Lab

The North Coast Innovation Lab (NCIL) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Prince Rupert. This project will complement the City’s vision for Prince Rupert and test how an intentionally designed innovation lab will bring capacity, resources, creativity, and solutions to bear on the serious problems facing the community. Because this is about systems change at a community level, there is potential for social innovation across a number of fronts. I.e. new partnerships between entrepreneurs, the business community, and academic institutions can change resource flows in terms of capital, human resources, and authority; and collaboration between indigenous and municipal governments can change policy and create active partnerships. The NCIL will build on learnings from the Local Economic Development (LED) Lab, an Ecotrust Canada collaboration with RADIUS SFU, place- based in Vancouver’s inner city, which was supported by the Vancouver Foundation in 2015. The theory, process and design of the NCIL is modeled on LEDLab but will scale beyond a neighbourhood level and test applicability in a municipal and northern context. As a holding place for creative collaborations, co-generating solutions, and adapting and prototyping new approaches, the Lab will play a key role in activating and actioning ideas coming forward through community engagement and visioning.
$225,000.00
2017

EMBERS

Testing a new model of earnings for people on social assistance at Eastside Works (formerly the Lux)

Many people on income assistance are willing and able to work but can’t within our mainstream system. Living with a disability and receiving income support limits the ability to work, yet people can and want to work on a part-time/occasional basis. Eastside Works is a social innovation project that will increase income generating opportunities for people left out of the mainstream economic system and engage policymakers to inform systemic changes that ultimately reduce poverty in BC. We will affect change on all three levels: Individuals - help them earn income to improve their current circumstances Organizations - provide interagency coordination Policy - inform systemic change.
$225,000.00
2018

HIPPY Canada (Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters)

Aboriginal HIPPY East Vancouver Project

Our project will address systematic marginalization of Aboriginal women and children who live in urban centres. Through a collaborative effort, we propose to revamp the program service delivery model to diminish the challenges of sole parenting, abject poverty, and domestic violence faced by Aboriginal women and children – who bear the brunt of economic disadvantage and social isolation. Our program will leverage the resilience demonstrated by Aboriginal peoples and bring isolated mothers and their children into a position of social productivity and cultural awareness, while developing the capacity of urban Aboriginal parents to support their children’s success in school.
$225,000.00
2018

Justice For Girls

Justice For Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre

JFG aims to influence systemic change in the education system by developing a Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre. This 3-year project will lay the foundation to pilot such a centre which will address the critical need for an innovative and integrated model of support, education and advocacy necessary for young women to truly transition out of poverty, homelessness, instability and violence. There are four ways that this project will influence systemic change: 1. Outreach and advocacy for girls marginalized from the school system • Targeted educational support and advocacy to facilitate school connection/reconnection and completion, freedom from violence, and adequate housing 2. Girls' Education & Empowerment • Girls rights education workshops in schools 3. Young Women’s Leadership program • 5-month full-time program providing an income, training and grade 12 or college-level course credits to young women as a pathway to graduation and leadership • young women will contribute experiential knowledge and peer support within JFG, and build the capacity of the education system by bringing their perspectives to education policies, programs and professional training 4. Public Education and Training • Professional development training for teachers, teachers in training, school counsellors and other education professionals • Public awareness campaigns • Engagement of partners, community stakeholders and champions to influence systemic change
$225,000.00
2017

NEC Native Education College

Northwest Coast Arts Heritage Project

The project will develop and strengthen networks and systems for Northwest Coast First Nations traditional cultural arts education and transmission. The project will build on the successful Northwest Coast Jewellery Arts certificate program at the NEC and the credit laddering partnership with Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Project partnerships will expand to the Kwaguilth, Nuu-Chah-Nulth, Haida, Tsimsian, Gitksan and Nisga'a Nations to develop further structures for formline art and silver carving transmission. This will include links with the Aboriginal owned cultural tourism facilities including the Haida Cultural Centre, U'Mista Cultural Museum, Aboriginal Tourism BC and educational facilities such as the Wilp Wilxo'osh'whl Nisga'a College and the Frieda Deising School of Northwest Coast Art. In addition to one delivery of the Northwest Coast Jewellery Arts certificate program in Vancouver, the program will be delivered in partnership with one First Nation or First Nations organization on Vancouver Island and one on the north coast over the duration of the project. The support letters from the community of Skidegate on Haida Gwaii and three First Nations near Port Hardy on Vancouver Island are appended. A diploma level of the program or a second certificate in Arts and Cultural Management will be developed by the project.
$224,000.00
2016

Pacific Autism Family Centre Society

GO Group

The GO Group strategy seeks to address the gap in employment equity services, with a focus on providing relevant vocational skills building and tangible work experience. Given our internal capacity, PAFC is uniquely able to implement a robust social enterprise strategy to fulfill operational needs. GO Group is a multi-venture social enterprise with a vocational development backbone; the GO Group ventures are: 1) GO Café, 2) GO Custodial, 3) GO Landscaping, 4) GO Business Solutions and 5) GO Innovation. GO (Goal Oriented) positions are paid, part-time employment positions, with a term ranging from 6 months to 2 years, based on person centered intake process, planning and goal acquisition. The intent of the GO position term is for individuals to articulate specific goals within a skill development framework focused on a position/industry they are interested in. When goals are achieved, individuals will be referred to an employment placement agency. PAFC will then assist the agency in securing the GO employee mainstream community employment. All operations would be inclusive, the ratio of neuro-typical staff to individuals with diverse abilities will depend on the business specific requirements of each venture. All GO employment is intentionally supportive with in house job coaching and support staff, specialized learning tools and peer mentorship components, all run through a standardized tracking and reporting method, such as the Open Badges learning management software.
$224,850.00
2016

The Prince George Activators Society

GroundWork PG Education and Employment Program (aka GWPG)

With the goal of affecting the routines, resources and beliefs on a micro and macro level, GWPG will be divided into 3 interwoven, successive components. Participants will begin with a 120 day Aboriginal Wellness and employment education program at Aghelh Nebun – a remotely located Aboriginal focused facility. Within the education component, participants will take a variety of courses which will help them overcome employment barriers. Courses that pertain to the housing industry (carpentry, drywall, painting) will be combined with life skill courses (First Aid, Financial Literacy and Conflict Resolution). Simultaneously, participants will work with Lheidli T'enneh Elder Marcel Gagnon in the Soaring with Eagles program which promotes healing through developing increased knowledge, discipline and self-awareness. The courses will be structured towards Aboriginal learners and a Cultural Education Assistant will work with the Elder and participants in a reciprocal learning environment - providing assistance and support as needed. After completing the 120 days, participants will begin the first of two paid work experience segments at Aghelh Nebun. While earning a wage, participants will utilize the skills they have acquired during the courses in a controlled work environment (2-8 months). When the participants are ready they will transfer into Prince George and further their employment experience working with various community organizations on the GWPG community crew (3-12 months).
$225,000.00
2016

UVIC - Office of Research Services

Diploma in Indigenous Community Development and Governance

The overall purpose of the diploma program as a social innovation project is to strengthen capacity of Indigenous communities with respect to governance and community development. Over the next six years, 60-80 graduates will contribute to Indigenous communities and influence significant systemic change. The program will help to develop related social innovation initiatives including the new Indigenous evaluation frameworks, performance measures and high impact in-community project reports that promote successful cases or offer solutions to community needs assessments. These initiatives will take place through coursework and capstone projects that demand real-world problem solving with in-community clients. We expect to strengthen the governance and self-determination aspirations and capacity of Indigenous peoples across BC in traditional areas and urban settings. The program will have wide-spread effect because it features accessible distance delivery with appropriate face-to-face connections and is steeped in community perspectives. Graduates’ ability to manage, negotiate and advocate on behalf of their communities will influence systemic change. We expect within 1 year of graduation, graduates will strengthen their communities directly and indirectly with about: - 40% taking on advanced positions in community through a leadership role. - 40% taking on advanced positions through a leadership role in organizations impacting on Indigenous communities.
$225,000.00
2016