Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Ashoka Canada

Changemakers Competition on First Nations, Metis and Inuit Education

Changemakers is a community of action where individuals around the world collaborate on solutions to solve the world’s most pressing social problems. Our online platform brings together 130,000 contributors from around the globe. Participants submit ideas, collectively identify the best social solutions, and then collaborate to refine, enrich, and implement those solutions. With the McConnell Foundation, we identified a Changemakers competition as a way to find innovations in the field of education, as well as to make meaningful connections between grassroots innovators and the philanthropic sector in Canada. Ashoka Canada is launching reRooting Education: Inspired Approaches to First Nations, Métis and Inuit Learning. We are looking to find, map and generate innovative ideas and strategies to improve First Nations, Métis and Inuit students’ engagement and success in education. Top entries will be recognized with prizes, which will be awarded at a closing summit. Additional prizes will acknowledge outstanding entries from specific geographic regions or thematic topics.
$50,000.00
2011

B.C. Association of Family Resource Programs

Path to Learning Pre-Course

The purpose of this project is to develop a specialized pre-course to engage potential learners who are continually left behind. In 2009 FRP-BC completed the development of the FRP Certificate and partnered with the Justice Institute of BC in the delivery. Over 150 applications were submitted for the 2009-2010 offerings. 52% of applicants did not meet the basic eligibility requirements. It was decided that a specialized pre-course was required. The Path to Learning Pre-course (PLP) is unique from other "Adult Boost Camps" as it will be developed through an Aboriginal self-reflective lens while bridging other cultures. The training will include a mentoring component to build capacity & self-esteem. The PLP is a 2 day on site offering with 10 hours of post mentoring. The PLP will incorporate 4 components to enable learners to: 1. Recognize & adjust to the rigors of post-secondary education 2. Build confidence & dispel the fears of school 3. Understand why post-secondary learning is vital to their work with families 4. Understand the foundations of family support theory & practice
$60,000.00
2011

British Columbia Conservation Foundation

Species at Risk in the Classroom, from Concept to Action

Through work with a number of schools and environmental stewardship groups the SCCP has identified a need for increased education opportunities on conservation of species at risk. To address this, the SCCP secured multi-year funding to develop curriculum guidance and activities for both formal and informal educators with a specific focus on South Coast species and the ecosystems they depend upon. From that “Species at Risk in the Classroom” (SARitc) evolved along with the SCCP’s first children’s storybook on local endangered species (“The Lonely Frog”); developed with a First Nations artist in the Fraser Valley to create accompanying illustrations and link endangered species education to First Nation traditional ecological knowledge. This project will take “SARitc” to the next level, moving from conceptual resources to working directly with teachers and informal educators, sharing conservation expertise, helping implement new curriculum resources and provide hands-on opportunities to get involved in endangered species and ecosystems recovery and restoration.
$53,675.00
2013

CIVIX

CIVIX Education: Project B.C.

The project will foster a systemic commitment to Student Vote and civic engagement within the education system, and improve the instructional capacity of educators in lead up to the 2017 provincial election. CIVIX will strengthen relationships with education stakeholders and administrators through in-person meetings and strategic communications to increase the scope and impact of the program, and facilitate expanded outreach strategies and support networks of institutional entrepreneurs. CIVIX will coordinate Democracy Bootcamp(s) to train teachers to become ambassadors of democracy in their school community. This will result in more positive and widespread outcomes among students in the key areas associated with future voting, such as increasing political knowledge and interest, and fostering a sense of civic duty. Working towards improved teacher capacity and commitment not only generates better Student Vote results, but creates systemic change by instilling the importance of democratic engagement and contributing to greater civic education outcomes for years to come. Student Vote also has an impact beyond the classroom. A 2011 independent evaluation reported that the program fostered political dialogue at home and 20% of parents agreed that their child’s participation in Student Vote positively affected their decision to vote. Scaling Student Vote deep and out is expected to grow this broad outcome and increase political participation among older Canadians as well
$60,000.00
2016

Building Students Into Citizens

Building Students into Citizens is a two-part project designed to strengthen communities and inspire the future of our democracy. CIVIX will equip teachers with the knowledge and tools to build the habits of informed and engaged citizenship among youth. British Columbia schools and students have only ever participated in Student Vote federal and provincial elections. With the average voter turnout at municipal elections well below 50%, it is crucial that youth develop a greater understanding of local government and their rights and responsibilities as citizens. This fall, CIVIX will recruit and support teachers in the delivery of the first ever Student Vote local election in BC. More than 25,000 students under the voting age will learn about the electoral process and local issues, and participate in an authentic vote on the official candidates in their municipality. Following the local elections, CIVIX will bring together teachers for a professional development conference to share best practices, improve instructional capacity and inspire a desire to build students into citizens.
$60,000.00
2014

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

Southlands Elementary International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program

This three-year evaluation research process will illuminate the impact of a new International Baccalaureate (IB) program on the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students who attend Southlands Elementary, a public Vancouver school in which a significant proportion of the student population is Aboriginal. The school is implementing the Primary Years Program (PYP) of IB and including Musqueam culture in its program, which is a new aspect of IB programming. This study will discover the degree to which the efforts to transform the public elementary school succeed and whether the local Musqueam First Nation community finds the new school programming an effective model of schooling for their children. In addition, the IB, Southlands School and VSD are highly interested the results of this innovative program. Two additional outcomes include (1) the plausibility of extending the IB PYP/Aboriginal approach to other public schools in the Vancouver School District and British Columbia; and (2) applying the evaluation model and tools developed for this project to other school sites.
$50,000.00
2011

Emily Carr University of Art and Design Foundation

Urban Access to Aboriginal Art

Urban Access is planned as a two part project. It begins as a 4-week intensive and inter-generational art and design program that blends studio instruction with cultural studies modules and field-trips. Held from July 2 – 26, 2013, the program will bring together participants to learn five traditional forms of art: carving, drum making, cedar basketry, beadwork, and moose hair tufting. The hands-on modules will be led by elders and senior artists, and will be complemented with field trips, guest artist talks and cultural studies instruction that will bring context and broader knowledge to the studio form itself. Part two involves the video recording of the studio instruction, and the creation of an online open access portal to share the lessons. Recruitment for the program will focus on two principles: engaging urban Aboriginals and ensuring inter-generational knowledge and transfer sharing. To meet these principles, Urban Access will have participants, comprised equally of three groups: high school students; adults 18-35; and adults over 35.
$59,225.00
2013

Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies-JUMP

Increase math achievement among students in Aboriginal communities

In response to teachers' and community leaders' requests for curriculum and training, JUMP Math (JUMP) will undertake a two-year pilot project to implement its programs in 7 schools in Nisgaâ, Terrace, Kitwanga and Kitkatla communities, to: - Increase program dissemination to reach 930 students each year. - Increase math achievement among all students, even as we eliminate the gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students. - Increase math teaching skills of over 50 teachers in Aboriginal communities over the next 2 years. - Eliminate math anxiety among teachers and students. - Demonstrate efficacy of the program through evidence-based evaluation. JUMP will undertake to: - Provide training and ongoing support to teachers working in communities and schools with predominantly Aboriginal students. - Provide teacher handbooks, student workbooks and related materials. - Measure the efficacy of these programs. JUMP programs will be evaluated by UBC Professor, Linda Siegel. We expect this research to stimulate greater community and philanthropic support for expansion of these programs.
$60,000.00
2011

Learning Buddies Network of the Lower Mainland Society

Learning Buddies Network tutoring (LBN)

Dr. A. Lipson, a pediatrician conceived of LBN in 2008. She observed a population of disadvantaged struggling grade 1-4 learners whose self esteem was faltering related to low school achievement. These children could access high quality medical care and pediatric assessment, yet their family circumstances did not allow access to simple one-on-one learning support and mentoring. She saw an unmet need for support for these children who typically have social and/or educational disadvantages. The idea of LBN was to pair secondary school or UBC students seeking meaningful volunteer experiences with these children. We provide one-on-one trained tutoring weekly in their schools in group sessions, focussing on academics, games, providing mentoring and instilling confidence. The children of interest attend inner city schools and may be disadvantaged economically and/or socially. LBN has grown and developed our own resources, and now provides reading and math volunteer tutoring in 15 programmes in Vancouver, Richmond and Burnaby.
$60,000.00
2013

North Shore Multicultural Society

NEONOLOGY 2.0

NEONOLOGY 2.0 emerged from the success of the NEONOLOGY Initiative. Under the direction of NSWAC (NS immigrant planning table - 17 orgs), NSMS developed NEONOLOGY as a model of best practices in diversity and anti-oppression education. NEONOLOGY has engaged more than 3000 grade 10 students in workshops exploring power, privilege, stereotypes, and the underlying causes of discrimination. Over 80% of these students indicated that the workshops increased their understanding of discrimination and its impact on the community. Students and teachers urged NSMS staff to offer a similar workshop to younger students, saying that students need to understand issues of diversity before entering high school. Research confirmed discrimination and isolation as risk factors for NS children preparing for high school1. In response to this need NSMS will deliver NEONOLOGY 2.0, a program engaging grade 6/7 students in developmentally appropriate anti-oppression and anti-bullying themed workshops in their classrooms. Students in grades 10-12 will be trained to provide mentorship to the grade 6/7 student.
$60,000.00
2012

School District #37 - Delta

Enhancing Aboriginal Learning and Connections: Student Led Inquiries in BC

Over the last 12 years, the Networks have been successful in developing the capacity of BC educators to deliver quality and equity education for BC students. Drawing on this successful educator leadership model, we would now like to extend our focus to student leadership and connectedness to the school community. The current Networks employ teacher-led inquiry projects to further their own professional learning and the learning outcomes of their students. This new project will be built around student-led inquiry projects that involve students, educators, and school communities, particularly through the Aboriginal Schools Enhancement Network. We seek funding to support the following activities: student-led inquiry-based projects in 40 school communities in BC, involving the school community (i.e. families, Elders, community partners); adaptive learning for educators to enable them to carry out this model with success and confidence; and pre- and- post analysis of students’ learning and connectedness to school/community.
$50,500.00
2012

School District #5 - Southeast Kootenay

Continuing the Journey with the Elders

The project is to continue to have Elders at Mount Baker Secondary School. We have for the past two years had 3 Ktunaxa Elders and 2 Metis Elders as part of our school. It is part of the school’s comprehensive plan to support Aboriginal learners and Aboriginal Education. This continuation will allow for a fuller and deeper integration of the Elders into the school system. Currently, the youth seek out the Elders when they need their guidance, help and support as do teachers and staff. The Elders interact in many ways: they teach cultural practices, help students research their ancestry, support and teach Ktunaxa language, provide support in all aspects of Aboriginal Education programs, are part of Restorative Justice, provide a first voice in classes especially First Nations Studies 12, Social Studies and English First Peoples, develop leadership skills with students, are role models, are advisors on Aboriginal Education, take part in events and most importantly are Elders (in the deepest most authentic sense). Knowing that culture cannot be programmed, programs can reflect culture).
$60,000.00
2011

School District #50 - Haida Gwaii/Queen Charlotte

Haida Gwaii Semester in Natural Resource Studies

The HG Semester in Natural Resource Studies addresses the paucity of post-secondary opportunities for residents of Haida Gwaii and provides economic development for rural communities. The vision is for locally integrated university education inspired by the people, communities, and environment of Haida Gwaii. The program offers students from Haida Gwaii and across British Columbia an immersion opportunity in a unique resource-dependent community where the issues facing resource managers around the globe converge at a local scale. By improving access to education for aboriginal and non aboriginal students this innovative program contributes to the sustainability of rural communities and households by increasing economic opportunities for local workers and businesses. Our approach to teaching allows students to learn from local knowledge holders, academics and researchers, providing critical linkages between traditional knowledge and western science. This dialogue between knowledge systems re-enforces collaboration and partnership between aboriginal and non aboriginal communities.
$60,000.00
2011

School District #62 - Sooke

Nature Kindergarten

Sooke School District intends to offer a Nature Kindergarten program, beginning in September 2012, that provides Kindergarten students with outdoor learning every morning regardless of the weather. In natural, outdoor settings, the students will engage in increased physical activity and develop strong connections to the natural world and the Aboriginal Ways of Knowing. This model was inspired by forest preschools, which were started in northern Europe almost fifty years ago, and can now be found throughout Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. The Nature Kindergarten will be taught by both a Kindergarten teacher and an early childhood educator (ECE). This teaching model and program are unique within the B.C. public school system. Nature Kindergarten aims to address a growing need for young children to spend more time outdoors connecting to nature. University research partners will study the academic, personal and social benefits of this model. This is a two-year 'proof of concept' pilot, that, if successful is hoped to be replicated in school districts across B.C. and beyond.
$60,000.00
2012

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through a Different Lens

The two components of our project will be to expand the number of teachers allowing students to use their preferred method of demonstrating their learning and to build the capacity of these teachers to assess the intended learning outcomes regardless of the methods students choose. Each of these components will require four steps: 1) The introduction of teaching and assessment strategies to allow for alternate demonstrations of understanding in regular classroom practice. 2) The actual implementation of new instructional and assessment methods. This stage will involve coaching by the mentor teachers as well as side-by-side teaching as these strategies are incorporated into actual classrooms. 3) The evaluation of the implementation process. 4) The re-adjusting of instruction and assessments. After the evaluation and reflection, adjustments will be made before similar strategies are implemented in the future. Our project will be implemented with groups of teachers from six schools: 2 elementary schools (K-5), 2 middle schools (6-8) and 2 Secondary Schools (9-12).
$50,000.00
2011

School District #83 - North Okanagan- Shuswap

Coyote Cafe - after School Literacy Program

Coyote Cafe is an after school reading program, which our Aboriginal Education department implements in partnership with Literacy Alliance, Okanagan Library, and the First Nations Education Council. Currently, the elementary program is implemented for 25 weeks in 4 of our most vulnerable schools. The mandate is to provide literacy support to struggling readers; helping to boost their reading skill, confidence, and enjoyment. This program has proven successful with elementary readers; therefore, we would like to extend this program to our 3 middle schools in order to increase middle school students reading success. Coyote Cafe success lies in the structure of the program. Coyote Cafe meets twice a week providing students with a healthy snack, group reading, and one to one reading support, literacy games and special activities which include trips to the library, and outdoor activity. The program is based on a strong cultural practice of drumming, songs and enriched Aboriginal content material. Not only does students' stamina for reading increase but their love of reading does too!
$53,500.00
2013

Spo7ez Cultural Centre and Community Society

Aboriginal Youth Ambassador - 2010 Curriculum Formalization Project

Aboriginal youth ages 17 to 30 will have the opportunity to receive industry-recognized training, exposure to the post-secondary education environment, and meaningful work experience at high-traffic tourism venues. This proven model is designed to create opportunities for high-risk Aboriginal youth, who primarily live on reservations and face poverty and low literacy. It strengthens cultural connections by working with elders and indigenous cultural experts from the Squamish and Lil’wat Nations and assists in developing successful work and education patterns. This highly successful model, designed to create opportunities for high risk aboriginal youth, who primarily live on reservations and face multiple barriers (e.g. poverty, low literacy levels), strengthens cultural connections by working with elders and other indigenous cultural experts from a range of Squamish and Lil'wat Nation aboriginal communities and assists in developing successful work and education patterns. Funding provided by the Vancouver Foundation for this project will enable the formalization of the program and provide for 3.0 credit. This credit will create a bridge to further education and increase opportunities for participants.
$50,000.00
2010

Take A Hike, Youth at Risk Foundation

Expansion

In 2005, Take a Hike was enabled to double its program and hire a part-time Executive Director to increase its impact on youth. Five years later, we're reaching out to the Vancouver Foundation to support our second growth phase; offering the program in additional communities throughout BC. One of our Foundation's five objectives in its 2010/2011 strategic plan is to increase impact and reach through program expansion. We will empower communities to adopt (and adapt) the Take a Hike program to suit their specific needs so more youth can experience the life-changing benefits that Take a Hike has to offer. The Take a Hike Foundation has identified 4 key steps to move the growth initiative forward, and IN CAPS, I've identified our progress: 1) Identify a suitable growth model (governance, fundraising, reporting, etc.) COMPLETE 2) Develop a community capacity assessment tool (market scorecard). COMPLETE 3) Build relationships with new communities. IN PROGRESS 4) Create a Resource Kit (a Take a Hike manual for other communities) and Training Program TO COMMENCE IN MAY 2011
$55,000.00
2011

UBC - Okanagan

Aboriginal Mentorship Program

Some Aboriginal students face challenges when returning to their communities. Both communities and students often feel that students’ new skills and knowledge were not developed through an indigenous lens. This project identifies and mitigates breakdown points, and helps students share what they’ve learned with their community. Using a structured, three-month mentorship model, students develop, deliver, manage and evaluate a community development program while building relationships with their community.
$50,000.00
2010

University of British Columbia

Mathematics First Nations and Inner City K -12 outreach

This project focuses on enabling inner city aboriginal youths in the Lower Mainland and at First Nations schools throughout BC to acquire the necessary mathematical skills to enroll in post-secondary programs in science, engineering and other technical professions. This will be achieved through a combination of activities targeting both students and teachers, including summer math camps, mentorship programs, homework clubs and teacher training workshops. In Vancouver, a year-round support network will be established for at-risk students, including: tutoring by undergraduate mentors, homework clubs and summer math camps. There will be a camp for students transitioning into high school and a separate one for seniors, where students will have an opportunity to work with scientists and other faculty at UBC. Summer camps and mentorship programs will be further expanded to First Nations schools throughout BC. In addition, regular teacher training workshops on mathematics will be organized both in Vancouver and at several First Nations schools, seeking to enhance teaching skills.
$60,000.00
2012

WSÁNEC School Board

STÁ,SEN TTE SENCOTEN- Language Revitalization and Sustainability Plan

This project will facilitate the revitalization and sustainability of the Sençoïen language at their band-operated school. Their five-year mission is to establish immersion programming from pre-school to Grade 3. They have hired six language apprentices to work with a language team, including three current language instructors who will soon retire. They seek on-going funding for their master/apprentice relationships between their 15 remaining fluent elders and their dedicated young adult apprentices.
$50,000.00
2010