Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Ashoka Canada

Changemakers Competition on First Nations, Metis and Inuit Education

Changemakers is a community of action where individuals around the world collaborate on solutions to solve the world’s most pressing social problems. Our online platform brings together 130,000 contributors from around the globe. Participants submit ideas, collectively identify the best social solutions, and then collaborate to refine, enrich, and implement those solutions. With the McConnell Foundation, we identified a Changemakers competition as a way to find innovations in the field of education, as well as to make meaningful connections between grassroots innovators and the philanthropic sector in Canada. Ashoka Canada is launching reRooting Education: Inspired Approaches to First Nations, Métis and Inuit Learning. We are looking to find, map and generate innovative ideas and strategies to improve First Nations, Métis and Inuit students’ engagement and success in education. Top entries will be recognized with prizes, which will be awarded at a closing summit. Additional prizes will acknowledge outstanding entries from specific geographic regions or thematic topics.
$50,000.00
2011

B.C. Association of Family Resource Programs

Path to Learning Pre-Course

The purpose of this project is to develop a specialized pre-course to engage potential learners who are continually left behind. In 2009 FRP-BC completed the development of the FRP Certificate and partnered with the Justice Institute of BC in the delivery. Over 150 applications were submitted for the 2009-2010 offerings. 52% of applicants did not meet the basic eligibility requirements. It was decided that a specialized pre-course was required. The Path to Learning Pre-course (PLP) is unique from other "Adult Boost Camps" as it will be developed through an Aboriginal self-reflective lens while bridging other cultures. The training will include a mentoring component to build capacity & self-esteem. The PLP is a 2 day on site offering with 10 hours of post mentoring. The PLP will incorporate 4 components to enable learners to: 1. Recognize & adjust to the rigors of post-secondary education 2. Build confidence & dispel the fears of school 3. Understand why post-secondary learning is vital to their work with families 4. Understand the foundations of family support theory & practice
$60,000.00
2011

Clayoquot Biosphere Trust Society

Sustainability Studies Curriculum Development

The Clayoquot Biosphere Trust is excited to develop curriculum for an upper-level, elective course entitled Sustainability Studies to be offered in our region. The aim of the course is build environmental awareness and leadership in high school students through innovative education. Sustainability Studies content will be relevant to students. Clayoquot Sound provides an ideal setting to introduce youth to a wide variety of perspectives, enabling in-depth and holistic investigations essential to understanding environmental issues. The region is also fortunate to host many local experts, from First Nations elders to scientists, who will be invited to work with the students. The course will focus on the connection between people and their environment, with units on topics such as sustainable development, ecosystem-based management and civic engagement. The content will be developed through a collaborative process with input from students and teachers. As a regularly offered elective, the course will create an ongoing structure for youth engagement and hands-on learning.
$10,000.00
2011

CRES

Snewaylh-Aboriginal Teachings

Snewaylh is the Squamish word for "teachings". CRES, in conjunction with Vancouver Co-op Radio, is working on a project to help re-vitalize the teachings of the Aboriginal language by bringing Aboriginal youth and elders together and by using new technologies to pass on traditional teachings. We are using the aural medium of radio to support the vital need to preserve the oral teachings of Aboriginal languages and cultures. The Snewaylh radio program uses the airwaves to teach both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities about the languages and traditions of the original peoples. This project engages two Aboriginal youth to produce a radio show as an important way of developing pride and understanding of their culture while gaining concrete, transferable skills. The project comes full circle when the youth become mentors themselves, training a new generation of volunteers to produce the show and thereby ensuring the sustainability for the radio show while gaining another important component of experiential learning themselves.
$10,000.00
2011

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

Southlands Elementary International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program

This three-year evaluation research process will illuminate the impact of a new International Baccalaureate (IB) program on the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students who attend Southlands Elementary, a public Vancouver school in which a significant proportion of the student population is Aboriginal. The school is implementing the Primary Years Program (PYP) of IB and including Musqueam culture in its program, which is a new aspect of IB programming. This study will discover the degree to which the efforts to transform the public elementary school succeed and whether the local Musqueam First Nation community finds the new school programming an effective model of schooling for their children. In addition, the IB, Southlands School and VSD are highly interested the results of this innovative program. Two additional outcomes include (1) the plausibility of extending the IB PYP/Aboriginal approach to other public schools in the Vancouver School District and British Columbia; and (2) applying the evaluation model and tools developed for this project to other school sites.
$50,000.00
2011

Indian Residential School Survivors Society

Residential Schools - Truth and Learning

Partner to develop engaging educational resources for students within the school system that will supplement current Social Studies curriculums. These will describe and illustrate the history of Indian Residential Schools (IRS), the role of Churches and Government, and the impact the schools have had on First Nation’s people & non-natives. Create mobile exhibits to be rotated among schools, colleges, universities etc. and in the lobbies of participating corporations with the goal of educating employees about IRS & to create funding, scholarships & job mentoring opportunities. Develop a proposed permanent education and research centre at UBC to supplement the First Nation’s Studies Program, House of Learning, Museum of Anthropology, Long House, First Nations Library etc. By creating interactive, multi-media displays that bring the experience of Residential Schools to life, the exhibits will assist educators by enhancing the resources of their in-class curriculum and generate additional interest in the subject with native & non-native people.
$40,000.00
2011

Junior Undiscovered Math Prodigies-JUMP

Increase math achievement among students in Aboriginal communities

In response to teachers' and community leaders' requests for curriculum and training, JUMP Math (JUMP) will undertake a two-year pilot project to implement its programs in 7 schools in Nisgaâ, Terrace, Kitwanga and Kitkatla communities, to: - Increase program dissemination to reach 930 students each year. - Increase math achievement among all students, even as we eliminate the gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students. - Increase math teaching skills of over 50 teachers in Aboriginal communities over the next 2 years. - Eliminate math anxiety among teachers and students. - Demonstrate efficacy of the program through evidence-based evaluation. JUMP will undertake to: - Provide training and ongoing support to teachers working in communities and schools with predominantly Aboriginal students. - Provide teacher handbooks, student workbooks and related materials. - Measure the efficacy of these programs. JUMP programs will be evaluated by UBC Professor, Linda Siegel. We expect this research to stimulate greater community and philanthropic support for expansion of these programs.
$60,000.00
2011

Multifaith Action Society of B.C. (MAS)

Be The Change Student Initiative - BTC

Gladly, high school "Green Clubs"; have community organizations help with group projects like school gardens and elective courses are now being offered by concerned teachers. Taking this further into the mainstream, BTC positions Sustainability & Leadership as an appealing curriculum module within Planning 10 - a course that all highschool students need to graduate. Learning by doing, students make "sustainable lifestyle choices" in this innovative 16 week module that features: 1) inspiring, educational, video-enriched school presentations; 2) a "Student Action Guide" filled with important actions to choose from; 3) a Facebook application that makes tracking actions fun & easy; 4) a dialogue process in "Action Circles" where students report on actions and dialogue on personal experiences; and 5) a teacher training course/manual to make it easy for any teacher to deliver. Although targeting Planning 10 in B.C., this module may be used in courses such as Leadership, Social Justice, Critical Thinking, and Civics in provinces across Canada. This is the global mind-shift in action!
$30,000.00
2011

Peace It Together Conflict Transformation Society

Building Bridges through Film and Dialogue

This project will empower ten Canadian university students (alongside 10 israeli and 10 Palestinian students) to use dialogue and filmmaking to inspire thousands of Canadians to build bridges between Jewish, Muslim, and Arab communities within Canada (and throughout the world). These students will participate in a 4-week dialogue and filmmaking program with visiting Palestinian and Israeli students. They will gain a deep understanding of the Palestinian/Israeli conflict in a professionally facilitated environment of dialogue and creative exploration, and then in mixed cultural groups they will co-create short films about the conflict, from conception to final editing. Their films will premiere at a screening of over 600 people at the end of the summer program. In the year following the summer program, these ten Canadian students will become Project Leaders and screen their films on university campuses and via the internet in order to inspire fellow students to create intercultural understanding among Jewish, Muslim and Arab communities on their campuses.
$25,000.00
2011

School District #36 - Surrey

Parents As Literacy Supporters in Aboriginal Communities (APALS)

The "Parents As Literacy Supporters in Aboriginal Communities"; program, herein after referred to as "PALS", will be delivered in the common rooms of 5 Kekinow Native Housing Complexes and in 5 elementary schools (with highest Aboriginal populations) to increase participation levels of Aboriginal parents and their children (0-6) in mainstream Early Childhood Programs; promote positive home to school transitions; and ensure Aboriginal children are ready for school. An Aboriginal Early Childhood Educator and an Aboriginal Elder will engage approximately 300 Aboriginal children (100 per year), aged 0 - 6, and their families in APALS sessions throughout the course of three school years. Each session will consist of a wide range of fun, educational, and culturally appropriate early childhood development activities, such as: storytelling, singing, drumming, "Make and Take" cultural craft activities, circle time, group reading, group discussions, and literacy/numeracy activities. Families will also receive a culturally appropriate Aboriginal book at each session to take home and keep.
$45,000.00
2011

School District #5 - Southeast Kootenay

Continuing the Journey with the Elders

The project is to continue to have Elders at Mount Baker Secondary School. We have for the past two years had 3 Ktunaxa Elders and 2 Metis Elders as part of our school. It is part of the school’s comprehensive plan to support Aboriginal learners and Aboriginal Education. This continuation will allow for a fuller and deeper integration of the Elders into the school system. Currently, the youth seek out the Elders when they need their guidance, help and support as do teachers and staff. The Elders interact in many ways: they teach cultural practices, help students research their ancestry, support and teach Ktunaxa language, provide support in all aspects of Aboriginal Education programs, are part of Restorative Justice, provide a first voice in classes especially First Nations Studies 12, Social Studies and English First Peoples, develop leadership skills with students, are role models, are advisors on Aboriginal Education, take part in events and most importantly are Elders (in the deepest most authentic sense). Knowing that culture cannot be programmed, programs can reflect culture).
$60,000.00
2011

School District #50 - Haida Gwaii/Queen Charlotte

Haida Gwaii Semester in Natural Resource Studies

The HG Semester in Natural Resource Studies addresses the paucity of post-secondary opportunities for residents of Haida Gwaii and provides economic development for rural communities. The vision is for locally integrated university education inspired by the people, communities, and environment of Haida Gwaii. The program offers students from Haida Gwaii and across British Columbia an immersion opportunity in a unique resource-dependent community where the issues facing resource managers around the globe converge at a local scale. By improving access to education for aboriginal and non aboriginal students this innovative program contributes to the sustainability of rural communities and households by increasing economic opportunities for local workers and businesses. Our approach to teaching allows students to learn from local knowledge holders, academics and researchers, providing critical linkages between traditional knowledge and western science. This dialogue between knowledge systems re-enforces collaboration and partnership between aboriginal and non aboriginal communities.
$60,000.00
2011

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through a Different Lens

The two components of our project will be to expand the number of teachers allowing students to use their preferred method of demonstrating their learning and to build the capacity of these teachers to assess the intended learning outcomes regardless of the methods students choose. Each of these components will require four steps: 1) The introduction of teaching and assessment strategies to allow for alternate demonstrations of understanding in regular classroom practice. 2) The actual implementation of new instructional and assessment methods. This stage will involve coaching by the mentor teachers as well as side-by-side teaching as these strategies are incorporated into actual classrooms. 3) The evaluation of the implementation process. 4) The re-adjusting of instruction and assessments. After the evaluation and reflection, adjustments will be made before similar strategies are implemented in the future. Our project will be implemented with groups of teachers from six schools: 2 elementary schools (K-5), 2 middle schools (6-8) and 2 Secondary Schools (9-12).
$50,000.00
2011

Simon Fraser University Faculty of Education

Metro Region Environmental Learning Dissemination Project

In 2010, members of the Institute for Environmental Learning began working to disseminate the BC Ministry of Education's Environmental Learning and Experience guide across British Columbia and Yukon through a series of Professional Development seminars, conferences and workshops funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). These on-going activities have been focused on dissemination in under-served regional districts outside Metro Vancouver, however, we are requesting that the Vancouver Foundation's Education Committee support a sustained effort to disseminate the Environmental Learning and Experience guide within the Metro Vancouver region from 2011-2013. Through professional development sessions, conferences and networking events, and new efforts to revise learning resources in the non-formal sector in collaboration with institutions like Science World and Vancouver Aquarium, this project is focused in the heart of the province's urban and suburban population base, where sustainable development and place-based education are much needed and highly relevant.
$20,000.00
2011

SPARC BC Society

Professional Development for Teachers on Teaching about Homelessness

Learning about Homelessness in BC: A Guide for Senior High-School Teachers by Jennifer Hales (2010) is a new resource that provides lesson plans and materials for high school teachers interested in teaching about homelessness. This pilot project will support the dissemination of this guide through a series of workshops in up to ten (10) school districts across Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley. An Advisory Committee will be established to provide guidance in the design, delivery and evaluation of the teacher training workshops.
$27,200.00
2011

Take A Hike, Youth at Risk Foundation

Expansion

In 2005, Take a Hike was enabled to double its program and hire a part-time Executive Director to increase its impact on youth. Five years later, we're reaching out to the Vancouver Foundation to support our second growth phase; offering the program in additional communities throughout BC. One of our Foundation's five objectives in its 2010/2011 strategic plan is to increase impact and reach through program expansion. We will empower communities to adopt (and adapt) the Take a Hike program to suit their specific needs so more youth can experience the life-changing benefits that Take a Hike has to offer. The Take a Hike Foundation has identified 4 key steps to move the growth initiative forward, and IN CAPS, I've identified our progress: 1) Identify a suitable growth model (governance, fundraising, reporting, etc.) COMPLETE 2) Develop a community capacity assessment tool (market scorecard). COMPLETE 3) Build relationships with new communities. IN PROGRESS 4) Create a Resource Kit (a Take a Hike manual for other communities) and Training Program TO COMMENCE IN MAY 2011
$55,000.00
2011

Terra Nova Schoolyard Society

East Richmond Schoolyard Program

Building on the success of programming at the Terra Nova, we would like to expand the programming to work with areas that are underserved with a higher proportion of low-income and recent immigrant youth. As well, we would like to start an intergenerational program of having seniors with gardening/farming experience mentor students. Project Goals 1. Work with 2 elementary schools in East Richmond (Mitchell and McNeely) 2. Have 250-300 students participate in programming 3. Recruit 20-30 seniors (gardeners/farmers) to work with students 4. Recruit 2-3 farmers to act as program mentors 5. To continue to grow the program within Richmond. Begin succession planning: In order to continue to offer expanded training, the Richmond Schoolyard Society will need to begin training other trainers for the program. This could involve one individual on a full time basis or a number of potential trainers on a part time basis. Regardless, the RSS will begin a process of transitioning some of the programming to these new trainers.
$35,000.00
2011

Thompson Rivers University Foundation

Meeting the Needs of First-Generation and Aboriginal Students

The proposed project would provide support for first-generation and aboriginal students at two crucial points in their academic decision-making and transition: high school and the first year of university studies. Both programs are premised on the importance of providing role models and mentorship from older students. The first component is a set of summer camp workshops that will encourage Aboriginal high school students to plan for success in post-secondary education and promote their interest in potential careers in science and health sciences. Workshops include two one-week, on-campus programs for Aboriginal youth in Grades 8-9 and 10-12. The second is a mentoring program that will provide first-generation students (Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal) with support and comprehensive knowledge of university services and resources. Upper-year, first-generation students will be selected and trained as mentors to work with incoming students. The regular meetings between mentors and mentees will be focused on topics such as time management, goal setting, and study habit development.
$25,000.00
2011

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Pacific Wild/Coastal Connections-Virtual Rainforest Initiative

Coastal Connections- Virtual Rainforest Initiative (CC-VRI) is an educational program focused on utilizing new technology, experiential learning and locally-relevant resources connect youth in place-based communities to with the lands and waters of their traditional territories. Piloted in the coastal First Nations communities of Bella Bella and Hartley Bay, the program uses interactive white boards, remote wildlife webcams, and outdoor natural history training to bring ecology and conservation to life and to cultivate a new generation of stewards and natural resource managers in the Great Bear Rainforest. This collaborative effort between Pacific Wild, local community groups such as QQS Projects and the Gitga'at Land and Resources Stewardship Society, the Bella Bella and Hartley Bay community schools, along with the American Museum of Natural History and the Nature Conservancy, strives to develop an educational model that will provide youth with the passion and skills needed to pursue education and employment opportunities in science and conservation for years to come.
$70,000.00
2011

Striving for an "A" in Aboriginal Education

Tides Canada Initiatives, in collaboration with Tyee Solutions Society (TSS), proposes to explore a variety of experiments in Aboriginal-led education in B.C. through an innovative journalism project, published in multiple media outlets. TSS will tell the nuanced stories of these new experiments in culturally-responsive education: the challenges, but mostly the promising early successes. We propose to focus on five B.C. communities; to listen, learn, and build relationships, and to formally interview, report and photograph. Stories will be intended for the general public but will also be in-depth enough to be a useful resource for people working on the ground to affect change, aboriginal and non-aboriginal. This project builds on recent education reporting by Katie Hyslop, and on her masters’ thesis for the UBC School of Journalism on child poverty in Hazelton, which involved traveling to the community and interviewing politicians, Aboriginal families, a representative of the Gitxsan treaty office, and others. You can find her recent education reporting here: http://thetyee.ca/Bios/Katie_Hyslop/
$9,845.00
2011