Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

School District #39 - Vancouver

Cultivating the School Food System

Cultivating the School Food System is about empowering teachers and students in learning, growing and serving healthy food. When students have access to healthy, local, and delicious food, it is believed that that academic confidence will increase and discipline and behavioural issues decrease. , , Students learn better when they eat healthy food. We connect this work to the “Good Food” movement in Canada and the United States which focuses on food that is: healthy, green, fair, and affordable. , CSFS is a multifaceted, collaborative approach to enhance student learning, support teacher and staff innovation in teaching, and eating healthy, delicious, local food. It aims to shift attitudes and behaviours of students and support teachers and food providers to make systemic change in teaching practice and food provision. Programs support students across the VBE, focusing on vulnerable youth in E. and S. Vancouver, in Renfrew Collingwood, and Victoria-Fraserview, regions where youth food insecurity and poverty are prominent. CSFS addresses: Food Literacy: CSFS is transformative on-site learning for students. Creating opportunities for experiential and inquiry-based learning, it hosts training for educators; year-round field to fork programming for students, prepares youth with employment skills. Access: CSFS provides healthy, schoolyard farm grown food for the school community. It supports healthy school meal programs by facilitating an expert working group comprised of VBE staff, community partners, and FR to recommend and implement strategies for increasing food access. School Food System (SFS): CSFS inspires and supports schools to make large-scale shifts in purchasing, food service operations and student meal choices through a bundle of programs under the working title “BC Wednesdays.” This grant will support the teachers that want to do more. Already three schools have self-identified as wanting to participate in BC Wednesdays.
$150,000.00
2015

Roots in Community

In 2013, the VSB and Fresh Roots built two schoolyard market gardens: 14,000 sq. ft. spaces where healthy food is grown for the school community. The gardens are outdoor classrooms for the schools as well as gathering places for the surrounding community. Teachers have begun exploring how to achieve BC’s core curricular objectives in an outdoor classroom, engaging their students through new methods. We have piloted partnerships with neighbourhood houses where Newcomers to Canada and food insecure families grow friendships and knowledge in the gardens. The garden has become a place for the school and surrounding community to engage with learning and with one another. As the gardens have grown, teachers, students, and community partners are asking for more workshops, programs and facilitated engagement, exploring core curriculum, sustainability and building community within the schoolyard market gardens. Roots in Community works with Fresh Roots to hire a community coordinator to develop, facilitate, and execute experiential learning opportunities for the school community.
$15,000.00
2014

Enriching Heritage Fairs

Heritage Fairs is a national program that has become a fixture in BC schools. For years the Fairs have inspired grade 4 to 10 students to explore and enjoy aspects of Canada’s heritage. While Heritage Fairs have been highly successful, our consultations with community partners, including program designers, regional coordinators and teachers, reveal interest in expanding the appeal and enriching the educational value of Fairs. This involves encouraging more rigorous historical thinking in projects; examining more substantive topics to deepen students’ understanding of Canadian heritage, and nurturing qualities of engaged citizenship. We propose a two-pronged approach: 1) develop two online teacher resources: embedding historical thinking (65 pages, including 6 lesson plans) and enhancing inquiry in social studies (40 pages and 6 PowerPoint tutorials); 2) offer 20 one-to-two hour professional development opportunities (14 face-to-face and 6 online sessions) to support 400 teachers in Vancouver and around the province in infusing enhanced Heritage Fairs projects into their teaching.
$24,800.00
2013

Stories from the elders

Students will work with Pacific Cinémathèque to create short videos connecting them with their community elders. They will create visual stories identifying culture, detailing elder relationships and sharing the individual stories of elders and youth. The students will use music, technology and media to share stories with each other, their community and their families.
$5,000.00
2010

School District #40 - New Westminster

Aboriginal Student Retention Project

This project targets at-risk students in Grades 4 to 7 and Aboriginal youth in Grades 10 to 12 in New Westminster. Cultural teachings, social/emotional and academic support are available during the day, but students also need after-school support. The program will run twice a week at two inner-city schools. Project facilitators will train and support mentors to model healthy behaviours while developing leadership skills and ancestral pride in at-risk children. The goal is to help students develop positive self-esteem, make healthy choices and engage with positive Aboriginal role models.
$30,000.00
2010

School District #43 - Coquitlam

Red Wolf Spirit Adventures

The Coquitlam School District Aboriginal Education (CSDAE) in partnership with Outward Bound Canada will facilitate together an outdoor education program that will balance adventure based learning with cultural teachings. Red Wolf Spirit Adventures will be facilitated in two separate programs; the Suwa'lkh Learning Centre (SLC) and the Aboriginal Youth Leadership Council (AYLC) The Suwa'lkh Learning Centre is hosted by SD#43 Aboriginal Education. The program is inclusive; however, Aboriginal students comprise approximately 98% of the 35 students attending this school. This program provides a more personalized learning environment for students. Youth at this school have typically had more personal challenges to overcome in their lives. The AYLC is comprised of Aboriginal students in grades 9 and 12 that are viewed as having positive leadership qualities. For the current school year we have 48 enrolled students in this programThe objective of this group is to continue developing their leadership skills through planning and hosting community events as a way of giving back.
$100,000.00
2013

School District #5 - Southeast Kootenay

Continuing the Journey with the Elders

The project is to continue to have Elders at Mount Baker Secondary School. We have for the past two years had 3 Ktunaxa Elders and 2 Metis Elders as part of our school. It is part of the school’s comprehensive plan to support Aboriginal learners and Aboriginal Education. This continuation will allow for a fuller and deeper integration of the Elders into the school system. Currently, the youth seek out the Elders when they need their guidance, help and support as do teachers and staff. The Elders interact in many ways: they teach cultural practices, help students research their ancestry, support and teach Ktunaxa language, provide support in all aspects of Aboriginal Education programs, are part of Restorative Justice, provide a first voice in classes especially First Nations Studies 12, Social Studies and English First Peoples, develop leadership skills with students, are role models, are advisors on Aboriginal Education, take part in events and most importantly are Elders (in the deepest most authentic sense). Knowing that culture cannot be programmed, programs can reflect culture).
$60,000.00
2011

School District #50 - Haida Gwaii/Queen Charlotte

Haida Gwaii Semester in Natural Resource Studies

The HG Semester in Natural Resource Studies addresses the paucity of post-secondary opportunities for residents of Haida Gwaii and provides economic development for rural communities. The vision is for locally integrated university education inspired by the people, communities, and environment of Haida Gwaii. The program offers students from Haida Gwaii and across British Columbia an immersion opportunity in a unique resource-dependent community where the issues facing resource managers around the globe converge at a local scale. By improving access to education for aboriginal and non aboriginal students this innovative program contributes to the sustainability of rural communities and households by increasing economic opportunities for local workers and businesses. Our approach to teaching allows students to learn from local knowledge holders, academics and researchers, providing critical linkages between traditional knowledge and western science. This dialogue between knowledge systems re-enforces collaboration and partnership between aboriginal and non aboriginal communities.
$60,000.00
2011

School District #59 - Peace River South

Adult Dogwood - Credentialing Adult Learners' Life Experiences

Adult learners, even those with literacy barriers, have accumulated a vast array of skills and knowledge through their life experiences. By interviewing and collecting tangible evidence of this knowledge and experience, DCLS will submit these to School District #59 so that educational outcomes can be proven to have been met. This process identifies and values the knowledge and experience of adults, and challenges the existing educational system wherein learners are given knowledge by instruction. This approach simultaneously respects the economic and educational system of structured required learning outcomes by helping adult learners choose which method suits them the best to demonstrate competency. By using the learners past life experiences combined with adult learner-centered distance learning at their own pace and at their preferred learning location, students will successfully complete their Adult Dogwood more quickly which will provide them with the pre-requisites to enroll in Post- Secondary education to further their education desires, or have the opportunity to apply for higher paying jobs that require a grade 12 education. SD59 and DCLS want to formalize an intake process as well as create course content that will be more appropriate for adult learners.
$10,000.00
2016

School District #6 - Rocky Mountain

Kootenay-Boundary Environmental Education (KBEE) Collaborative Initiative

This social innovation project will allow for all participants in the school system - students, teachers, administrators, parents and the broader community - to work together to develop and implement a region-wide plan. This social innovation project will influence this social system in the following ways: 1) Changing how we act and what we do as a learning community by influencing the culture to move place-based experiential learning from the margins to the mainstream. 2) Improving the flow of resources by identifying opportunities for effective collaboration across the region. 3) Enabling both teachers and students to be part of the planning and decision making process, thus increasing their empowerment, engagement and ultimately their learning experience. Citizens of the 21st Century need the skills and knowledge to be able to affect positive change. With increasing environmental pressures, the need for empowering both teachers and students is more important than ever. Intentionally connecting the districts, schools, and teachers of the region through environmental education (EE) and providing common awareness, access to professional development, resources, and opportunities will enhance the experience and learning of all of our students. The implementation of KBEE outcome-based plan will both offer educators opportunities to develop professionally, and prepare young people to transition through and out of the education system.
$10,000.00
2016

School District #62 - Sooke

Nature Kindergarten

Sooke School District intends to offer a Nature Kindergarten program, beginning in September 2012, that provides Kindergarten students with outdoor learning every morning regardless of the weather. In natural, outdoor settings, the students will engage in increased physical activity and develop strong connections to the natural world and the Aboriginal Ways of Knowing. This model was inspired by forest preschools, which were started in northern Europe almost fifty years ago, and can now be found throughout Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. The Nature Kindergarten will be taught by both a Kindergarten teacher and an early childhood educator (ECE). This teaching model and program are unique within the B.C. public school system. Nature Kindergarten aims to address a growing need for young children to spend more time outdoors connecting to nature. University research partners will study the academic, personal and social benefits of this model. This is a two-year 'proof of concept' pilot, that, if successful is hoped to be replicated in school districts across B.C. and beyond.
$60,000.00
2012

School District #63 - Saanich

Building relationships between youth and elders to begin reconciliation at Stelly's Secondary.

1. Invite district personnel and our Indigenous Cultural Leadership student group to engage local elders and a professional artist from each band, Tsartlip, Pauquachin, Tseycum and Tsawout with the Learning Commons area. 2. Working with elders, students and teachers, the artists will identify areas of the new curriculum that resonate with them as artists and as members of the local communities. 3. Artists will brainstorm with students and create project ideas to present to staff and students. 4. Working with the art teachers, shop teachers, First Nations support staff, and cultural staff, the artists will create work plans to include student collaboration and help. We envision students painting or carving along side the artists, talking, relating, and connecting. We envision local elders and community members participating through joining in the conversation and also by popping in to see the progress on the murals etc. 5. As local stories and legends, important physical land features or historical events become alive on the walls of the Learning Commons, not only will students be engaged with the space, but also a sense of ownership, pride and belonging will be developed. 6. Importantly, creating connections between elders who suffered through the residential school experience, demonstrating to the community that school is a place where all students can belong and feel welcome, will help to heal hurts and begin a process of reconciliation in our community.
$10,000.00
2016

Choosing a Path for the Future

Our innovative idea to find innovative ways to support the sense of belonging for our Indigenous students by increasing student and staff capacity regarding Indigenous ways of knowing and learning. Our hope is through education we will find reconciliation for all of our indigenous learners and their families which will improve the grade to grade transition of our students and ultimately have more students graduating from school and crossing the stage with "dignity, options, and purpose." By providing inservice, training and experiential opportunities for teachers to learn about Indigenous ways of knowing and learning through intergeneration learning and teacher we will help teachers to broaden their understanding of integrating culturally relevant and meaningful learning opportunities for Indigenous students while providing non-indigenous students with rich learning connected to the lands and history of their surroundings. Our primary focus and vision is to provide educators with the tools, knowledge, skills, and learning opportunities that will help them see that Indigenous Education is for everyone and together with their colleagues they will have the capacity to transform these systems through an increased cultural competency and practice.
$10,000.00
2015

School District #67 - Okanagan Skaha

Through a Different Lens

The focus of this project is on the regular classroom: making learning more engaging and relevant for all students – rather than removing students to other programs. We are attempting to remove some of the barriers to success that many of our vulnerable students face (eg., over reliance on reading and writing); create strength-based classrooms where students can use their strengths to learn in alternative ways (technology, filming, creating, building, comics, interviews); and provide rich, relevant and meaningful learning opportunities. We began with in-class innovations in teaching and learning and are now supporting cross curricular and “outside” the classroom experiences – in the environment, on the reserve, and in intergenerational settings. Our application for a grow grant is to reach more classrooms and go deeper in those that have already been involved. Our school district has consistently achieved an 80-85% Six Year Completion Rate. The 10-15% of students that do not graduate consist of students of Aboriginal ancestry, students with a behavioural designation, students who have had difficulty with literacy through their school careers, and issues such as anxiety, drugs, alcohol. The two biggest groups are students of Aboriginal ancestry and those with behavioural designations. We have students as young as grade 9 leaving school. The school district has some alternative schools, career education, and other support systems, which support many students.
$150,000.00
2015

Through A Different Lens

The two components of our project are to expand the number of teachers using innovative teaching and assessment practices which are allowing students to use their preferred method of demonstrating their learning; and to build the capacity of these teachers to assess the intended learning outcomes regardless of the methods students choose. Each of these components require four steps: 1) the introduction of teaching and assessment strategies to allow for alternate demonstrations of understanding in regular classroom practice, 2) The implementation of new instructional and assessment methods, which will involve coaching by the lead teachers as well as side-by-side teaching, 3) the evalution of the implementation process, and 4) the readjusting of instruction and assessments. Our project is currently being implemented with groups of teachers from 6 schools: 2 elementary (k-5), 2 middle (6-8) and 2 secondary (9-12). In Year 2, we would like to increase the number of teachers involved at each of these six schools, and if possible increase the number of schools.
$100,000.00
2012

Through a Different Lens

The two components of our project will be to expand the number of teachers allowing students to use their preferred method of demonstrating their learning and to build the capacity of these teachers to assess the intended learning outcomes regardless of the methods students choose. Each of these components will require four steps: 1) The introduction of teaching and assessment strategies to allow for alternate demonstrations of understanding in regular classroom practice. 2) The actual implementation of new instructional and assessment methods. This stage will involve coaching by the mentor teachers as well as side-by-side teaching as these strategies are incorporated into actual classrooms. 3) The evaluation of the implementation process. 4) The re-adjusting of instruction and assessments. After the evaluation and reflection, adjustments will be made before similar strategies are implemented in the future. Our project will be implemented with groups of teachers from six schools: 2 elementary schools (K-5), 2 middle schools (6-8) and 2 Secondary Schools (9-12).
$50,000.00
2011

School District #70 - Alberni

Grade 9 Aboriginal Awareness Event

The project came about as a result of an assignment that was given to students in our Social Justice 11/12 class. They were asked the questions, "Is there racism at ADSS and what does it look like"? The students identified that there was racism and in some cases described what it looked like. School District 70 and Alberni District Secondary School have been aware of racism and have addressed it in individual cases. We needed a plan that would reach a greater number of people Plan of action: *Look at what we already have in place *Grade 9 students would be the target group *Committee of grade 9 teachers, administration and First Nation Youth Care worker to work on plan *work with teachers and First Nations Resource experts to create units that would fit into each subject's curriculum. There will be 5 components 1. Curriculum implementation. 2. Lunch time activities. 3. Cultural performance. 4. Windup activity. 5. Celebration luncheon.
$3,000.00
2012

School District #75 - Mission

Super Science Club

Super Science Club is an innovative after-school program that provides science and technology educational activities to students in Grades 1-6 attending designated schools. The primary goal with this program is to inspire at-risk children to be inquisitive about the world around them, and to develop a long-term interest in science and technology. The schools chosen have a high population of aboriginal students and a lower socio-economic demographic. Each term of the Super Science Club involves nine weekly visits to the school facilitated in partnership with UFV and a presentation by Science World during the final week. During each visit, a 75-minute session is held for groups of Grades 1-3 students (primary level) and for Grades 4-6 students (intermediate level). Students from the local high school, parents and elders are invited to participate and provide leadership in the sessions and healthy snacks are provided. Teachers are invited to a 'chat and chew' where they can acquire science knowledge and resources to develop continuity in the classroom.
$5,000.00
2012

School District #79 - Cowichan Valley

Khowemun Pre-School/Kindergarten Smart Table Culture & Language Project

This project focuses on meaningfully integrating Aboriginal language and culture into the daily routine of pre-school and kindergarten programs at Khowhemun School. While Cultural Teaching Assistants are working desperately to revitalize Aboriginal students’ connection to their language and culture, there is a certain degree of concern that it is almost “too little, too late.” The language and culture needs to be integrated throughout the day. The Cultural Teaching Assistants and elders have designed culture and language activities, including using integrated interactive technology to provide resources in the classroom and follow-up practice in the computer labs.
$23,460.00
2010

School District #83 - North Okanagan- Shuswap

Coyote Cafe - after School Literacy Program

Coyote Cafe is an after school reading program, which our Aboriginal Education department implements in partnership with Literacy Alliance, Okanagan Library, and the First Nations Education Council. Currently, the elementary program is implemented for 25 weeks in 4 of our most vulnerable schools. The mandate is to provide literacy support to struggling readers; helping to boost their reading skill, confidence, and enjoyment. This program has proven successful with elementary readers; therefore, we would like to extend this program to our 3 middle schools in order to increase middle school students reading success. Coyote Cafe success lies in the structure of the program. Coyote Cafe meets twice a week providing students with a healthy snack, group reading, and one to one reading support, literacy games and special activities which include trips to the library, and outdoor activity. The program is based on a strong cultural practice of drumming, songs and enriched Aboriginal content material. Not only does students' stamina for reading increase but their love of reading does too!
$53,500.00
2013

Student Engagement Project

Our goal is to improve student engagement and increase High School completion rates in our school district. Our project will enable 15 self-selected teachers to improve their instructional practices with the aim of increasing student engagement and overall student satisfaction at the Middle and High School level. We would like to narrow the gap between current research on student engagement and teaching practices. An important focus for this project is improving the current graduation rates for Aboriginal students in our district. The district graduation rate for students of Aboriginal ancestry is 61.0%, while the non-Aboriginal graduation rate is 78.6%. Specific strategies to engage aboriginal learners will be a focus throughout this project. We have two primary objectives (1.) increase the number of teachers using innovative teaching and assessment practices to enable students to use their preferred method of demonstrating their learning; and (2.) to build the capacity of these teachers to assess the intended learning outcomes regardless of the methods students choose.
$10,000.00
2012

Science Fair Foundation of BC

Quest for Science Fair Champions

This is the second year of a multi-year program, Quest for Science Fair Champions (Quest), designed to equip the science teachers of BC, from K-12, with the tools to implement inquiry-based instruction in their classrooms. In year one of the program, we recruited 20 teachers from 7 of the 14 Science Fair regions to 4 Smarter Science workshops held in Vancouver that provided these teachers with the skills to train their colleagues in inquiry-based science teaching. In turn, they provided shorter workshops to more than 500 additional teachers & are continuing this work. In year two, we expect to complete our coverage of the Province by holding the Smarter Science workshop component of the Quest program in Kelowna, Prince George & Fort St. John. As well, in partnership with the Office of Indigenous Education, Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University (SFU), we will make a concerted effort to recruit teachers from areas with large concentrations of Aboriginal students, throughout the Province, in order to increase the participation rate of these students in the Science Fair program.
$45,000.00
2013

Quest for Science Fair Champions

Development & implementation of a multi-year program for better outcomes & greater impact responding to needs for Teacher Recruitment/Training & a Recognition Program - providing tools to strengthen classroom teachers. SFF BC works with the volunteer Regional Science Fair (RSF) committees to increase awareness/interest in the importance of science & to address the issues facing the province in building science capacity. We support science education through supporting the classroom teacher & thus the students. SFF BC’s involvement in the Provincial Government’s successful Year of Science (YoS) project provided information & impetus for this project-identifying the following needs if student participation is to be maintained and grown: • Recruitment of teachers to replace those retiring; • Expansion of the program in underserved areas of the province; • Training for new teacher ‘champions’ to enable them to incorporate Science Fair activities into the curriculum; • Provision of a recognition/incentive program to recognize the significant volunteer contribution made by teachers.
$35,000.00
2012

SFU - Centre for Dialogue

CityStudio Vancouver: Education and Community Hub

Education and Training. We have a powerful learning community of students, alumni, faculty and administrators, City staff and elected leaders, and community builders. We need to deepen their collaborative learning experiences and impact by building and practicing the skills needed to respond to the big challenges that cities face. We are helping to create the workforce that our future cities need, today. We need to build new partnerships that reflect the full diversity of learning and action that happens in the city. Community Learning Hub. We need an interactive communications tool set and strategy to enable project development that results in creating higher quality projects that can be shared. We want to increase the use of our studio space as a hub of skills building, action, changemaking and connection amongst young people, educators, city-builders and organizations. We want to more fully use our skills, experience, and space to encourage network building, experimentation, and deliver real-world projects that matter. Organisational Learning. We need a stronger organisational structure to be resilient and grow our impact. This project is key to us establishing charitable non-profit status, a Board, and good governance and management practices. Ongoing evaluation needs to become more meaningfully integrated into our work in order to more deeply understand the effectiveness and impacts of our social innovations in the communities and systems that we work.
$100,000.00
2016

CityStudio Vancouver

Cities around the world will need to spend trillions of dollars in the next decade in response to the complex demands of population, energy, resource depletion and climate change. Our students want to help change the world AND they want to earn a living. As the key project within Vancouver's Campus City Collaborative (C3) CityStudio Vancouver is an energetic hub of learning and leadership where students design and implement Vancouver's Greenest City goals. CityStudio is a collaboration of the City of Vancouver and 6 colleges and universities to engage students in the following ways: 1. Greenest City Solutions. CityStudio directly involves students in designing solutions for Vancouver's Greenest City 2020 goals 2. Student Leadership towards a Green Economy. Course work emphasizes mentoring and training for emerging sustainability leaders to identify and develop opportunities in the green economy. 3. Energetic Hub of Learning. In year one, CityStudio involved over 480 students and 18 instructors contributing over 20,000 hours of action learning towards the Greenest City Goals.
$134,000.00
2012

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