Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

UBC - Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Building Resiliency: Growing Food and Farmers

Four-Season Food Literacy: Hands-On Training for Farmers & Eaters (FSFL) will provide season extension education & training for aspiring & established farmers, gardeners, urban farmers and the general public. By modeling 4 methods of protected agriculture (hoophouses, high & low tunnels, and cold frames) we will provide the basis for hands-on workshops on season extension for all growers. The curriculum of our Practicum in Sustainable Agriculture (PSA) will be diversified to include season extension practices and we will expand the physical space used for farmer training. The increased scope of the PSA will help us provide aspiring agriculturalists with high-quality, hands-on, experiential training in ecologically based growing methods that will prepare them to meet today’s farming challenges. We willl present workshops to the general public that will equip Vancouverites with the necessary skills to eat locally year-round. FSFL has the overarching goal of creating a more food & farming literate population that can grow & eat more food year-round, increasing local food system resiliency.

UBC - Okanagan

Aboriginal Mentorship Program

Some Aboriginal students face challenges when returning to their communities. Both communities and students often feel that students’ new skills and knowledge were not developed through an indigenous lens. This project identifies and mitigates breakdown points, and helps students share what they’ve learned with their community. Using a structured, three-month mentorship model, students develop, deliver, manage and evaluate a community development program while building relationships with their community.

University of British Columbia

Mathematics First Nations and Inner City K -12 outreach

This project focuses on enabling inner city aboriginal youths in the Lower Mainland and at First Nations schools throughout BC to acquire the necessary mathematical skills to enroll in post-secondary programs in science, engineering and other technical professions. This will be achieved through a combination of activities targeting both students and teachers, including summer math camps, mentorship programs, homework clubs and teacher training workshops. In Vancouver, a year-round support network will be established for at-risk students, including: tutoring by undergraduate mentors, homework clubs and summer math camps. There will be a camp for students transitioning into high school and a separate one for seniors, where students will have an opportunity to work with scientists and other faculty at UBC. Summer camps and mentorship programs will be further expanded to First Nations schools throughout BC. In addition, regular teacher training workshops on mathematics will be organized both in Vancouver and at several First Nations schools, seeking to enhance teaching skills.

University of British Columbia Irving K Barber Learning Centre

Indigitization Futures Forum

New models of information practice, grounded in the needs of First Nations governance, language revitalization, heritage preservation and Indigenous access protocols requires a collaborative engagement between those trying to support community information and knowledge management needs, and the broader professional and academic community concerned with supporting these initiatives. The Indigitization team is committed to “clarifying process and identifying issues in the conservation, digitization and management of Indigenous community knowledge” and the Forum is an opportunity to learn from the communities what we can do that will best support this commitment. Supporting knowledge and information workers in communities requires the development of more appropriate tools, relevant training and assessment services in concert with the expressed needs of these practitioners. Now that communities are working to bring their analogue media into the digital realm, they have insights and questions that will inform the development of practices and more relevant information systems designed for the specific needs of Indigenous communities. Those working in the academic context do not have ready-made solutions. It is only by working together, sharing ideas, learning from false starts and successes in the community context that new, “disruptive” information practices will be developed that motivate changes in how information management is transformed in this context.

University of the Fraser Valley

S'iwes Totí:lt Q'ép - Teaching and Learning Together: Indigenizing the Academy

'Indigenizing the Academy' is about integrating and centering Indigenous people and their knowledge in education. Most post-secondary institutions adopt tenets of indigenization but still face administrative challenges related to curriculum, student experiences, governance, recruitment/retention of Indigenous faculty and students. The project idea arises from UFV's Education Plan, which recognizes the need to recruit/retain Indigenous faculty, maximize success of Indigenous students, and develop relations with Indigenous communities to benefit all students and universities. Members of Canadian post-secondary institutions will be served by this project, specifically senior administrators, staff/faculty, community stakeholders including Elders, education coordinators and Indigenous students. The project promotes knowledge exchange between institutions via: a two-day gathering of teams of institutional representatives on indigenization; a Stó:lo Sweat and Feast; DVDs from events; a cross-institutional audit; interactive website; and a manual of challenges and best practices.

University of Victoria - Faculty of Law

Human Rights within Indigenous Law: A collaborative toolkit for educators

We want to support Indigenous laws’ capacity to be applied, critically evaluated, openly debated, and adapted or changed as needed. Our vision is for Indigenous laws to be living and in use on the ground - to be researched, taught and theorized about just as other great legal traditions of the world are. Revitalizing Indigenous laws and building tools for engagement, such as this Indigenous Human Rights Toolkit, is essential for re-building healthy Indigenous citizenries and creating more respectful and symmetrical relationships across legal traditions in Canada. These are necessary steps to build and maintain robust reconciliation within and between peoples, now and for future generations.

UVIC - Faculty of Education

Bachelor of Education in Indigenous Language Revitalization, Tahltan Language

This funding application is for the development and delivery of the Diploma in Indigenous Language Revitalization, leading to a Bachelor of Education specifically adapted for the Tahltan language, and the goals of the Tahltan Central Council. The project will take place over three years in the traditional territories of the Tahltan people, centralized in Dease Lake. The three communities, central to this program proposal are Iskut, Telegraph Creek, and Dease Lake. The first year of the project will serve as a development year, with community consultations, community-university partnerships development, students and instructor recruitment. The second and third years will deliver the UVIC, Diploma in Indigenous Language Revitalization, in Dease lake. The overall project scope includes graduating teachers with a full Bachelor of Education, who are proficient enough in the Tahltan language to teach in immersion settings. This program will address the Tahltan Central Council priorities by supporting overarching language revitalization objectives.

UVIC - Office of Research Services

Diploma in Indigenous Community Development and Governance

The overall purpose of the diploma program as a social innovation project is to strengthen capacity of Indigenous communities with respect to governance and community development. Over the next six years, 60-80 graduates will contribute to Indigenous communities and influence significant systemic change. The program will help to develop related social innovation initiatives including the new Indigenous evaluation frameworks, performance measures and high impact in-community project reports that promote successful cases or offer solutions to community needs assessments. These initiatives will take place through coursework and capstone projects that demand real-world problem solving with in-community clients. We expect to strengthen the governance and self-determination aspirations and capacity of Indigenous peoples across BC in traditional areas and urban settings. The program will have wide-spread effect because it features accessible distance delivery with appropriate face-to-face connections and is steeped in community perspectives. Graduates’ ability to manage, negotiate and advocate on behalf of their communities will influence systemic change. We expect within 1 year of graduation, graduates will strengthen their communities directly and indirectly with about: - 40% taking on advanced positions in community through a leadership role. - 40% taking on advanced positions through a leadership role in organizations impacting on Indigenous communities.

Vancity Community Foundation

Creating Inclusive Schools for Low income Students and Families

Through the engagement of low income parents and students alongside teachers, this project will develop and deliver learning activities for school teachers, principals, trustees and parents designed to deepen their understanding of the systemic causes of family poverty and the way income inequality is experienced by poor students and parents in schools. Working with one diverse urban school district over 3 years, we will develop, test and deliver workshops for these different audiences with the aim of eliminating discriminatory practices and policies affecting low income students’ full inclusion and empowering low income parents and students to be part of the advocacy for these changes.

Vancouver Community College Foundation

Mentorship Program for Aboriginal Children In the Vancouver School District

We are requesting support to establish a Pilot Mentorship Program in 8 Vancouver School Board Schools-4 elementary feeder schools and 4 high schools-with significant Aboriginal student populations. Approximately 220 students will be involved. The Pilot Mentorshlp Program will begin in the Fall of 2013 and continue through to the end of the school year (June 2014) at which time it will be evaluated with the goal of continuation in the Vancouver District for a total of 3 years prior to expansion to other strategic areas in BC. The key elements of the Mentorship Program are: -recruitment of Aboriginal Mentors with teaching experience -mentorship in course materials, study habits, life skills and career planning -use of both 'one on one' and group models where appropriate -involvement of the Aboriginal Community -emphasis on helping students effectively transition from Elementary School to High School and Primary levels to Intermediate levels. -inculcation of career planning and work experience throughout the Mentorship Program -successful retention to high school graduation

Vancouver Homework Club Society

Youth Engagement Project (YEP)

Working with students identified as at high risk of dropping out of school, the project has six elements: 1) engaging on a one to one basis with the students and their parents, working to keep the students in school and attending class; 2) bringing the students to the Homework Club three days a week for a minimum of six hours, providing access to Homework Club tutors and to hot meals served at the Club; 3) working with the students, using approved remediation programs, to develop their literacy and numeracy skills; 4) meeting with the students monthly over dinner to review their progress, plan for the month ahead and create supportive relations between the students in YEP and with the YEP workers. 5) providing a small monthly cash stipend to be spent under the direction of each student's YEP worker; 6) upon successfull completion of each school year, holding in trust a bursary of $500 for post-secondary education.

Vancouver Island University

Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program

The “Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program" offers prison-based post-secondary academic courses to groups composed of both university students (hereinafter called outside learners) and incarcerated students (hereinafter called inside learners) who learn together. Founded in 1997 in Philadelphia by one university professor inspired by one incarcerated man, the program is based on the simple hypothesis that incarcerated men and women and college/university learners might mutually benefit from studying together as peers. Together, they build classroom communities based on dialogue, collaboration and serious, shared inquiry. The Inside-Out Program places a human face on justice issues while giving both inside and outside learners a powerful academic and experiential learning opportunity, grounded in a philosophy recognizing that each human being has innate worth and a story to tell. Expansion of Inside-Out into Canada offers the chance to implement and evaluate the program’s impact in a country with a different population and systems. VIU will be among the first five universities in Canada, and the second Criminology department, to offer Inside-Out, building on the successful experiences of over 140 US universities and colleges.

Vancouver Out On Screen Film & Video Society

LGBT2Q+-inclusive education through effective policy creation and implementation

We will begin to scale our program by adding capacity within our team and conducting an environmental scan of the provincial education system, including an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that might impact our goals. We will identify both potential champions and laggards at the provincial, district, and school levels, and undertake targeted outreach to build relationships with these key stakeholders. Simultaneously, we will work with others to build political and administrative support at the provincial and district levels for SOGI policy and implementation, as well as the valuable training that Out in Schools provides. With the support of our champions, we will strategically participate in professional development days for teachers and support staff, equipping them with the tools and knowledge necessary to communicate change within their schools. While we currently reach teachers and support staff incidentally as part of our presentations within schools, scaling up will allow us to implement our program more strategically and at the network level across school districts. As we are working to encourage policy and curriculum improvements at the provincial and district levels, we will concurrently support new champions for these changes at the school level by strategically focusing the location of our presentations on districts that have not yet implemented SOGI policies and that we have assessed to have the greatest possibility for change.

Victoria Sexual Assault Centre Society

Integrating Trans Inclusion with Vancouver Island Service Providers

Through our own Trans Inclusion process, we have learned valuable lessons that we firmly believe would benefit other anti-violence organizations, and ultimately trans people beyond Victoria BC. We have also made connections with an amazing group of trans people who have co-developed and delivered trans inclusion workshops across Victoria to community organizations and Island health. We propose to focus trans inclusion primarily on other sexual assault centres and transition houses. We will use our curriculum, share resources and lessons learned to help other anti-violence organizations through their own trans inclusion process, and we will also employ a “hub and spoke” model of Trans Integration. In other words, VSAC will act as a “hub” of knowledge and information pertaining to becoming trans-inclusive, while other organizations will act as the “spokes”. Once other organizations have made sufficient change and put into practice their trans inclusion process, we will also show them how to be their own hub. To date, no other organization is doing trans inclusion work on this scale or using this model in the anti-violence sector. Further, Trans Inclusion with a Sexualized/Intimate Partner Violence lens is not being done elsewhere. Finally, this project will provide education developed and delivered by Trans people; create short-term employment and lifetime skills for trans people across Vancouver Island; and keep organizations accountable to trans community.

WSÁNEC School Board

STÁ,SEN TTE SENCOTEN- Language Revitalization and Sustainability Plan

This project will facilitate the revitalization and sustainability of the Sençoïen language at their band-operated school. Their five-year mission is to establish immersion programming from pre-school to Grade 3. They have hired six language apprentices to work with a language team, including three current language instructors who will soon retire. They seek on-going funding for their master/apprentice relationships between their 15 remaining fluent elders and their dedicated young adult apprentices.