Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Animals in Science Policy Institute

Replacing animals in secondary school science education

A switch to non-animal methods in education is important for animal welfare, education, and student empowerment. This project aims to understand the cultural shift in secondary teaching required so that non-animal alternatives for dissection are more readily adopted. We plan to: 1) survey BC teachers to assess their perspectives on dissection, and identify obstacles to and opportunities for the adoption of non-animal alternatives; 2) poll the BC public to assess their views on dissection; and 3) hold an expert panel event that will bring together international experts on the issue of non-animal alternatives for dissection to identify novel strategies for creating cultural change in teaching
$10,000.00
2017

Canadian Centre For Policy Alternatives

Tapping Into New Ideas - Promoting Sound Water Management in BC

This project will address key tools needed to better manage provincial water resources and to ensure their conservation. Two water policy briefs will be produced: one outlining a new framework for water use reporting (British Columbians do not have access to anything approaching a usable, publicly accessible database on water allocations and usage) and the other outlining a framework for ensuring that large industrial users of water pay adequately for the water they use, thus ensuring conservation and industry innovation.
$7,500.00
2011

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Redefining Get Outside BC (RGOBC)

RGOBC will change the way we act, what we believe and potentially the resources that flow to youth-centered programing. First, CPAWS-BC will accept that our current model of hosting a single summit in the Lower Mainland as the primary tool for youth engagement and leadership training is flawed. Instead, with the Vancouver Foundation’s support, we will host a four-day youth summit in Central Vancouver Island, the Okanagan, and the Kootenays, as well as focus and planning groups in various regions. To date, most youth programs are devised in Vancouver and implemented elsewhere. RGOBC will be devised and implemented locally, leaving space for the influence and sharing of ideas from other regions, ensuring a wider range of voices and experience are incorporated. Youth and a diverse group of educators, leaders and social innovators will collaborate in the program with the intention of critiquing, deconstructing and rebuilding the structure and approach. Youth will lead all aspects of the process. Non-youth participants, including potential corporate funders, will be engaged in the program, but will take guidance from youth throughout. It will help create “buy-in” for the concept and program, since adults will be part of the larger systemic change and will be asked to be a part of the long-term funding plan. The final program outcomes will be shared with the broader environmental community in an effort to change the wider movement. CPAWS-BC will demonstrate that change is possible
$9,000.00
2016

Central Okanagan Naturalists Club

Fascieux Creek Restoration and Habitat Conservation

In 2010, Ecole KLO Middle School students discovered Western Painted turtle eggs in their long jump sandpit. In the 1980’s, the part of Fascieux Creek, which bisects school property, was diverted into a culvert and covered with concrete pads interrupting the flow of the stream and destroying the turtle and fish habitat. When the eggs were discovered, the sandpit was fenced to protect the turtles, however, recognizing that only the restoration of the creek would ensure the future of the turtles, the students decided to naturalize the creek and restore the terrestrial and aquatic habitats. In 2010-11, the students and Green Parent Committee engaged Golder Associates, an environmental consulting firm, to complete a conceptual design on an in-kind basis. In 2012, CONC agreed to provide volunteer labor, funding help and expertise on creek and habitat restoration. Golder will do the Natural Environment Development Permit Application process and Environmental Impact Assessment, the procurement of all permits and determining the resources necessary to complete the earthworks.
$8,000.00
2013

David Suzuki Foundation

Charged Up: Accelerating Community-led Renewable Energy in BC

The conversation around climate change tends to leave individuals and communities feeling overwhelmed, powerless and full of anxiety. It often seems there is little we can do at the local level, and that what governments are doing is just not enough. Small-scale, community owned energy projects can empower communities to be part of positive, meaningful efforts to combat climate change through shared action. The Charged Up campaign will showcase community success stories, convene and train community leaders, and build a clean energy community who can support one another in addressing the technical, financial, and regulatory issues that come with clean energy projects.
$10,000.00
2017

Ecotrust Canada

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations
$10,000.00
2011

Environmental Youth Alliance

Inner-Nature: Developing a Connected Schoolyard Greening Project

THE SOIL - We will work with at least 3 classes at each of: 2 secondary & 1 elementary schools in Vancouver to pilot innovative, experiential learning in schoolyard green spaces. Our aim will be to find ways to engage students and teachers in learning about urban wildlife and creating schoolyard gardens to house a diversity of wild creatures. These programs will combine wildlife and food garden creation with citizen science programming. Our goal in the development phase of this project is to learn with youth & educators how schools can create and USE biodiverse natural spaces on their grounds. THE SCHOOL INSTITUTION - We will meet quarterly with: youth, administrators at each school, coordinators of Community School Teams, the VSB Sustainability Department, Youth Workers in the SACY program, community partners, and local alternate schools to discuss approaches for creating regular, sustainable nature access for vulnerable students. Together we will draft a template Memorandum of Understanding that the EYA can use as a framework to guide our partnerships with VSB schools and Community Hubs in the future. OUR FRIENDS IN THE VSFN - We will continue to meet with these partners to update them on our work with the school institution, and will seek to include multiple organizations from the VSFN in our work. Together we will set common goals, learn how to effectively collaborate and develop a shared narrative that we can use to broadly communicate our work.
$10,000.00
2015

Farm Folk / City Folk

Don't Pocket the Potatoes: Addressing Community Garden Theft in Richmond

While Richmond Food Security Society officially manages the community garden program, we work closely with a wide range of stakeholders. While each stakeholder has shared ideas on how to address the issue of community garden theft, we have yet to form an official project team to address this thoroughly and would like to do so. What we would like to do is form a project team who will work together to research possible solutions. This will include a detailed scan of best practices in other communities, resulting in a detailed webpage where Richmond Community gardeners can learn from. We would also like to conduct a survey of gardeners, in at least 3 languages to find out their personal experience with theft and their ideas to address it. This will provide gardeners with a necessary outlet for their concerns. We would also like to compare the thefts from 2015 to physical site characteristics to determine which physical features may deter thefts. We have only been tracking garden theft data for one year, and would like to track it again in 2016 in order to get a better understanding of the scope of this problem. While we only have data for one year, we have anecdotal and media evidence (through articles in the Richmond review dating back to 2013) that this problem is ongoing.
$10,000.00
2015

Fraser River Discovery Centre Society

FRDC's Outdoor Interpretive Panels

IIn the 1990s, the Fraser River Discovery Centre (FRDC) created a series of 22 visually exciting and thoughtprovoking interpretive panels which were displayed along a 1.3km riverfront boardwalk. The panels heighten awareness of environmental issues related to the Fraser River watershed; stimulate river advocacy and interpretation; and encourage community participation by fostering a stronger understanding, ownership and desire to act positively to affect the river's health. This project would replace damaged panels in September 2012 with updated design and information to coincide with Artists on the River, the FRDC’s annual festival celebrating Rivers Day.
$10,000.00
2011

Friends of Cortes Island

Cortes Island Stream Stewardship Program (CISSP)

This project addresses a community identified need to develop a formalized Stream Stewardship initiative on Cortes Island. Local volunteers have requested more advanced training to increase their knowledge and confidence in field skills, monitoring, data collection and management. In order to build local capacity, we would like to provide this training to our committed base of volunteers and to a new body of volunteers who have expressed interest. Through formal training, volunteers will have increased ability to monitor watershed quality over time. This data will be shared in meaningful ways with local and regional organizations in order to promote the preservation and rehabilitation of stream habitats. This project will engage a wide-range of community involvement in the assessment of existing salmon habitat, and will prompt greater awareness of how to observe, record, and report any important changes over time. This project will also establish a central repository for historical and future data in order to preserve these records and make this research available to the public.
$6,000.00
2014

Friends Of The Summerland Research Station Gardens

Innovative Landscaping for Water Conservation

Building on the momentum and success of our pilot project, the Friends are requesting assistance with this new phase of our water conservation program as it relates to our community outreach, water conservation survey, demonstration sites and educational programs. The single action that will have the most significant impact on increasing water conservation in the Okanagan Basin is reducing discretionary water use for landscaping. The current Friends’ board and staff are committed to making water conservation a top priority. Our demonstration sites will incorporate innovative solutions to measure and reduce water use and enchance habitat and increase biodiversity. Our outreach will involve residents, community leaders, volunteers and students in applied science activities designed to inform their environmental stewardship. The project will act as an agent of change for sustainable water conservation landscaping and is intended to increase adoption of ecologically based landscaping practices in the region through demonstration, education and strengthening community partnerships.
$10,000.00
2013

Best Practices for Sustainable Water Conservation Landscaping in the Okanagan

The Summerland Ornamental Gardens are located on a 6 hectare site of national horticultural significance with extensive botanical collections of native & introduced ornamental plants set within a unique dry ecosystem. The Project will introduce & demonstrate leading edge water conservation practices & technologies and will mobilize the community by creating a water stewardship team to raise awareness of sustainable water conservation landscaping. This Project will have two main parts: • introduction & demonstration of ecological science based practices & technologies in the planning, design & management of xeric or dry landscapes • education about these practices for the general public as well as public and private sector targeted groups, together with measurement of the impacts of adoption of such practices The Friends are uniquely positioned with partners in local and regional government, educational institutions and the media, and expert advisors in water management and ecological science to lead water conservation landscaping using this major horticultural resource.
$10,000.00
2012

Gitga'at First Nation

"We monitor by living here": The Gitga'at Environmental Knowledge Project

In a time of rapid social and environmental change, the Gitga’at First Nation seeks to draw on the local and traditional knowledge of its elders and harvesters to provide a more holistic understanding of the natural word. By documenting observations and knowledge of active harvesters during seasonal harvest rounds, the Gitga’at will create a Knowledge Bank that will be drawn upon to inform holistic resource stewardship and rapid climate change adaptation, while also bolstering intergenerational traditional knowledge transmission and empowering community members to continue their sacred relationship with their territory through active stewardship.
$10,000.00
2017

Grasslands Conservation Council of British Columbia

Private Land Protection - Exploring Options

The "Private Land Protection - Exploring Options" project seeks to explore an expanded role for the Grasslands Conservation Council of British Columbia (GCC) relating to the protection and conservation of priority grasslands across British Columbia. While grasslands represent only 1% of the provincial land base they provide habitat for over 30% of the province's species at risk. GCC would like to enhance its role around protection and conservation of critical habitats for species at risk on private land. We see a possible niche for using conservation covenants on agricultural lands that will enhance both biodiversity conservation and the economic vitality of agricultural producers.
$9,200.00
2017

Haisla Nation

Nanakila Guardian Watchmen

Nanakila was incorporated as a non-profit society on June 28, 2011. Part of the mission to, 'Conserve and restore all resources in Haisla and surrounding territory' is achieved through our Guardian Watchman program. Nanakila is a Haisla word meaning 'to stand guard over', Nanakila watchmen patrol the region stretching from the Kitamaat Valley in the north to the Kitlope Valley in the south - a total area of 13000 square kilometers. Haisla Territory includes pristine watersheds - Kiltope, Kowesas and Gilttoyees as well as some of the most heavily altered watersheds in British Columbia. In 1994 The Kitlope Heritage Conservancy with Provincial Park status was created and through an agreement with Kitamaat Village Council and BC Parks, Nanakila created the Watchman Program to manage the Conservancy. The agreement with BC Parks now encompasses patrols within the Haisla Territory including: Kitimat River Park, Wedeene Park, Coste Rocks, Kildala, Gilttoyees, Jesse Falls, Eagle Bay, Crab river, Shearwater, Klekane, Bishop Bay, Brim river, Sue Channel, and Kitlope Heritage Conservancy
$10,000.00
2011

Heritage BC

Climate Rehabilitation of Heritage Buildings

Our goal is to facilitate investments in the conservation of non residential heritage properties through measures that connect the retention of heritage values with green rehabilitation, improved energy affordability and protection from hazards related to climate change and other risks, such as earthquakes. Opportunities for climate change mitigation include green rehabilitation efforts to improve energy efficiency and smart fuel choices that would help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, with the added value of reducing operational costs for property owners, building tenants, and developers. Opportunities for climate change adaptation through the protection of heritage property from existing and future potential environmental hazards range from resilience to extreme weather events to seismic upgrades. We are collaborating with RDH Building Engineering to develop proposals for various levels of gov't &provincial utilities to place incentive funds in the Heritage Legacy Fund.Heritage BC would distribute to churches, non profits, museums, first nations,etc for energy efficiency upgrades of heritage buildings. RDH will assist in providing program design recommendations to advance the sustainability and durability of heritage properties through the Heritage Legacy Fund, in a manner that leverages other funding opportunities such as utility demand-side measures (DSM) through BC Hydro and FortisBC, emerging funding opportunities in carbon offsets and local government incentives.
$5,385.00
2015

Nature Conservancy of Canada

Blue Carbon: Creating a Climate Change Solution

The role played by marine ecosystems in carbon sequestration (blue carbon) has been largely overlooked in the study of climate change. Currently, on average, between 2-7% of blue carbon sinks are lost annually worldwide. Coastal areas in BC are under ever-increasing pressure from human use. This project will begin to create an institutional body of knowledge about how much carbon is being sequestered in coastal ecosystems, with an emphasis on eel grass and estuary ecosystems.
$10,000.00
2010

Nature Trust of British Columbia

KCP Landowner Outreach Program

In 2015 the Kootenay Conservation Program (KCP) worked with both it's West Kootenay and East Kootenay Stewardship Committees (55 partner organizations) to discuss KCP's role in Landowner Outreach in the Kootenay Region. The Committees identified the need to increase regional support for Landowner Outreach and addressed the need to develop a comprehensive plan for 2017/2018 to deliver: 1) a web-based landowner Stewardship Resource Centre 2) KCP landowner outreach support to partner organizations (i.e. conference/workshops, landowner resource guide, etc) In order to develop a comprehensive plan, KCP will host two 1 day facilitated workshops with both the East and West Kootenay Stewardship Committees to determine the goals for a Landowner Stewardship Resource Centre and how KCP can provide support to it's partner organizations. KCP will provide extensive background information and resources to the committees prior to the workshops and will compile the results of the workshops to create a comprehensive plan for 2017/2018.
$4,500.00
2016

Ocean Wise Conservation Association

Ocean Plastics Initiative

The Ocean Plastics Initiative (OPI) will challenge the perception that it is ok to produce, use and dispose of large quantities of plastics that end up in our oceans. Leveraging Ocean Wise’s experience and expertise in ocean plastic research and solutions, OPI will build a network of organizations and businesses committed to reducing their plastic use. The network will provide space for innovation, identifying and addressing common challenges to reducing plastic use, and creating solutions to apply across businesses and sectors. Ultimately, OPI will help normalize plastic-free business practices, hastening the shift to less plastic entering and persisting in the ocean.
$10,000.00
2017

Outdoor Recreation Council of B.C.

Healthy Forests - Healthy Communities

Healthy Forests - Healthy Communities is an initiative to engage a wide range of stakeholders from across the Province in a conversation about the long-term health and vitality of the forest sector. The series will include professional foresters, conservationists, environmentalists, First Nations, business, academic and community members.
$10,000.00
2011

Pacific Parklands Foundation

Restoration of Guichon Creek - Bioswale Building & Bank Restoration

Guichon Creek, situated on the BCIT campus, has been undergoing restoration work by the BCIT Fish, Wildlife, and Recreation program and the Rivers Institute. Catching the Spirit youth will work with these organizations on the restoration efforts, in particular, work on the interception of sediment and urban runoff pollution that is currently affecting the health of the creek; home to both cutthroat trout and coho salmon. This hands-on project is an opportunity for youth to help restore the creek and its habitat. The project includes the building of a bioswale, a native vegetated drainage ditch that catches and filters sediment and pollutants from urban runoff, providing cleaner less polluted water for the creek. The banks of the creek will be restored through removal of invasive species and planting of native species to improve the creeks biodiversity. Fence building along the creek's riparian area will help delineate the sensitive area of the creek. CtS Youth will learn planning, leadership and restoration techniques important for the stewardship of fish and wildlife habitat.
$2,500.00
2012

Pembina Foundation for Environmental Research and Education

Social Housing Revitalization Pilot

The Pembina Institute is working with BC Housing, the BC Non-Profit Housing Association, construction and manufacturing companies, and non-profit partners to adapt and pilot the Energiesprong retrofit approach in B.C. The project will evaluate the potential to aggregate social housing and work towards creating the first competitive request for proposals for energy efficiency retrofits of multi tenant buildings in BC. This approach rethinks the conventional resource flows of green building initiatives by focusing benefits on low-income and marginalized communities while incentivizing industry to invest in research and development to deliver low-cost technologies and new delivery models.
$10,000.00
2017

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Creating a vision for salmon in the lower Fraser River

We will approach individuals, groups, First Nations, academics, business and municipalities who understand the landscape (ecologically and politically), and can identify the geographical and political focus required for the lower river and estuary to be a vibrant region that sustain salmon, people and local economies 30-50 years from now. Creating the document will bring disconnected groups together to share ideas and identify solutions to systemic issues including: Resources – Federal government budget and resource cuts to DFO have affected science, enforcement, habitat protection and knowledge transfer at all levels. First Nations, community groups and ENGOS are left to deal with this void. Authority – More progressive Fraser River co-coordinating bodies have been dissolved. In their place, agencies like Port Metro Vancouver now drive political and economic agendas. With legislation weakened, governing bodies removed and replaced, and policy mandates like Wild Salmon Policy unimplemented, serious losses to salmon habitat are occurring. Community groups, First Nations and municipalities cannot respond adequately. Fragmentation – There is no broad coordination around conservation planning in the lower Fraser and regional collaboration is required. Beliefs –There is a mind set that environmental protection is a choice between the economy and the environment. The opportunity to envision Salmon in the Fraser in 2050 is not yet realised.
$10,000.00
2015

RAVEN (RESPECTING ABORIGINAL VALUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL NEEDS)

Environmental Racism Education Development Project

At a recent strategic planning session, board and staff decided to move forward with the education element of our mission. With this development grant, we will explore ways to implement the second half of the mandate outlined in our Letters Patent “...to assist aboriginal peoples in protecting and restoring the natural environment for the benefit of all people within Canada by …developing and delivering education programs to advance knowledge and understanding of available legal rights and remedies.” The development project will consist of two steps: Step 1) Educate ourselves: train staff and board about the Canadian legal system regarding injunctions, judicial reviews, appeals court processes, etc; and learn from First Nations about their systems of ‘ancestral laws’; Step 2) Engage our First Nations partners in a collaborative learning process to outline a new education program that will help us meet our mandate, including: what information the curriculum needs to cover, how could the curriculum be most effectively delivered, does the proposed program meet CRA's criteria for "advancement of education". The Vancouver Foundation’s support will be used to fund Step 2. It will help move this project forward by providing funding for us to collaborate with our Indigenous partners and explore ways in which we can meet our mandate, and provide them with a service they can use to help advance their struggle for recognition of their indigenous rights and title in the courts.
$10,000.00
2015

Regional District of Central Kootenay

Kootenay Lake Shoreline Management Guidelines

The Kootenay Lake Partnership is producing shoreline management guidelines. Both the guidelines (captured in a document) and the process to arrive at them, are important components to changing how it is that shoreline impacts are managed, mitigated, or compensated for. The KLP has been working toward management guidelines for some time – ecological inventories, archaeological studies, GIS mapping etc. – and only recently has the KLP approached the shoreline management guidelines as the beginning, not the end. The development project is the completion (integration and production) and public outreach of the shoreline management guidelines. To do this now requires assembling the datasets from all the individual studies that were completed for the lake. Integrating these means creating an index of various parts of the shoreline using a 5 category system of very high to very low ‘overall’ value. This will form the basis of directing activities by decision makers. The production component will entail the visuals, text and mapping of the datasets in a coherent way. The process that is important here is assembling the ‘partners’ which are signatory to the KLP and creating a streamlined approach to service delivery, compliance and enforcement, legislative changes, and public outreach.
$10,000.00
2015

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