Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Allan Brooks Nature Centre Society

Improving Okanagan Habitat Connectivity "Going from here to there"

Improving Okanagan Habitat Connectivity 'How do we get from here to there' is an educational outreach initiative that will provide the tools to understand and take action on the results and recommendations from the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy project and also to help the general public to understand why connected ecosystems and wildlife habitat corridors are an essential part of maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Okanagan region. Both the SOSCP and the OCCP are working on a Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for the Okanagan region. The strategy promotes a “big-picture” landscape view of the region and provides a framework for considering conservation options for entire ecosystems and watersheds that go beyond municipal or rural boundaries and includes all land-tenures. The project that we are presenting here forms part of the implementation of the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy.
$20,000.00
2014

Biodiversity Conservation Strategy (BCS) for the Okanagan Basin

To complete a biodiversity conservation strategy for the north and central Okanagan that will identify, preserve and restore important natural areas. It will provide a road map for coordinated efforts to manage land and water of ecological value and provide a template for land use decision-making for public agencies, local governments and conservation groups.
$17,400.00
2010

Animals in Science Policy Institute

Replacing animals in secondary school science education

A switch to non-animal methods in education is important for animal welfare, education, and student empowerment. This project aims to understand the cultural shift in secondary teaching required so that non-animal alternatives for dissection are more readily adopted. We plan to: 1) survey BC teachers to assess their perspectives on dissection, and identify obstacles to and opportunities for the adoption of non-animal alternatives; 2) poll the BC public to assess their views on dissection; and 3) hold an expert panel event that will bring together international experts on the issue of non-animal alternatives for dissection to identify novel strategies for creating cultural change in teaching
$10,000.00
2017

Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources

Indigenous Watershed Initiatives and Co-Governance Arrangements:A British Columbia Systematic Review

CIER and the BC First Nations Fisheries Council (FNFC) are partnering to undertake a systematic review of indigenous watershed initiatives and co-governance arrangements to contribute to shaping the future of watershed planning and a new watershed governance regime in BC. As CIER and FNFC both work with First Nations, this idea originated from a conversation to understand and build BCFN capacity around watershed planning initiatives and co-governance arrangements. First Nations can play a critical role in the protection of water for fish and healthy aquatic ecosystems. The BC Water Sustainability Act (2014) has created an opportunity for watershed co-governance regime between the BC Government and BCFNs with their respective neighbours. This project serves to inform existing and future co-governance discussions by providing an accurate picture of the current needs and opportunities for BCFNs to advance a co-governance discussion with the Province and local governments. The FNFC intends to use this project to help build capacity for informed water decision-making among BCFNs to protect water for fish and healthy aquatic ecosystems. Through a series of activities, this initiative will identify BCFNs that are well placed and/or already interested in pursuing watershed planning and/or participating in co-governance discussions to share experiences, continue or start building relationships and/or further explore possible solutions/models for BC co-governance arrangements.
$11,250.00
2015

Our Water - Our Future

The project, “Our Water – Our Future”: First Nation Youth Water Leaders Creating Change is a 2 year program to empower and enable Indigenous youth to assume positions of leadership on water issues by providing them with the tools to protect water, supporting them with access to network of existing dynamic, prominent water leaders, and inspiring them with water learning experiences. 16 you the from a First Nations in each of the 4 main watersheds of Canada (Pacific, Arctic, Atlantic and Hudson Bay) have been chosen. Each community will host a week-long water leadership training workshop. During and between the workshops, youth will design and implement (with CIER help) and share personal action plans to address local water challenges. We are seeking a Vancouver Foundation Community Grant to support our Pacific watershed workshop (workshop #2). The workshop will be located on the Similkameen River in Keremeos, BC and will involve understanding and exploring water issues that affect the Similkameen, Okanagan, and Columbia rivers and, ultimately the health of the Pacific watershed.
$20,000.00
2013

Cetus Research & Conservation Society

Southern Vancouver Island Derelict Fishing Gear Removal Project

Derelict fishing gear has an unseen and devastating impact on the marine environment. Since 2002 the Northwest Straits Initiative's Derelict Fishing Gear Program, in Washington state, has removed over 4,000 ghost nets and 2,500 derelict crab pots from Puget Sound. In 2011 the Province of BC removed/disabled derelict crab pots and a seine net from North Pender Island, with a reported 1,799 dead and alive animals recovered. On the southern BC coast, there is currently no ongoing program to remove derelict fishing gear. Cetus Research and Conservation Society would like to become a leader for this work in southern BC waters, working with engaged participants - from fishermen to divers to beachgoers and citizen scientists. Living Oceans Society is developing a project to remove and safely dispose of derelict gear in northern Vancouver Island waters. Cetus will collaborate with Living Oceans Society to share the results of our research, our experiences and lessons learned, resulting in a cohesive approach to derelict fishing gear removal in the waters around Vancouver Island.
$15,000.00
2012

David Suzuki Foundation

Charged Up: Accelerating Community-led Renewable Energy in BC

The conversation around climate change tends to leave individuals and communities feeling overwhelmed, powerless and full of anxiety. It often seems there is little we can do at the local level, and that what governments are doing is just not enough. Small-scale, community owned energy projects can empower communities to be part of positive, meaningful efforts to combat climate change through shared action. The Charged Up campaign will showcase community success stories, convene and train community leaders, and build a clean energy community who can support one another in addressing the technical, financial, and regulatory issues that come with clean energy projects.
$10,000.00
2017

Earthwise Society

Feed the Bees Planting Program

The Feed the Bees Planting Program addresses root causes of pollinator decline by engaging widespread community action to plant "bee friendly" gardens at homes, schools, businesses and boulevards. The gardens will be mapped on-line to show how individual plantings collectively start to create habitat corridors, reducing habitat fragmentation and assisting in the movement of pollinator populations within urban areas. The Earthwise Garden is a learning resource for the project, demonstrating how ecological plantings of diverse flowering species enhance biodiversity. These concepts will be applied on a community wide scale to replace natural vegetation lost through development. Supporting the widespread adoption of specific planting programs that provide flowers over a long season helps to meet the habitat needs of pollinators. By engaging residents living in urban areas to help address a problem that impacts farming, the project creates greater awareness of how we are all interconnected and how individual actions can impact regional biodiversity and ecological health.
$20,000.00
2012

Ecotrust Canada

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations

Green Building with Clayoquot Sound First Nations
$10,000.00
2011

Green and Culturally Appropriate Building for Clayoquot First Nations

To design a green housing plan for First Nations communities in Clayoquot Sound which will use local materials and labour, be well-suited to the climate and affordable to build, maintain and heat. The project will produce designs incorporating green building options and culturally appropriate building elements for each community accompanied by a financial plan to enable them to actually be built.
$20,000.00
2010

Environmental Youth Alliance

Inner-Nature: Developing a Connected Schoolyard Greening Project

THE SOIL - We will work with at least 3 classes at each of: 2 secondary & 1 elementary schools in Vancouver to pilot innovative, experiential learning in schoolyard green spaces. Our aim will be to find ways to engage students and teachers in learning about urban wildlife and creating schoolyard gardens to house a diversity of wild creatures. These programs will combine wildlife and food garden creation with citizen science programming. Our goal in the development phase of this project is to learn with youth & educators how schools can create and USE biodiverse natural spaces on their grounds. THE SCHOOL INSTITUTION - We will meet quarterly with: youth, administrators at each school, coordinators of Community School Teams, the VSB Sustainability Department, Youth Workers in the SACY program, community partners, and local alternate schools to discuss approaches for creating regular, sustainable nature access for vulnerable students. Together we will draft a template Memorandum of Understanding that the EYA can use as a framework to guide our partnerships with VSB schools and Community Hubs in the future. OUR FRIENDS IN THE VSFN - We will continue to meet with these partners to update them on our work with the school institution, and will seek to include multiple organizations from the VSFN in our work. Together we will set common goals, learn how to effectively collaborate and develop a shared narrative that we can use to broadly communicate our work.
$10,000.00
2015

The Nectar Trail

Work by local ecologists has shown that corridors connecting habitat islands can lead to large population increases for local pollinators. To this end, we will work with the community to implement a demonstration habitat corridor that links existing pollinator-friendly parks. By supporting local residents to maintain 1000s of pollinator plants and structures along these routes, we will create habitat-rich sites in which bees, butterflies, and birds can thrive. Partnering with the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Park Board, residents, schools, and businesses, the Nectar Trail will link conservation, land use, health, and food, providing a forum for the people of Vancouver to examine urban ecological interdependencies. The project will be created along the newly established Ridgeway Greenway in the section between Vandusen Garden and Queen Elizabeth Park. Connecting the parks with several large pollinator gardens accompanied with onsite interpretive media and environmental art, our demonstration 'Nectar Trail' creates a new model of urban restoration and a unique amenity for Vancouver.
$20,000.00
2013

Evergreen

Uncover Still Creek

Through the “Uncover Still Creek” program, Evergreen will work with the City of Vancouver to rehabilitate priority municipal lands into spaces that welcome community members to spend time, provide vital habitat for terrestrial and aquatic species and mitigate high stormwater flows and poor water quality. The program aims to connect citizens with their watershed, encouraging them to take action both locally and as a community to ensure the health of Still Creek’s waters.
$15,000.00
2011

Farm Folk / City Folk

Don't Pocket the Potatoes: Addressing Community Garden Theft in Richmond

While Richmond Food Security Society officially manages the community garden program, we work closely with a wide range of stakeholders. While each stakeholder has shared ideas on how to address the issue of community garden theft, we have yet to form an official project team to address this thoroughly and would like to do so. What we would like to do is form a project team who will work together to research possible solutions. This will include a detailed scan of best practices in other communities, resulting in a detailed webpage where Richmond Community gardeners can learn from. We would also like to conduct a survey of gardeners, in at least 3 languages to find out their personal experience with theft and their ideas to address it. This will provide gardeners with a necessary outlet for their concerns. We would also like to compare the thefts from 2015 to physical site characteristics to determine which physical features may deter thefts. We have only been tracking garden theft data for one year, and would like to track it again in 2016 in order to get a better understanding of the scope of this problem. While we only have data for one year, we have anecdotal and media evidence (through articles in the Richmond review dating back to 2013) that this problem is ongoing.
$10,000.00
2015

Fraser River Discovery Centre Society

FRDC's Outdoor Interpretive Panels

IIn the 1990s, the Fraser River Discovery Centre (FRDC) created a series of 22 visually exciting and thoughtprovoking interpretive panels which were displayed along a 1.3km riverfront boardwalk. The panels heighten awareness of environmental issues related to the Fraser River watershed; stimulate river advocacy and interpretation; and encourage community participation by fostering a stronger understanding, ownership and desire to act positively to affect the river's health. This project would replace damaged panels in September 2012 with updated design and information to coincide with Artists on the River, the FRDC’s annual festival celebrating Rivers Day.
$10,000.00
2011

Fraser Riverkeeper Society

Stand Up for Pacific Salmon Animation

The project will create a visually compelling animation to educate the public about the problem of net-pen salmon fish farms and their impact on the aquatic environment, human health and wild salmon stocks. It will show consumers how to help shift global salmon farming to a more positive economic and ecological operation: closed-containment or tank system, aquaculture. The project is part of a larger campaign that educates consumers on the risks posed to wild salmon by net-pen farms, and facilitates citizen engagement with retailers.
$20,000.00
2010

Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition

RESTORING WATERWAYS THROUGH HANDS ON ACTIONS, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION

Our proposed project will improve both Luckacuck Creek, Stewart Creek, and off-channel habitats in the Chilliwack River watershed through enhancing and restoring riparian and aquatic habitats along these watercourses. Coupled with these “shovels-in-the-ground” tree plantings and restoration activities, we will work with the landowners and the community to raise awareness and appreciation for the importance of watershed health. This will include community participation at planting events, and the promotion for the importance of stewarding local waterways. We will provide opportunities for community members to be involved in collecting, analyzing and understanding data on stream health. It is paramount to foster a sense of place, and care for waterways, wildlife and habitat especially during changing land-uses and increasing populations.
$20,000.00
2014

Friends Of The Summerland Research Station Gardens

Innovative Landscaping for Water Conservation

Building on the momentum and success of our pilot project, the Friends are requesting assistance with this new phase of our water conservation program as it relates to our community outreach, water conservation survey, demonstration sites and educational programs. The single action that will have the most significant impact on increasing water conservation in the Okanagan Basin is reducing discretionary water use for landscaping. The current Friends’ board and staff are committed to making water conservation a top priority. Our demonstration sites will incorporate innovative solutions to measure and reduce water use and enchance habitat and increase biodiversity. Our outreach will involve residents, community leaders, volunteers and students in applied science activities designed to inform their environmental stewardship. The project will act as an agent of change for sustainable water conservation landscaping and is intended to increase adoption of ecologically based landscaping practices in the region through demonstration, education and strengthening community partnerships.
$10,000.00
2013

Best Practices for Sustainable Water Conservation Landscaping in the Okanagan

The Summerland Ornamental Gardens are located on a 6 hectare site of national horticultural significance with extensive botanical collections of native & introduced ornamental plants set within a unique dry ecosystem. The Project will introduce & demonstrate leading edge water conservation practices & technologies and will mobilize the community by creating a water stewardship team to raise awareness of sustainable water conservation landscaping. This Project will have two main parts: • introduction & demonstration of ecological science based practices & technologies in the planning, design & management of xeric or dry landscapes • education about these practices for the general public as well as public and private sector targeted groups, together with measurement of the impacts of adoption of such practices The Friends are uniquely positioned with partners in local and regional government, educational institutions and the media, and expert advisors in water management and ecological science to lead water conservation landscaping using this major horticultural resource.
$10,000.00
2012

Galiano Conservancy Association

Living Landscapes: Restoring Place, Connecting People Project

The project will implement ecological restoration treatments and conduct restoration planning on Galiano Island with a strong educational and community engagement focus. The project will take place on DL 57, a parcel that was recently acquired by the Galiano Conservancy and is recognized regionally for its high conservation value. The 76 Ha. property supports a diversity of healthy, intact ecosystems and has a history of agriculture, small scale forestry and residential use. The vision for the property includes the creation of the Galiano Learning Centre to provide a venue for multi-day experiential education programs along with long-term research and innovation focused on restoration and sustainable living. The Conservancy has assembled a team of experienced partners and professionals, students and community volunteers to initiate the restoration of a portable mill site, helping to create a thriving forest ecosystem out of hard-packed earth. Our team will also develop a property level restoration plan that is crafted to provide long-term educational and research opportunities.
$20,000.00
2013

Georgia Strait Alliance

Amplifying Community Voices - Stop Expansion of Tanker Traffic in Georgia Strait

The Georgia Strait region is faced with a serious threat from Kinder Morgan's proposal to build a second pipeline along the TransMountain route to carry diluted bitumen from the Alberta tar sands to the Lower Mainland and the corresponding increase in tanker traffic transporting it to refineries in Asia and the US. The public, local governments, other conservation groups and our own members have expressed their concern over the proposed expansion and the accompanying increased risk of an oil spill. GSA is taking a leadership role in helping to coordinate the efforts of organizations working to stop the pipeline expansion and ensuring the public is informed about Kinder Morgan's plans, the associated risks, and what individual citizens can do to raise their concerns through the complicated consultation processes. GSA will also build on our existing relationships to serve as a link between governments, the shipping industry and environmentalists and ensure that the real costs of an increase in tanker traffic and decisive action to reduce the risks are considered.
$20,000.00
2012

Gitga'at First Nation

"We monitor by living here": The Gitga'at Environmental Knowledge Project

In a time of rapid social and environmental change, the Gitga’at First Nation seeks to draw on the local and traditional knowledge of its elders and harvesters to provide a more holistic understanding of the natural word. By documenting observations and knowledge of active harvesters during seasonal harvest rounds, the Gitga’at will create a Knowledge Bank that will be drawn upon to inform holistic resource stewardship and rapid climate change adaptation, while also bolstering intergenerational traditional knowledge transmission and empowering community members to continue their sacred relationship with their territory through active stewardship.
$10,000.00
2017

GOERT

Engaging Communities in Bluebird Stewardship

This project will build a framework for community involvement through participation, training, and outreach in the Western Bluebird Reintroduction Program. We are re-establishing this locally extinct population through a series of translocations over 5 years, and by installing nestboxes to replace this critical missing habitat element. The population’s long-term viability will largely depend on fostering community support and volunteer action, because most remaining Garry oak habitats are on private property. A highlight of this project is recruiting bluebird volunteers and providing them with formal training at ‘Bluebird Field School’, allowing them to participate in crucial activities: building & monitoring nestboxes; monitoring & reporting nestbox activity; surveying for birds; and improving habitat quality to support biodiversity conservation. This project will develop a comprehensive community outreach program for the final 2 years of translocations, to ensure continued habitat suitability and to serve as a model for other communities re-building populations of rare species.
$15,000.00
2013

Haisla Nation

Nanakila Guardian Watchmen

Nanakila was incorporated as a non-profit society on June 28, 2011. Part of the mission to, 'Conserve and restore all resources in Haisla and surrounding territory' is achieved through our Guardian Watchman program. Nanakila is a Haisla word meaning 'to stand guard over', Nanakila watchmen patrol the region stretching from the Kitamaat Valley in the north to the Kitlope Valley in the south - a total area of 13000 square kilometers. Haisla Territory includes pristine watersheds - Kiltope, Kowesas and Gilttoyees as well as some of the most heavily altered watersheds in British Columbia. In 1994 The Kitlope Heritage Conservancy with Provincial Park status was created and through an agreement with Kitamaat Village Council and BC Parks, Nanakila created the Watchman Program to manage the Conservancy. The agreement with BC Parks now encompasses patrols within the Haisla Territory including: Kitimat River Park, Wedeene Park, Coste Rocks, Kildala, Gilttoyees, Jesse Falls, Eagle Bay, Crab river, Shearwater, Klekane, Bishop Bay, Brim river, Sue Channel, and Kitlope Heritage Conservancy
$10,000.00
2011

Kingfisher Environmental Interpretive Centre Society

Debris Flood Restoration

The Kingfisher Interpretive Centre incurred heavy damage by a catastrophic debris flood that roared down Cooke Creek on May 2nd, 2014. The damage to the site and our salmon hatchery is devastating but not insurmountable. We are working hard at re-establishing our ability to raise salmon and educate today's youth. We have major repairs to undertake including building an appropriate protective structure (berm in Cooke Creek), certified by an engineer, in order to regain our regular occupancy. We would like to have the new berm built and the majority of repairs (including re-establishing our compromised water sources) completed before the next Spring freshet (May) so that we will be allowed to use the site for raising our beloved salmon and educating local school children. We would also like to rebuild our internationally acclaimed watershed model that was completely destroyed by the flood and replace our lost inventory. We would like to request assistance from the Vancouver Foundation to aid us in our recovery and help us rebuild and recover our lost materials.
$15,000.00
2014

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