Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Allan Brooks Nature Centre Society

Improving Okanagan Habitat Connectivity "Going from here to there"

Improving Okanagan Habitat Connectivity 'How do we get from here to there' is an educational outreach initiative that will provide the tools to understand and take action on the results and recommendations from the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy project and also to help the general public to understand why connected ecosystems and wildlife habitat corridors are an essential part of maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Okanagan region. Both the SOSCP and the OCCP are working on a Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for the Okanagan region. The strategy promotes a “big-picture” landscape view of the region and provides a framework for considering conservation options for entire ecosystems and watersheds that go beyond municipal or rural boundaries and includes all land-tenures. The project that we are presenting here forms part of the implementation of the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy.
$20,000.00
2014

Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources

Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe Watershed Planning Readiness Assessment

The Chilliwack River Watershed is home to the Ts’elxweyeqw Tribe (TT), who are Stó:lō: 'People of the River”. They have stewarded this area since time immemorial; this intimate connection is reflected in its name: ‘Chilliwack’ is the anglicised version of Ts’elxweyeqw. In partnership with CIER and The WaterWealth Project, the TT are seeking funds for a Watershed Planning Readiness Assessment, which is the critical first phase of an indigenous-led Watershed Plan. The Readiness Assessment will confirm community interest in watershed planning, identify key gaps and needs in community capacity, and build essential knowledge and understanding of the planning process. The results of the first phase are required to move forward with the second phase of developing a Watershed Plan as it will identify an appropriate process and determine scope. A Ts’elxweyeqw Watershed Plan could involve indigenous and non-indigenous partners and will be driven by/interwoven with indigenous values, approaches and knowledge.
$30,000.00
2014

Our Water - Our Future

The project, “Our Water – Our Future”: First Nation Youth Water Leaders Creating Change is a 2 year program to empower and enable Indigenous youth to assume positions of leadership on water issues by providing them with the tools to protect water, supporting them with access to network of existing dynamic, prominent water leaders, and inspiring them with water learning experiences. 16 you the from a First Nations in each of the 4 main watersheds of Canada (Pacific, Arctic, Atlantic and Hudson Bay) have been chosen. Each community will host a week-long water leadership training workshop. During and between the workshops, youth will design and implement (with CIER help) and share personal action plans to address local water challenges. We are seeking a Vancouver Foundation Community Grant to support our Pacific watershed workshop (workshop #2). The workshop will be located on the Similkameen River in Keremeos, BC and will involve understanding and exploring water issues that affect the Similkameen, Okanagan, and Columbia rivers and, ultimately the health of the Pacific watershed.
$20,000.00
2013

Comox Valley Project Watershed Society

Protecting and Restoring the Courtenay River Estuary

The Estuary Working Group (EWG), representing 13 environmental organisations is currently working on eelgrass and habitat restoration, carbon sequestration research, a National Historic Status bid, and yearly awareness campaigns. The EWG has participated with the Comox Valley Regional District in revising a Courtenay River Estuary Management Plan, originally created in 2000 but never implemented. The revised plan needs the support of local municipalities. They were invited to take part in revising the plan but declined to do so. We propose to create an interactive animated 3D map of the estuary to illustrate changes over time, the problems that need to be addressed and present various scenarios for resolving these challenges. The complexity and interconnectedness of the estuary’s ecosystems, examples of economic development compatible with a healthy functioning estuary, and potential social and recreational benefits will be highlighted. In creating the map we intend to engage local officials, planners, and other stakeholders in data gathering and visioning a desired future estuary.
$30,000.00
2012

Cowichan Community Land Trust Society

The Great Big Bee Garden Challenge

This project begins to restore areas of networked native bee habitat by planting significant areas of a broad range of nectar and pollen producing native plant species, heritage herbaceous perennials and cover crop forages in a number of connected areas. Many of these are species are traditional first peoples food plants that have been pollinated by our 200 species of native bee pollinators for 10,000's of years and thus a key to sustained food security for coastal first peoples. These plants provide realistic quantities of nectar and pollen for native pollinators and restores a very necessary biodiversity in order to meet the nutritional requirements of pollinators for sustained enhanced immune response to current and future environmental stressors. We are organized to accomplish this through timely community education, participation and engagement of all age groups in diverse venues in both urban and rural landscapes in the Cowichan Valley following the guidelines and coaching from organizations such as the very successful Xerces Society of Invertebrate Conservation.
$25,344.00
2013

Friends of Cowichan Creeks Project

The Friends of Cowichan Creeks Project will initiate streamkeeping and ecological restoration efforts on six urban creeks in the Cowichan Valley. Consultants from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans will help prescribe restoration plans, and the organization will implement these plans with the help of volunteers. They will also offer four Streamkeeper courses and two riparian restoration workshops for members of the public.
$30,000.00
2010

Earthwise Society

Feed the Bees Planting Program

The Feed the Bees Planting Program addresses root causes of pollinator decline by engaging widespread community action to plant "bee friendly" gardens at homes, schools, businesses and boulevards. The gardens will be mapped on-line to show how individual plantings collectively start to create habitat corridors, reducing habitat fragmentation and assisting in the movement of pollinator populations within urban areas. The Earthwise Garden is a learning resource for the project, demonstrating how ecological plantings of diverse flowering species enhance biodiversity. These concepts will be applied on a community wide scale to replace natural vegetation lost through development. Supporting the widespread adoption of specific planting programs that provide flowers over a long season helps to meet the habitat needs of pollinators. By engaging residents living in urban areas to help address a problem that impacts farming, the project creates greater awareness of how we are all interconnected and how individual actions can impact regional biodiversity and ecological health.
$20,000.00
2012

Ecotrust Canada

Green and Culturally Appropriate Building for Clayoquot First Nations

To design a green housing plan for First Nations communities in Clayoquot Sound which will use local materials and labour, be well-suited to the climate and affordable to build, maintain and heat. The project will produce designs incorporating green building options and culturally appropriate building elements for each community accompanied by a financial plan to enable them to actually be built.
$20,000.00
2010

Environmental Defence Canada

Freshwater and habitat protection through the Blue Flag program

In 2014, we are looking forward to celebrating BC's first ever Blue Flag beach in the community of Harrison Hot Springs. Having qualified as a Blue Flag candidate in August 2011, Harrison Hot Spring's town council voted to certify for the stringent 32 criteria under the international Blue Flag program. We would like to help them attain this prized eco-label, internationally awarded to the world's cleanest, safest beaches and marinas. We are also excited to celebrate BC's first ever Blue Flag beach, and inspire others to protect their aquatic ecosystems. As Harrison Hot Springs' candidacy has attracted local attention, we have since been approached by other BC municipalities about our program. Over the next 3 years, we will invite 15 municipalities to join our Blue Flag program, and walk them through the process by which they can protect their important freshwater resources, while celebrating their communities' environmental commitments. Some of these other freshwater bodies are Shuswap, Okanagan and Cultus Lakes, in addition to many other popular freshwater BC beaches.
$25,000.00
2013

Environmental Youth Alliance

The Nectar Trail

Work by local ecologists has shown that corridors connecting habitat islands can lead to large population increases for local pollinators. To this end, we will work with the community to implement a demonstration habitat corridor that links existing pollinator-friendly parks. By supporting local residents to maintain 1000s of pollinator plants and structures along these routes, we will create habitat-rich sites in which bees, butterflies, and birds can thrive. Partnering with the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Park Board, residents, schools, and businesses, the Nectar Trail will link conservation, land use, health, and food, providing a forum for the people of Vancouver to examine urban ecological interdependencies. The project will be created along the newly established Ridgeway Greenway in the section between Vandusen Garden and Queen Elizabeth Park. Connecting the parks with several large pollinator gardens accompanied with onsite interpretive media and environmental art, our demonstration 'Nectar Trail' creates a new model of urban restoration and a unique amenity for Vancouver.
$20,000.00
2013

Farm Folk / City Folk

The Smart Farm Project - Phase 2

The Smart Farm Project proposes adapting smart growth principles to small farm acreages outside the Agricultural Land Reserve in rural communities to catalyze new farms across BC. With a combination of low footprint design, progressive local planning, non-profit or public oversight, social investment and farming know-how, the Smart Farm Project leverages increased density to create affordable homes and farming opportunities, boost agriculture production and generate more jobs for the local economy at the same time. In 2013, a group of stakeholders completed Phase 1 of The Smart Farm Project-a detailed report analyzing four Smart Farm proposals on four different land holdings on the Sunshine Coast. Phase 2 of The Smart Farm Project will: 1) launch an outreach strategy to catalyze Smart Farm proposals in multiple regions across Southern BC, 2) develop the legal and financing frameworks to ensure these developments are community-owned and operated, and 3) coordinate a series of forums with local government, provincial authorities, legal professionals and farm proponents to draft a development application process that support implementation of small farm co-housing developments outside the ALR.
$25,000.00
2015

Fraser Riverkeeper Society

Stand Up for Pacific Salmon Animation

The project will create a visually compelling animation to educate the public about the problem of net-pen salmon fish farms and their impact on the aquatic environment, human health and wild salmon stocks. It will show consumers how to help shift global salmon farming to a more positive economic and ecological operation: closed-containment or tank system, aquaculture. The project is part of a larger campaign that educates consumers on the risks posed to wild salmon by net-pen farms, and facilitates citizen engagement with retailers.
$20,000.00
2010

Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition

RESTORING WATERWAYS THROUGH HANDS ON ACTIONS, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION

Our proposed project will improve both Luckacuck Creek, Stewart Creek, and off-channel habitats in the Chilliwack River watershed through enhancing and restoring riparian and aquatic habitats along these watercourses. Coupled with these “shovels-in-the-ground” tree plantings and restoration activities, we will work with the landowners and the community to raise awareness and appreciation for the importance of watershed health. This will include community participation at planting events, and the promotion for the importance of stewarding local waterways. We will provide opportunities for community members to be involved in collecting, analyzing and understanding data on stream health. It is paramount to foster a sense of place, and care for waterways, wildlife and habitat especially during changing land-uses and increasing populations.
$20,000.00
2014

Restoring and Sustaining our Freshwater Resources

Restoring and Sustaining our Freshwater Resources: Creating a Culture for natural healthy communities. FVWC will work with landowners, governments, First Nations, other organizations and communities across the Fraser Valley. The focus is to create a culture around protecting and sustaining our freshwater resources. In order to do so, a number of projects benefiting the different facets of the region and diversity of people, coupled with existing and publicly accepted events, is required. In general, we plan to: -Help identify local and regional level threats to waterways and create a shared information database with a regional/watershed approach. -Monitor water quality/fish presence along key watercourses across the Fraser Valley that contain known salmon spawning, rearing and other rare species. Data will be used to help isolate areas of waterway threats and opportunities. -Host a Manure and Water workshop. -Conduct riparian habitat enhancements throughout the Fraser Valley. -Engage and share knowledge about protecting freshwater resources -Conduct habitat restoration
$30,000.00
2013

Galiano Conservancy Association

Living Landscapes: Restoring Place, Connecting People Project

The project will implement ecological restoration treatments and conduct restoration planning on Galiano Island with a strong educational and community engagement focus. The project will take place on DL 57, a parcel that was recently acquired by the Galiano Conservancy and is recognized regionally for its high conservation value. The 76 Ha. property supports a diversity of healthy, intact ecosystems and has a history of agriculture, small scale forestry and residential use. The vision for the property includes the creation of the Galiano Learning Centre to provide a venue for multi-day experiential education programs along with long-term research and innovation focused on restoration and sustainable living. The Conservancy has assembled a team of experienced partners and professionals, students and community volunteers to initiate the restoration of a portable mill site, helping to create a thriving forest ecosystem out of hard-packed earth. Our team will also develop a property level restoration plan that is crafted to provide long-term educational and research opportunities.
$20,000.00
2013

Georgia Strait Alliance

Building Local Oil Spill Resilience

This project is central to GSA’s Energy & Shipping program’s strategic objective of improving oil spill prevention and response, an urgent issue given the projected sixfold increase in tanker traffic through Georgia Strait should the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion proposal gain approval. GSA will: • Raise awareness of the impacts of an oil spill on a community • Advocate for improved local government spill prevention and response (to address the existing risk of diluted bitumen transport); • Use the absence of adequate local response capacity and plans as a strategy to raise local government concern about diluted bitumen transport (to advocate against increased transport via Kinder Morgan’s proposed expansion. The 2014 municipal elections provide an opportunity to work in a non-partisan way in a few communities with the most influencing potential, ultimately converting heightened concern about the increasing threat of an oil spill and lack of municipalities’ ability to respond into action by newly elected officials to improve spill planning and response capacity.
$22,100.00
2014

Amplifying Community Voices - Stop Expansion of Tanker Traffic in Georgia Strait

The Georgia Strait region is faced with a serious threat from Kinder Morgan's proposal to build a second pipeline along the TransMountain route to carry diluted bitumen from the Alberta tar sands to the Lower Mainland and the corresponding increase in tanker traffic transporting it to refineries in Asia and the US. The public, local governments, other conservation groups and our own members have expressed their concern over the proposed expansion and the accompanying increased risk of an oil spill. GSA is taking a leadership role in helping to coordinate the efforts of organizations working to stop the pipeline expansion and ensuring the public is informed about Kinder Morgan's plans, the associated risks, and what individual citizens can do to raise their concerns through the complicated consultation processes. GSA will also build on our existing relationships to serve as a link between governments, the shipping industry and environmentalists and ensure that the real costs of an increase in tanker traffic and decisive action to reduce the risks are considered.
$20,000.00
2012

GOERT

Bring Back the Bluebird Reintroduction Project: a symbol of environmental hope

We are working toward returning the Western Bluebird to the Georgia Basin area of BC. We have partnered with the Province of BC, the Nature Conservancy of Canada, Salt Spring Island Conservancy, Ecostudies Institute, North American Bluebird Society, Victoria Natural History Society, and the American Bird Conservancy to undertake a 5 year reintroduction program. In this 2012-2013 project, we will translocate 5-10 pairs of adult Western Bluebirds from healthy source populations in Washington and release them on Vancouver Island or an adjacent Gulf Island. Community members are vital to the project's success, through participating directly or stewarding habitat. We will provide public education about the birds, as well as the ecosystems they depend upon. Project evaluation will assess the number and health of birds, as well as community engagement and conservation actions. Bringing this beautiful bird back to southwestern British Columbia is a powerful symbol of environmental hope: showing that it is possible to re-establish a part of our natural world that has disappeared.
$25,000.00
2012

Habitat Acquisition Trust

Fostering Wetland Stewardship: The Painted Turtle Conservation Circle

This project will enable four conservation organizations from different parts of southwest BC coast to join forces to protect the endangered western painted turtle, a flagship species for engaging communities in wetland conservation, and its associated habitat. The groups will share and standardize methods and stewardship materials, coordinate research, restore important habitats and create wetland management guidelines.
$30,000.00
2010

Home Is Where We Live Lifecycles Project Society

The Urban Seed Library will create a sustainable and transferable program model capable of institutionalizing seed collections and seed saving and biodiversity programming in BC's urban public libraries. Working with the Surrey Libraries, the Greater Victoria Public Library, and Richmond Food Security, we will collaboratively create an effective program model that will enable community members to establish viable seed collections in their local library. This project will create management systems and community resources that aim to make seeds and seed saving education freely accessible and publically shared. This will strengthen local food security, community health and biodiversity.
$25,000.00
2014

Invasive Species Council of BC

Engaging Communities: Spotters Workshops and Community Events

To develop a Spotters Network Workshop tailored to the needs of First Nations and horticulture groups. The workshops will train individuals to identify and record invasive plants in a provincial database. The database will identify priority treatment areas for partners to complete community weed pulls and massive species mitigation activities.
$30,000.00
2010

Kitasoo Kitasoo Band Council

Community Energy

Our program supports member Coastal First Nations communities in achieving their clean energy goals. We do this by hosing a supportive 'community of practice' where local leaders learn from each other, have access to external resources on an as-needed basis, and record progress towards their implementation goals on an annual basis. This program is in its third year, and is working towards achieving the objectives of the Great Bear Clean Energy Action Plan (2011) and the updated Clean Energy Strategy (2014). This work is important as it supports a strong peer-to-peer program that helps local leaders be stewards of their environment while supporting their local economies, moving communities off diesel generators, and fostering community pride. The next two years of work will focus on engaging community memebres and famililes in each community on how to better use energy in their homes, saving money, reducing diesel generation, reducing local pollution, and improving personal and ecosystem health.
$20,000.00
2014

Kwantlen Polytechnic University Foundation

Environmental Assessment of Southwest BC's Bio-regional Food System Future

The proposed is part of the SW British Columbia Bio-regional Food System Design and Plan study. We intend to elucidate environmental impacts/stewardship potentials of future food system choices, incorporating critical environmental stewardship/enhancement elements into a design that maximizes food self-reliance. We have identified a suite of environmental indicators for quantification, modeling, & monitoring of impacts of food production on soil, air & water quality, climate change, biodiversity & ecological footprint, to quantify the current status of food production in SWBC. We will model how outcomes may change given population growth, climate change impact and agricultural land diminution & explore options for increasing regional food production while protecting water resources & habitat, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, & lowering our food ecological footprint. We will then work with stakeholders to ID & develop strategies for minimizing tradeoffs to design a system to achieve multiple objectives of environmental stewardship, increasing food self-reliance, a robust economy.
$25,000.00
2014

LEPS

Bertrand Watershed Education Team (B-WET) Project

The B-WET project will foster private land stewardship on properties adjacent to Bertrand Creek, raise citizen awareness of watershed issues, and enhance and protect critical habitat for native and endangered species. To achieve this, Langley Environmental Partners Society will deliver stewardship information packages; work with property owners to provide practical stream stewardship advice; and work with landowners who are willing to enhance their streamside riparian area (the bank along the creek). The team will also offer watershed walking tours and Streamkeeper training (a watershed education program); watershed information presentations; school workshops; stream clean up, invasive species removal, streamside treeplanting and stormdrain marking events.
$25,000.00
2011

Nuxalk Nation

Nuxalk Sputc Protection: a community-based eulachon conservation project

This innovative project will advance conservation policy and practice through the creation of a community-based Sputc (eulachon) Protection Plan. Bringing together Nuxalkmc (Nuxalk people) and resource managers, the plan will integrate traditional knowledge and science through community events, archival research, and interviews, upholding traditional ways of knowing while enhancing engagement in eulachon protection. Many recognize the value of including First Nations knowledge in decision-making, but the means by which to do so are largely undeveloped. This grassroots project –the first of its kind- will serve as an example of traditional knowledge integration in practice. Broad interest in the project has been expressed by other Nations and partners, who hope to use it as a template for future engagement. Accordingly, a strategic regional workshop will be held to share lessons learned. This project is one pillar of a cultural revitalisation initiative currently underway in Nuxalk territory, which includes the revival of an annual eulachon welcoming ceremony, a film, and research.
$30,000.00
2014

Pages