Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Canadian Environmental Grantmaker's Network

Shared Learning in Support of an Environmentally Sound and Sustainable Future

The Canadian Environmental Grantmakers' Network (CEGN) and the Sustainability Network are seeking support for a Shared Learning initiative designed to increase the capacity, effectiveness and collaboration of the environmental community (both non-profits and funders). The proposed initiative will help to equip the environmental community to be more effective agents for the protection of Canada's environment. It will do so through shared learning opportunities which will result in: i) increased knowledge and skills; ii) more effective public communication; and iii) stronger networking and collaboration among members of the environmental community. Bridging the divide between funders and non-profits is central to this initiative. Both the scale of environmental challenges that confront us and the fact that increasing numbers of funders are shifting from 'grant-givers' to 'change-makers' demand a stronger alliance between these two parts of the environmental community.
$33,000.00
2012

Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources

Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe Watershed Planning Readiness Assessment

The Chilliwack River Watershed is home to the Ts’elxweyeqw Tribe (TT), who are Stó:lō: 'People of the River”. They have stewarded this area since time immemorial; this intimate connection is reflected in its name: ‘Chilliwack’ is the anglicised version of Ts’elxweyeqw. In partnership with CIER and The WaterWealth Project, the TT are seeking funds for a Watershed Planning Readiness Assessment, which is the critical first phase of an indigenous-led Watershed Plan. The Readiness Assessment will confirm community interest in watershed planning, identify key gaps and needs in community capacity, and build essential knowledge and understanding of the planning process. The results of the first phase are required to move forward with the second phase of developing a Watershed Plan as it will identify an appropriate process and determine scope. A Ts’elxweyeqw Watershed Plan could involve indigenous and non-indigenous partners and will be driven by/interwoven with indigenous values, approaches and knowledge.
$30,000.00
2014

Comox Valley Project Watershed Society

Protecting and Restoring the Courtenay River Estuary

The Estuary Working Group (EWG), representing 13 environmental organisations is currently working on eelgrass and habitat restoration, carbon sequestration research, a National Historic Status bid, and yearly awareness campaigns. The EWG has participated with the Comox Valley Regional District in revising a Courtenay River Estuary Management Plan, originally created in 2000 but never implemented. The revised plan needs the support of local municipalities. They were invited to take part in revising the plan but declined to do so. We propose to create an interactive animated 3D map of the estuary to illustrate changes over time, the problems that need to be addressed and present various scenarios for resolving these challenges. The complexity and interconnectedness of the estuary’s ecosystems, examples of economic development compatible with a healthy functioning estuary, and potential social and recreational benefits will be highlighted. In creating the map we intend to engage local officials, planners, and other stakeholders in data gathering and visioning a desired future estuary.
$30,000.00
2012

Cowichan Community Land Trust Society

Friends of Cowichan Creeks Project

The Friends of Cowichan Creeks Project will initiate streamkeeping and ecological restoration efforts on six urban creeks in the Cowichan Valley. Consultants from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans will help prescribe restoration plans, and the organization will implement these plans with the help of volunteers. They will also offer four Streamkeeper courses and two riparian restoration workshops for members of the public.
$30,000.00
2010

Ecojustice Canada Society

Litigation and Law Reform Response to the Budget Implementation Act (Bill C-38)

With the passage of Bill C-38, Canada’s Budget Implementation Act, key environmental laws are being dismantled. A legal problem requires a legal solution, and, as the leading environmental law organization in Canada, Ecojustice will respond to these challenges. The courts are independent of government and play a vitally important role in our democracy, perhaps now more than ever. The courts must be the forum where we argue for the rights of our citizens to be heard and that our prosperity depends on environmental protection. A response to changes in law must be strategic, informed, and collaborative. Under the supervision of a new Law and Policy Lead, Ecojustice will identify, develop and implement test case litigation to challenge the legality of new provisions or regulations to enable Bill C-38. We will play a leadership role within BC’s environmental community by building strategic partnerships and roles, and recruiting and educating new and diverse clients and allies to lay the groundwork for a long-term plan to restore federal environmental laws.
$40,000.00
2012

Fraser Valley Watersheds Coalition

Restoring and Sustaining our Freshwater Resources

Restoring and Sustaining our Freshwater Resources: Creating a Culture for natural healthy communities. FVWC will work with landowners, governments, First Nations, other organizations and communities across the Fraser Valley. The focus is to create a culture around protecting and sustaining our freshwater resources. In order to do so, a number of projects benefiting the different facets of the region and diversity of people, coupled with existing and publicly accepted events, is required. In general, we plan to: -Help identify local and regional level threats to waterways and create a shared information database with a regional/watershed approach. -Monitor water quality/fish presence along key watercourses across the Fraser Valley that contain known salmon spawning, rearing and other rare species. Data will be used to help isolate areas of waterway threats and opportunities. -Host a Manure and Water workshop. -Conduct riparian habitat enhancements throughout the Fraser Valley. -Engage and share knowledge about protecting freshwater resources -Conduct habitat restoration
$30,000.00
2013

Habitat Acquisition Trust

Fostering Wetland Stewardship: The Painted Turtle Conservation Circle

This project will enable four conservation organizations from different parts of southwest BC coast to join forces to protect the endangered western painted turtle, a flagship species for engaging communities in wetland conservation, and its associated habitat. The groups will share and standardize methods and stewardship materials, coordinate research, restore important habitats and create wetland management guidelines.
$30,000.00
2010

Invasive Species Council of BC

Engaging Communities: Spotters Workshops and Community Events

To develop a Spotters Network Workshop tailored to the needs of First Nations and horticulture groups. The workshops will train individuals to identify and record invasive plants in a provincial database. The database will identify priority treatment areas for partners to complete community weed pulls and massive species mitigation activities.
$30,000.00
2010

KATZIE CULTURAL EDUCATION SOCIETY

Eco-Cultural Restoration in Katzie Traditional Territory

The Katzie First Nation have participated at multiple levels of involvement in the restoration efforts of several organizations over the past decade. The KCES recognizes that restoration success in the traditional territory can be improved with clear goals and a bioregional scale of planning based on the principles of ecosystem and adaptive management. Of particular importance is the inclusion of traditional knowledge and values. The KCES propose to address these gaps by combining both scientific and traditional knowledge and values in a restoration plan for the Katzie traditional territory. To meet this goal, an Eco-Cultural Restoration Plan will be developed and shared with community participants that will be based on a wide spectrum of values distilled from community engagement workshops. This Plan will be bioregional in scope, but will contain site-specific guidelines that will identify key issues and solutions derived from traditional and scientific knowledge. Based on the Plan guidelines, three model sites will receive restoration efforts and will be monitored for success.
$38,000.00
2014

Kitasoo Kitasoo Band Council

Groundfish research by Central Coast Nations to implement marine protected areas

Our marine use plan identifies rockfish and lingcod as cultural and economic resources that have been overfished. Further, scientists warn that declines of large predators, such as lingcod and yelloweye rockfish, may disrupt entire ecological communities. Our marine use plan also is the backbone for the MaPP initiative (mappocean.org), an ongoing partnership between the Province of BC and First Nations which is zoning allowable uses, designing a candidate network of marine protected areas (MPA) and selecting indicator species for ecosystem health. MPA implementation, however, will require further collaboration with the federal government. Crucial to that implementation, our project uses science and traditional knowledge to document the past and current status of rockfish and lingcod populations. The resulting data will support final site selection for the MPA network and provide baselines for restoration and conservation goals, thereby ensuring that federal decisions on spatial protection address First Nation concerns. Given the current momentum of MaPP, our project is very timely.
$35,000.00
2014

Nuxalk Nation

Nuxalk Sputc Protection: a community-based eulachon conservation project

This innovative project will advance conservation policy and practice through the creation of a community-based Sputc (eulachon) Protection Plan. Bringing together Nuxalkmc (Nuxalk people) and resource managers, the plan will integrate traditional knowledge and science through community events, archival research, and interviews, upholding traditional ways of knowing while enhancing engagement in eulachon protection. Many recognize the value of including First Nations knowledge in decision-making, but the means by which to do so are largely undeveloped. This grassroots project –the first of its kind- will serve as an example of traditional knowledge integration in practice. Broad interest in the project has been expressed by other Nations and partners, who hope to use it as a template for future engagement. Accordingly, a strategic regional workshop will be held to share lessons learned. This project is one pillar of a cultural revitalisation initiative currently underway in Nuxalk territory, which includes the revival of an annual eulachon welcoming ceremony, a film, and research.
$30,000.00
2014

Pembina Foundation for Environmental Research and Education

Water and Energy: A Critical New Intersection

In the past several years, new energy developments - be they gas production practices or renewable electricity projects - are having an impact on water resources throughout British Columbia. The Pembina Foundation seeks the support of the Vancouver Foundation to increase the public understanding of threats that energy developments pose to our water resources. There are two specific opportunities in 2011 to do so. The first is the B.C. government's plan to introduce legislative changes to the 100 year old Water Act, through its Water Act Modernization process, and the second is the recent passage of the B.C. Clean Energy Act and the requirement for BC Hydro to develop an Integrated Resource Plan for renewable electricity development by the end of 2011.
$35,000.00
2010

QQS (EYES) Projects Society

Building capacity for salmon stewardship - traditional fish weir in the Koeye

The weir project aims to build capacity, and increase engagement in resource stewardship in the Heiltsuk community of Bella Bella by resurrecting the traditional practice of building fish weirs on the Koeye River. Fish weirs were used for thousands of years by First Nations as a means of selectively harvesting salmon in large rivers; however the practice has been dormant in Central Coast communities for more than 100 years. The project stems from Qqs’ core mission of engaging youth in Heiltsuk culture and their environment, and builds upon existing youth and environment programs at Koeye, creating a unique opportunity to involve young people in a project that provides critical data for the conservation of Heiltsuk resources. The Koeye is among the most important salmon producing streams in Heiltsuk territory. Enumeration of salmon using the traditional fish weir, would greatly enhance our understanding of salmon within Koeye, and would have broad relevance for understanding salmon populations throughout the region.
$30,000.00
2012

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Keeping BC's North Coast Oil Free

This project will enable Raincoast Conservation Foundation and Living Oceans Society to participate in the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency review process. They want to research and identify the risks to ecosystems associated with Enbridge’s proposal to build a pipeline from the tar sands terminal in Alberta to the BC coast and transport this oil by tanker from Kitimat to offshore markets, which presents the likelihood of oil spills in some of world’s most ecologically valuable and unique ecosystems, including the globally renowned parks and waterways of the Great Bear Rainforest and Haida Gwaii.
$40,000.00
2010

Ruby Lake Lagoon Nature Reserve Society Lagoon Society

A Regional Biodiversity Strategy for the Sunshine Coast

The Lagoon Society will work collaboratively with other organizations to engage residents in biodiversity conservation, conduct a biodiversity assessment, and develop a regional biodiversity conservation strategy. We will bring together existing information and conduct new inventories and assessments to evaluate the current status of biodiversity, assess threats, and identify high priority areas for conservation and restoration. We will bring together scientists, land managers and stakeholders at a 3-day summit to develop a biodiversity conservation framework with common objectives, coordinated strategies and effective measures to conserve, enhance and monitor biodiversity in the region. By carrying out diverse public outreach activities, we will encourage and enable residents to assist with biodiversity conservation. In the long-term, this project will increase the capacity of our community to undertake sound stewardship of biodiversity and ensure that our region maintains a connected, biologically diverse network of habitats, healthy, resilient ecosystems and ecosystem services.
$40,000.00
2011

Small Change Fund

Building Grassroots Action in British Columbia

Small Change Fund is changing the funding landscape for grassroots groups across Canada. We are connecting community projects, especially those in remote and rural areas, with donors through our innovative crowd-funding platform and communications campaigns. Without Small Change Fund, grassroots groups have few, if any, sources of support and channels to communicate their messages. Over the past year, we received more applications to support vital grassroots action taking place in British Columbia than any province/territory. B.C grassroots leaders clearly see Small Change Fund as an opportunity to secure resources to contend with their specific set of struggles around resource development and Aboriginal rights. Now, more than ever, grassroots leaders in British Columbia are mobilizing around the challenges they are facing in their communities. We want to answer the call of these leaders, and be responsive by offering the support they are asking of us.
$35,000.00
2011

The Land Trust Alliance of British Columbia

BC Conservation Toolkit

The Conservation Toolkit will be targeted toward four distinct user groups: land trusts, landowners, local governments and professional advisors (realtors, accountants, lawyers). The Conservation Toolkit will be an online/print repository of documents, hosted by the LTABC, related to work of land trusts (specifically in BC, but with broader applications as well). Each section of the Toolkit will provide templates and sample documents related to the legal, financial and policy tools available for conservation in BC. The Toolkit (in particular the Landowner Toolkit) will include online videos on topics such as conservation covenants. Where possible, sample documents will be solicited from LTABC member land trusts and other partners. However, it is anticipated that additional work will be required to create or refine templates and information for different sections of the Toolkit. Where relevant, connections will be made between existing and related tools, such as the Canadian Land Trust Standards and Practices and Greening Your Title.
$30,000.00
2013

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Clean Energy Transition Project, Clean Energy Canada at Tides Canada

Our organization is working to encourage provincial leadership on climate disruption, while lowering overall energy use and diversifying the provincial economy. We are building consensus on how British Columbia might best reduce its dependence on carbon-based commodities such as oil, gas, and coal, and instead create an ecologically responsible low-carbon society that creates prosperity through clean-energy innovation. We created the project after identifying a significant gap in the climate and energy advocacy landscape; there was no NGO focused on accelerating Canada’s transition to a low-carbon society. Our scope is national, but energy is provincially regulated and we are in Vancouver, so we devote special attention to British Columbia—which has a strong base of policy leadership to build upon. We primarily work with thought leaders and policy makers to build support for policy action among a powerful and diverse array of business, government, and civil society actors, but we are also engaging with citizens to support leadership on climate change, clean energy, and efficiency.
$35,000.00
2013

Protecting Fish Habitat and Freshwater in the Upper Fraser Basin

This project will further the work between the First Nations of the Yinka Dene Alliance (YDA) and Dr. Jack Stanford, a Professor of Ecology at the University of Montana specializing in river and freshwater ecology. It will combine Dr. Stanford’s impact assessment of the proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline on the Sutherland, Stuart, and Salmon Rivers within the YDA traditional territories with the traditional ecological knowledge holders of the YDA First Nations. The final results will inform the YDA traditional decision-making process.
$40,000.00
2011

UBC - Faculty of Forestry

Visualizing Urban Futures with Community Energy

Public understanding and behaviour change on energy use is critical to reducing carbon footprints and building resilient communities. Since the idea of low-carbon community-wide energy systems is new in Canada, most people have little idea how typical neighbourhoods in Metro Vancouver can be retrofitted to be climate friendly. CALP proposes to engage communities, using compelling new visualisation tools to actively involve non-experts in learning about community energy. This proposal builds on an ongoing research study with Neptis Foundation and the GEOIDE Network Centre of Excellence, which is developing prototype visualization tools - "digital stories" about community energy, based on data in two pilot BC municipalities: Richmond and Surrey. This project will help build awareness and community capacity for climate change solutions. It will involve multiple stakeholders in developing a visual information toolkit for use in demonstrations, workshops, and web media to reach the "silent majority" who are often not engaged in social learning and community decision-making.
$30,000.00
2012

West Coast Environmental Law Research Foundation

Protecting the Communities and Ecosystems of the Salish Sea

Zoom online meeting software Meeting the challenge of climate change impacts like sea level rise has created an opportunity to deepen regional collaboration and improve environmental management and protection in the Salish Sea. A scientific report commissioned by West Coast in 2014 from the Fisheries Centre at UBC presents the “business case” to protect our coastal ecosystems, and documents case studies from other coastal areas around the world showing how coastal “green” infrastructure has effectively managed the impacts of extreme weather events. However, the effectiveness of green infrastructure measures is relatively limited if only implemented in a single municipality, and planning and implementation at a regional scale is necessary, which is what we will facilitate through this project. Our own legal research and analysis to date has helped identify examples of mechanisms and structures that would be effective in planning, co-managing, monitoring and enforcing environmental protection at a regional scale using an integrated approach, and there is willingness among key actors for regional collaboration.
$30,000.00
2014

Enabling a Greener BC Economy: Law Reform for Forest Ecosystems & Climate Change

Policies are urgently needed in British Columbia to protect the environment and sustain BC communities in an era of climate change. This multi-year project will assess the existing laws governing BC forests (approximately 80% of BC's land base) and advocate for corresponding law and policy reform.
$40,000.00
2011

Enabling a Greener BC Economy: Law Reform for Forest Ecosystems & Climate Change

To develop a law reform proposal on evolving forest policy and legislation to address climate change and enable new revenue streams for forest-dependent communities. This project would refine and advance this proposal by engaging with opinion leaders from conservation groups, First Nations, industry, local governments and senior government decision-makers (both provincial and First Nations).
$30,000.00
2010

Western Canada Wilderness Committee

The Time is Now - Legislation for BC’s Endangered Species

The goal of this project is to engage in extensive outreach and mobilization to further increase awareness about species at risk in British Columbia, and to advocate for strong endangered species legislation. Using and building on our outstanding educational resources from the past year – including video footage of species at risk, stunning photos, striking child and youth-produced artwork, compelling presentations, and our educational report – the Wilderness Committee proposes to extend our outreach and mobilization to a broader audience. Specifically, we will focus on three areas: children, youth, and young adults (through their educational institutions); a broader geographic focus; and increased outreach to the general public. With the upcoming BC election, this is a politically strategic time to put endangered species on the agenda. If the election results in a government committed to endangered species legislation, which is likely, this 18-month period will be instrumental in achieving strong, effective stand-alone legislation to protect endangered species.
$35,000.00
2013

Lifelines - Protecting BC's Wild Species and Spaces

LIFELINES will educate British Columbians about endangered species, with a special focus on connecting children and youth to ten flagship species at risk in BC. British Columbia is one of only two Canadian provinces without an endangered species law, yet the province is home to more wild plant and animal species than any other. This project will mobilize the public, youth, and children to act, using video, photography, educational reports, outdoor slide shows, story-telling, social media, mainstream media, and student-generated art exhibits, to bring endangered species back into the minds, hearts and homes of British Columbians.
$35,000.00
2011

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